Captain Sir Tom Moore to be knighted by Queen at Windsor Castle

Rebecca Taylor
·Royal Correspondent
·3 min read

Captain Tom Moore will be knighted in person by the Queen at Windsor Castle on Friday, as she makes a rare public appearance during the coronavirus pandemic.

Sir Tom won the hearts of the nation when he set out to walk 100 lengths of his back garden before his 100th birthday, to raise money for NHS charities together earlier this year.

He continued walking after he hit his 100th lap, and raised £32m, having aimed for £1,000.

Sir Tom was nominated for a knighthood by Boris Johnson in May, following his mammoth fundraising effort.

British World War II veteran Captain Tom Moore, 99, poses doing a lap of his garden in the village of Marston Moretaine, 50 miles north of London, on April 16, 2020. - A 99-year-old British World War II veteran Captain Tom Moore on April 16 completed 100 laps of his garden in a fundraising challenge for healthcare staff that has "captured the heart of the nation", raising more than £13 million ($16.2 million, 14.9 million euros). "Incredible and now words fail me," Captain Moore said, after finishing the laps of his 25-metre (82-foot) garden with his walking frame. (Photo by JUSTIN TALLIS / AFP) (Photo by JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP via Getty Images)
Captain Tom Moore captured the hearts of the nation with his walk for the NHS. (Getty Images)

He and his family will be present at a private Windsor Castle ceremony, which has been arranged despite the other investitures being cancelled because of COVID-19.

Read more: 'Gosh, that sounds dangerous': The Queen does Zoom

The Queen will use her father’s sword to bestow the honour of Knight Bachelor.

The ceremony will be entirely inside Windsor Castle, with no viewing areas for the public, to ensure crowds do not gather.

In a message on Twitter, Sir Tom said: “I could never have imagined this would happen to me. It is such a huge honour and I am very much looking forward to meeting Her Majesty The Queen. It is going to be the most special of days for me.”

Britain's Queen Elizabeth II attends a ceremony to mark her official birthday at Windsor Castle in Windsor, southeast England on June 13, 2020, as Britain's Queen Elizabeth II celebrates her 94th birthday this year. (Photo by TOBY MELVILLE / POOL / AFP) (Photo by TOBY MELVILLE/POOL/AFP via Getty Images)
The Queen has made a few appearances during the pandemic. (Getty Images)

It marks a rare public appearance for the monarch during the pandemic. She has made two televised addresses during the last four months, and has been seen on a handful of occasions, including for Trooping the Colour on her official birthday.

But she has had to carry out engagements over zoom and by telephone, unable to go out in person.

Her family is returning to public duties and the investiture will be seen as a clear sign she wishes to get back to duties when she can as well.

99-year-old war veteran Captain Tom Moore, with (left to right) grandson Benji, daughter Hannah Ingram-Moore and granddaughter Georgia, at his home in Marston Moretaine, Bedfordshire, after he achieved his goal of 100 laps of his garden - raising more than 12 million pounds for the NHS. (Photo by Joe Giddens/PA Images via Getty Images)
The veteran will be able to take family members with him. (Getty Images)

Read more: Queen could be asked to wear a face mask as a 'role model'

The Queen, 94, and her husband Prince Philip, 99, have been at Windsor Castle since mid-March, one of their longest stints ever at the Berkshire home.

It’s usually the Queen’s weekend and Easter residence, but she has been there in isolation for much longer this year because of the pandemic.

In normal circumstances, she would be in Scotland by this time of year for the summer, but the palace will have to continue to follow government guideline development before she can move north.

Sir Tom’s fundraising efforts previously caught the attention of the Royal Family, with Prince William making a private donation to the cause.

The Queen also had his 100th birthday card delivered in person by Lord-Lieutenant Helen Nellis, her personal representative in Bedfordshire, as a special touch.