Buckingham Palace Shares the Incredible Amount of Mail They've Received Since Queen Elizabeth's Death

LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 27: NEWS EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO SALES. NO USE AFTER OCTOBER 16 WITHOUT PRIOR APPROVAL FROM ROYAL COMMUNICATIONS) EDITORIAL USE ONLY. There shall be no commercial use whatsoever of the photograph (including any use in merchandising, advertising or any other non-editorial use). The photograph must not be digitally enhanced, manipulated or modified in any manner or form when published. The photograph will be free for press usage until October 16, 2022. It must not be used after this date without prior, written permission from Royal Communications. In this image released on September 30, letters of condolence sent by members of the public to King Charles III, the Queen Consort and the royal family are sorted by the Correspondence Team at Buckingham Palace at Buckingham Palace on September 27, 2022 in London, England. Since the death of Queen Elizabeth II, over 50,000 letters and messages of condolence have been sent to Buckingham Palace, including 6,500 in just one day after the Queen's state funeral. (Photo by Victoria Jones - Pool/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 27: NEWS EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO SALES. NO USE AFTER OCTOBER 16 WITHOUT PRIOR APPROVAL FROM ROYAL COMMUNICATIONS) EDITORIAL USE ONLY. There shall be no commercial use whatsoever of the photograph (including any use in merchandising, advertising or any other non-editorial use). The photograph must not be digitally enhanced, manipulated or modified in any manner or form when published. The photograph will be free for press usage until October 16, 2022. It must not be used after this date without prior, written permission from Royal Communications. In this image released on September 30, letters of condolence sent by members of the public to King Charles III, the Queen Consort and the royal family are sorted by the Correspondence Team at Buckingham Palace at Buckingham Palace on September 27, 2022 in London, England. Since the death of Queen Elizabeth II, over 50,000 letters and messages of condolence have been sent to Buckingham Palace, including 6,500 in just one day after the Queen's state funeral. (Photo by Victoria Jones - Pool/Getty Images)

Victoria Jones - Pool/Getty

Buckingham Palace's correspondence team has been hard at work since the death of Queen Elizabeth.

The palace announced Friday that following the monarch's death on Sept. 8, they have received over 50,000 letters and messages of condolence, including 6,500 in just one day following the Queen's funeral, which took place on Sept. 19. This is a steep uptick in mail — prior to Queen Elizabeth's death, the palace expected up to 1,000 letters each week from members of the public with various queries or messages of good wishes.

New images taken this week at Buckingham Palace show members of the correspondence team sorting through thousands of letters sent to King Charles III, Queen Camilla and other members of the royal family.

LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 27: NEWS EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO SALES. NO USE AFTER OCTOBER 16 WITHOUT PRIOR APPROVAL FROM ROYAL COMMUNICATIONS) EDITORIAL USE ONLY. There shall be no commercial use whatsoever of the photograph (including any use in merchandising, advertising or any other non-editorial use). The photograph must not be digitally enhanced, manipulated or modified in any manner or form when published. The photograph will be free for press usage until October 16, 2022. It must not be used after this date without prior, written permission from Royal Communications. In this image released on September 30, letters of condolence sent by members of the public to King Charles III, the Queen Consort and the royal family are sorted by the Correspondence Team at Buckingham Palace at Buckingham Palace on September 27, 2022 in London, England. Since the death of Queen Elizabeth II, over 50,000 letters and messages of condolence have been sent to Buckingham Palace, including 6,500 in just one day after the Queen's state funeral. (Photo by Victoria Jones - Pool/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 27: NEWS EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO SALES. NO USE AFTER OCTOBER 16 WITHOUT PRIOR APPROVAL FROM ROYAL COMMUNICATIONS) EDITORIAL USE ONLY. There shall be no commercial use whatsoever of the photograph (including any use in merchandising, advertising or any other non-editorial use). The photograph must not be digitally enhanced, manipulated or modified in any manner or form when published. The photograph will be free for press usage until October 16, 2022. It must not be used after this date without prior, written permission from Royal Communications. In this image released on September 30, letters of condolence sent by members of the public to King Charles III, the Queen Consort and the royal family are sorted by the Correspondence Team at Buckingham Palace at Buckingham Palace on September 27, 2022 in London, England. Since the death of Queen Elizabeth II, over 50,000 letters and messages of condolence have been sent to Buckingham Palace, including 6,500 in just one day after the Queen's state funeral. (Photo by Victoria Jones - Pool/Getty Images)

Victoria Jones - Pool/Getty

According to the palace, all letters are carefully read. Responses will be sent as the small correspondence team processes the thousands of items.

RELATED: King Charles at Work! See Newly Image Released of Monarch with His Official Red Box

The mail going out of Buckingham Palace saw a change this week — starting on Tuesday, the postmarks began featuring King Charles' new cypher as monarch. The monogram shows the crown above his first initial "C" intertwined with an "R" for Rex (Latin for King, traditionally used for the monarch dating back to the 12th century), with "III" inside the "R."

LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 27: NEWS EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO SALES. NO USE AFTER OCTOBER 16 WITHOUT PRIOR APPROVAL FROM ROYAL COMMUNICATIONS) EDITORIAL USE ONLY. There shall be no commercial use whatsoever of the photograph (including any use in merchandising, advertising or any other non-editorial use). The photograph must not be digitally enhanced, manipulated or modified in any manner or form when published. The photograph will be free for press usage until October 16, 2022. It must not be used after this date without prior, written permission from Royal Communications. In this image released on September 30, letters of condolence sent by members of the public to King Charles III, the Queen Consort and the royal family are sorted by the Correspondence Team at Buckingham Palace at Buckingham Palace on September 27, 2022 in London, England. Since the death of Queen Elizabeth II, over 50,000 letters and messages of condolence have been sent to Buckingham Palace, including 6,500 in just one day after the Queen's state funeral. (Photo by Victoria Jones - Pool/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - SEPTEMBER 27: NEWS EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NO SALES. NO USE AFTER OCTOBER 16 WITHOUT PRIOR APPROVAL FROM ROYAL COMMUNICATIONS) EDITORIAL USE ONLY. There shall be no commercial use whatsoever of the photograph (including any use in merchandising, advertising or any other non-editorial use). The photograph must not be digitally enhanced, manipulated or modified in any manner or form when published. The photograph will be free for press usage until October 16, 2022. It must not be used after this date without prior, written permission from Royal Communications. In this image released on September 30, letters of condolence sent by members of the public to King Charles III, the Queen Consort and the royal family are sorted by the Correspondence Team at Buckingham Palace at Buckingham Palace on September 27, 2022 in London, England. Since the death of Queen Elizabeth II, over 50,000 letters and messages of condolence have been sent to Buckingham Palace, including 6,500 in just one day after the Queen's state funeral. (Photo by Victoria Jones - Pool/Getty Images)

Victoria Jones - Pool/Getty

The King chose the design from several that were created by the palace's heraldry experts, the College of Arms.

The symbol will soon become commonplace where royal symbols are shown, replacing Queen Elizabeth's "ERII" insignia. Some of these changes will be gradual, palace officials say, but will be seen on state documents and eventually on the red mailboxes around the U.K.

The photograph must not be digitally enhanced, manipulated or modified in any manner or form when published. The photograph will be free for press usage until 7th October 2022. It must not be used after this date without prior, written permission from Royal Communications. In this image released on September 23, King Charles III carries out official government duties from his red box in the Eighteenth Century Room at Buckingham Palace, London.
The photograph must not be digitally enhanced, manipulated or modified in any manner or form when published. The photograph will be free for press usage until 7th October 2022. It must not be used after this date without prior, written permission from Royal Communications. In this image released on September 23, King Charles III carries out official government duties from his red box in the Eighteenth Century Room at Buckingham Palace, London.

Victoria Jones - Pool/Getty King Charles

Also on Tuesday, the Royal Mail revealed the commemorative stamp collection that will be issued in the late monarch's honor later this fall. The postage set was the first approved by King Charles since he became sovereign.

"For the past seventy years every British stamp has been personally approved by Her Late Majesty, Queen Elizabeth. Today we are unveiling these stamps, the first to be approved by His Majesty The King, in tribute to a woman whose commitment to public service and duty was unparalleled in the history of this country," Simon Thompson, CEO of the Royal Mail, said in a statement.

The four stamps are grayscale photos of the Queen taken at different points in her life and were first sold as a suite for her Golden Jubilee in 2002. To update the set as a memorial collection, the year of her birth and death were added in the upper corner.

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The British mail service also announced that it will move from using an image of Queen Elizabeth on its "everyday" stamp to instead feature a shot of King Charles, 73. A silhouette of the King will similarly replace that of the late Queen on special stamps as well.

The Royal Mail said in a statement that more details will be released in "due course" and that the new Charles stamps "will enter circulation once current stocks of stamps are exhausted" to heed practicalities.