Breonna Taylor Attorney General calls Megan Thee Stallion’s criticism of him ‘disgusting’

Louise Hall
·2 min read
Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron speaks during a press conference to announce a grand jury's decision to indict one of three Louisville Metro Police Department officers involved in the shooting death of Breonna Taylor (Getty Images)
Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron speaks during a press conference to announce a grand jury's decision to indict one of three Louisville Metro Police Department officers involved in the shooting death of Breonna Taylor (Getty Images)

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron has hit back at Megan Thee Stallion’s criticism of his decision not to bring charges in the case of the shooting of Breonna Taylor.

The heated comments come in response to the rapper's Saturday Night Live performance when she launched an attack against Mr Cameron for this role in Ms Taylor’s case.

During the opening episode of NBC late-night sketch series on Saturday, Stallion used the stage during her performance of hit “Savage” to draw attention to her message to protect black men and women.

She then played an audio clip of social justice activist Tamika Mallory saying: "Daniel Cameron is no different than the sellout Negroes that sold our people into slavery."

In an interview with Fox and Friends on Tuesday Mr Cameron agreed that “we need to love and protect our black women” but then hit out at Stallions “disparaging comments” calling them “disgusting”.

"The fact that a celebrity that I've never met before wants to make those sorts of statements — they don't hurt me, but what it does is it exposes the type of intolerance that people, and the hypocrisy," he said.

"Obviously people preach about being tolerant. You've seen a lot of that from the left about being tolerant. But what you saw there is inconsistent with tolerance. In fact, it's her espousing intolerance."

Ms Taylor, a 26-year-old Louisville emergency medical tech was shot dead by police during a drugs raid on her home in March.

The warrant to search her apartment was approved as part of a narcotics investigation into a suspect who lived across town, and no drugs were found at her home.

Mr Cameron, the first African American elected to the job in Kentucky, has been criticised by many for his decision not to directly charge any officers with Ms Taylor's killing.

The decision has sparked widespread outrage and protests in Atlanta, New York, Philadelphia and Washington.

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