Bryan Cranston Lists Eco-Friendly Beach House for $5 Million

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Joyce Chen
·2 min read
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Bryan Cranston and his wife, Robin Dearden, are hoping that their former beachside “love shack” will find just the right new owners. The Breaking Bad actor recently listed the eco-friendly Ventura County home that he helped design and build—and he admittedly has mixed feelings about it. Cranston is asking for $4.995 million for the dwelling, and he told the Wall Street Journal that he initially resisted the idea of selling the house after pouring so much time and energy into it.

Cranston and Dearden bought the property in 2007 for $2.5 million, and soon realized they had to substantially rebuild the existing 1940s house because “it was dirty and falling apart.” Together with his friend, designer John Turturro, Cranston imagined and then actualized the property as it stands: a 2,450-square-foot, three-bedroom modern structure built entirely with eco-friendly materials, including titanium circular towers and solar panels on the roof.

The living room has an ocean view.
The living room has an ocean view.
Photo: Jake Cryan
See the video.

The home holds LEED platinum certification and has a net-zero energy status—according to the WSJ, photovoltaic panels produce electricity for the house, hydronic panels accommodate hot water needs, and special insulated energy-efficient wall panels help to keep the indoor temperature consistent throughout the year, eliminating the need for air-conditioning. The home also utilizes natural light in all of its rooms and spaces, including the stairwell, which features a skylight and tall, thin windows. Large glass sliders on the main floor open completely onto a back deck overlooking the ocean, and really capitalize on the outdoor surroundings.

Cranston completed the project in 2013, during the final season of Breaking Bad. He tells the WSJ that he and Dearden are listing the property because they don’t get to spend enough time at the beach house.

Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest