Championship Summaries

Mar 2 (OPTA) - Summaries for the Championship on Monday (start times are BST) Middlesbrough (2) 2 Scorers: R. Gestede 40, L. Wing 44 Yellow card: Shotton 75 Subs used: Saville 81 (Wing), Spence 87 (Tavernier) Nottingham Forest (1) 2 Scorers: R. Yates 29, L. Grabban 86 Yellow card: João Carvalho 92 Subs used: Diakhaby 56 (Alfa Semedo), João Carvalho 69 (Ameobi), Bostock 78 (Yates) Attendance: 18,884 Referee: Darren England ................................................................. Friday, March 6 fixtures (BST/GMT) Nottingham Forest v Millwall (1945) Saturday, March 7 fixtures (BST/GMT) Bristol City v Fulham (1230) Barnsley v Cardiff City (1500) Birmingham City v Reading (1500) Brentford v Sheffield Wednesday (1500) Charlton Athletic v Middlesbrough (1500) Leeds United v Huddersfield Town (1500) Preston North End v Queens Park Rangers (1500) Stoke City v Hull City (1500) Swansea City v West Bromwich Albion (1500) Wigan Athletic v Luton Town (1500)

  • Trump sees 'hard days' ahead in coronavirus fight, with as many as 240,000 Americans dead
    Yahoo News

    Trump sees 'hard days' ahead in coronavirus fight, with as many as 240,000 Americans dead

    Nearly a quarter million people in the United States could die as a result of the coronavirus outbreak, Trump administration officials said Tuesday. In what was presented as a best case scenario in which millions of citizens across the country adhered to intensive social distancing guidelines promoted by the Trump administration, between 100,000 and 240,000 Americans are still expected to be killed by COVID-19. “We're going to do everything we can to get [the U.S. death toll] significantly below that,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, whose forthright manner has made him a star of the coronavirus briefings.

  • Liberty University students choose sides after fallout from coronavirus reporting
    Yahoo News

    Liberty University students choose sides after fallout from coronavirus reporting

    The New York Times reported this week that almost a dozen Liberty University students have come down with COVID-19 symptoms since the school reopened last week, according to a bombshell article published Sunday that cites a local physician in Lynchburg, Va., where the evangelical university is situated. “We've lost the ability to corral this thing,” Dr. Thomas W. Eppes Jr. said he told Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr., according to the article. The Times identified Eppes as the head of the school's student health service, but he does not appear on the Liberty University website and a school spokesman told Yahoo News he has no official connection to the university.

  • Trump: US to deploy anti-drug Navy ships near Venezuela
    Associated Press

    Trump: US to deploy anti-drug Navy ships near Venezuela

    President Donald Trump announced Wednesday that Navy ships are being moved toward Venezuela as his administration beefs up counter-narcotics operations in the Caribbean following a U.S. drug indictment against Nicolás Maduro. The announcement came at the start of the daily White House press briefing to discuss the coronavirus pandemic, which has left much of the country in lock-down and which the government warns could cause 100,000 to 240,000 deaths. The Venezuelan people continue to suffer tremendously due to Maduro and his criminal control over the country, and drug traffickers are seizing on this lawlessness,” Defense Secretary Mark Esper said after the president's announcement.

  • Great Recession showed countries can’t fight the coronavirus economic crisis alone
    USA TODAY Opinion

    Great Recession showed countries can’t fight the coronavirus economic crisis alone

    As the world economy enters an unprecedented crisis caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, and policymakers in Washington and other global capitals prepare record fiscal stimulus plans, stakeholders should heed an important lesson from the last financial downturn in 2008: Recovery is only possible through coordinated global action. A little more than 10 years ago, as the world was entering the Great Recession, stakeholders had to look far back in the rearview mirror to the Great Depression for policy guidance. While the actions of the 1930s did offer important lessons for 2008 — most notably the need to expand the money supply — the economy of the 1930s was fundamentally different than the global economy of the early part of this century.

  • 3 mild symptoms could predict which coronavirus patients develop severe lung disease, research suggests — including body aches
    Business Insider

    3 mild symptoms could predict which coronavirus patients develop severe lung disease, research suggests — including body aches

    Getty Images Related Video: What COVID-19 Symptoms Look Like, Day by Day The coronavirus pandemic has forced doctors to make difficult decisions about which patients get immediate medical care. In New York City, where more than 38,000 cases have been reported, hospitals are reserving tests for patients with severe illness, while patients with mild cases — which can still be painful and long-lasting — have been told to stay home. But doctors still know very little about the symptoms that serve as warning signs in the lead-up to a severe case of COVID-19.

  • Navy says it can't empty Roosevelt amid coronavirus because of its weapons, nuclear reactor
    USA TODAY

    Navy says it can't empty Roosevelt amid coronavirus because of its weapons, nuclear reactor

    WASHINGTON – The coronavirus outbreak aboard the USS Theodore Roosevelt escalated Wednesday as more sailors tested positive for the virus and U.S. Navy officials scrambled to respond to the desperate evacuation plea from the aircraft carrier's captain. As of midday Wednesday, 93 crew members had tested positive for the virus, and 593 tested negative, Thomas Modly, acting Secretary of the Navy, told reporters during a briefing Wednesday. There are approximately 5,000 crew members on board.

  • India’s coronavirus emergency just beginning as lockdown threatens to turn into human tragedy
    The Telegraph

    India’s coronavirus emergency just beginning as lockdown threatens to turn into human tragedy

    An estimated 120 million Indian labourers are in the same predicament as Mr Asif, and Mr Modi has been accused of causing a humanitarian disaster by locking down the cities and unleashing a wave of poor migrant workers. Many of those who have been forced out of work have streamed back along highways and railway lines to their home states and villages, potentially spreading the coronavirus infection into the country's hinterlands. Mr Modi's lockdown was a knee-jerk reaction without thought for the consequences to the poor, claimed Manish Tewari, an MP for the Congress party.

  • Australia cruise ship evictions tread coronavirus diplomacy tightrope
    Reuters

    Australia cruise ship evictions tread coronavirus diplomacy tightrope

    Australia is pushing foreign-flagged cruise ships to leave its territorial waters amid the coronavirus pandemic, walking a diplomatic tightrope as it also tries to bring home citizens trapped on ships abroad. Western Australia state Premier Mark McGowan on Wednesday called on the federal government to kick out the German-owned MV Artania after the crew was reported to have asked the Australian Border Force (ABF) for permission to stay until April 14. "If what's required is to clean the ship as a condition of getting it underway, well then do that ... but get the ship away from Western Australia as soon as possible," WA Premier Mark McGowan told reporters, adding there were six to nine other ships off Sydney.

  • 12 Buildings That Show the Beauty of Deconstructed Architecture
    Architectural Digest

    12 Buildings That Show the Beauty of Deconstructed Architecture

    From Zaha Hadid's majestic MAXII in Italy to the stunning beauty of Frank Gehry's Vitra Design Museum, these structures elevate the environment they were built in Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • Iran warns U.S. over Iraq deployment amid virus
    Yahoo News Video

    Iran warns U.S. over Iraq deployment amid virus

    On Wednesday Iran warned the U.S. it was “warmongering during the coronavirus outbreak,” after it deployed Patriot air defense missiles to Iraq.

  • Coronavirus: Trump sends in military amid fears of 'losing ground' to drug cartels during pandemic
    The Independent

    Coronavirus: Trump sends in military amid fears of 'losing ground' to drug cartels during pandemic

    Donald Trump and his top military commanders announced a new operation to combat "Mexican drug cartels" and other Central and South American narcotics organisations – saying he fears "losing ground" to such groups. "We will defend our country regardless of the cost," Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley said during a White House briefing. "We're at war with COVID-19, we're at war with terrorists and we're at war with the drug cartels," the president said.

  • Defense lawyer in death of 7 motorcyclists: Biker at fault
    Associated Press

    Defense lawyer in death of 7 motorcyclists: Biker at fault

    One of the motorcyclists in a crash that killed him and six fellow bikers on a north woods highway was drunk and actually was the one who hit a pickup and caused the accident, the lawyer for the truck driver charged with homicide said in a document made public Tuesday. A New Hampshire State Police account of the June 21 crash in the community of Randolph “was deeply flawed," the lawyer for truck driver Volodymyr Zhukovskyy, 24, of West Springfield, Massachusetts, said in a motion filed Friday that seeks a hearing to set him free on bail. State police initially determined that the flatbed trailer he was hauling was 1 1/2 feet over the center line at the time of impact, the motion said.

  • One country is refusing to shut down to stop the coronavirus
    NBC News

    One country is refusing to shut down to stop the coronavirus

    While officials from Montreal to Moscow have placed populations under some form of lockdown designed to slow the spread of the coronavirus, one man continues to hold firm to the notion that the rest of the world has lost its mind: Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko. “It is better to die on your feet than live on your knees!” Lukashenko told a Belarusian television reporter Saturday when asked whether the coronavirus could stop him from hitting the rink for a propaganda-filled hockey game. Lukashenko, one of the longest-serving leaders in the former Soviet Union, has been in power for over 25 years.

  • The US paid millions of taxpayer dollars to a company for thousands of much-needed ventilators. But the company is busy selling more expensive models abroad.
    Business Insider

    The US paid millions of taxpayer dollars to a company for thousands of much-needed ventilators. But the company is busy selling more expensive models abroad.

    Millions of taxpayer dollars were spent on developing portable, easy-to-use ventilators to prepare for a national health crisis like the coronavirus pandemic — but not a single one is in the federal stockpile. The US Department of Health and Human Services signed a $13.8 million contract with health technology giant Royal Philips N.V. to produce portable, easy-to-use ventilators to add to the federal stockpile. Although HHS ordered 10,000 units of the ventilator in September 2019, the company began selling two higher-priced commercial versions of the same ventilator around the world.

  • Angry Wuhan next-of-kin seek answers over virus handling
    AFP

    Angry Wuhan next-of-kin seek answers over virus handling

    Zhang took his elderly father to a Wuhan hospital for a surgical procedure in January, just as coronavirus was consuming the central Chinese city. Devastated and angry, Zhang is now demanding answers from a government that he accuses of incompetence and lying about the extent of the virus. Zhang says he has linked online with dozens of other people whose grief over lost loved ones is paired with anger.

  • U.S. is swiftly deporting migrant children at the border
    CBS News

    U.S. is swiftly deporting migrant children at the border

    Citing a public health order to curb the coronavirus pandemic, the Trump administration is swiftly deporting unaccompanied migrant minors apprehended near the U.S.-Mexico border, upending a long-standing practice required under a federal law designed to protect children from violence and exploitation. Despite initially maintaining that the new measures would not apply to unaccompanied minors, Customs and Border Protection on Monday said its officials could deny entry to children who cross the southern border alone under an order by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC. The agency said some minors could be excluded from the CDC directive if a border official "suspects trafficking or sees signs of illness."

  • Chinese Doctor Disappears after Blowing the Whistle on Coronavirus Threat
    National Review

    Chinese Doctor Disappears after Blowing the Whistle on Coronavirus Threat

    Wuhan doctor Ai Fen, who expressed early concerns about the coronavirus to the media, has disappeared and is believed detained by Chinese authorities. Fen, the head of emergency at Wuhan Central Hospital, was given a warning after she disseminated information about the coronavirus to several other doctors. The reprimand from her boss came after Fen took a photo of a patient's positive test results and circled the words 'SARS coronavirus' in red.

  • Reuters

    Myanmar charges journalist under terrorism law, blocks news websites

    Myanmar last week declared the Arakan Army a terrorist group after more than a year of intense fighting against the organization, which recruits from the mostly Buddhist ethnic Rakhine majority and seeks greater autonomy for the region. The court in the second largest city, Mandalay, charged Nay Myo Lin, the editor-in-chief of Voice of Myanmar, under sections of the Terrorism Act for conducting the March 27 interview with the Arakan Army in which it responded to Myanmar's decision to label it as a terrorist group.

  • Half of Iceland's COVID-19 spreaders may be asymptomatic, early data suggest
    The Week

    Half of Iceland's COVID-19 spreaders may be asymptomatic, early data suggest

    Iceland is giving the world a unique look at how the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 is spreading. The Nordic island nation of 360,000 started testing for the virus in February, and it chose to test both people suspected of having COVID-19 and, notably, people who haven't shown any symptoms. DeCODE, a biotech company working on behalf of Iceland's chief epidemiologist, is testing the general population; so far, it has screened about 9,000 people, or about half of the 17,900 Icelanders tested for the virus, CNN reports.

  • US sends warships to Caribbean to stop illegal drugs
    BBC

    US sends warships to Caribbean to stop illegal drugs

    The US says it is sending warships to the Caribbean to stop illegal drugs. "We must not let the drug cartels exploit the [coronavirus] pandemic to threaten American lives," President Donald Trump said. The move comes a week after the US charged Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro and other senior officials in the country with "narco-terrorism".

  • California appears to be flattening the curve. But its testing lags behind other states
    The Guardian

    California appears to be flattening the curve. But its testing lags behind other states

    California has not seen the surge in coronavirus cases that have overwhelmed cities like New York and Detroit in the past week, which suggests that the state's early and restrictive shelter-in-place orders could be slowing the virus' spread. California implemented the earliest and strictest orders to stay at home in the United States in mid-March, and as of Wednesday, that were 8,584 confirmed Covid-19 cases and 183 deaths in the state compared to the 76,000 cases and 1,714 deaths in New York. Dr Deborah Birx, the White House's coronavirus task force coordinator, said on Tuesday that she was “reassured by what California has been able to do” to help control the virus with physical distancing orders.

  • Coronavirus live updates: US toll tops 5,100 after deadliest day yet; Florida, 3 other states issue stay-at-home orders; CDC considers masks
    USA TODAY

    Coronavirus live updates: US toll tops 5,100 after deadliest day yet; Florida, 3 other states issue stay-at-home orders; CDC considers masks

    The U.S. recorded its deadliest day – more than 1,000 fatalities – since the coronavirus outbreak began, more than 215,000 overall infections have been reported, and public health officials may recommend that more Americans wear face masks to combat the pandemic that has brought the global economy to its knees. "Even if you do wear a mask, it can't be at the expense of social distancing," Surgeon General Jerome Adams said. The current U.S. death toll appears to be a tiny fraction of what the nation faces over the next few weeks, public health officials say.

  • 28 Texas spring breakers who just returned from Cabo have tested positive for the coronavirus
    Business Insider

    28 Texas spring breakers who just returned from Cabo have tested positive for the coronavirus

    Victor Ruiz Garcia/Reuters Twenty-eight Texas spring breakers who recently vacationed in Cabo have tested positive for the coronavirus, tweeted Tony Plohetski of local station KVUE-TV. They chartered a plane with 70 people to get to Cabo, he said. Spring breakers, who are Gen Z, have been called out for crowding beaches and partying on booze cruises and ignoring calls for social distancing during the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Putin working remotely after meeting infected doctor: Kremlin
    AFP

    Putin working remotely after meeting infected doctor: Kremlin

    Russian leader Vladimir Putin has decided to handle his duties remotely, the Kremlin said Wednesday, after the head of the country's main coronavirus hospital tested positive following a meeting with the president. Denis Protsenko, who met with Putin last week as the Russian leader visited the Kommunarka hospital in Moscow, said Tuesday he had been infected with the coronavirus but was feeling well. "The president prefers these days to work remotely," Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told journalists, shortly before Putin was due to hold a cabinet meeting by videoconference.

  • Stabbing of Asian-American 2-Year-Old and Her Family Was a Virus-Fueled Hate Crime: Feds
    The Daily Beast

    Stabbing of Asian-American 2-Year-Old and Her Family Was a Virus-Fueled Hate Crime: Feds

    The vicious stabbing of an Asian-American family, including a 2-year-old girl, at a Sam's Club in Texas earlier this month has been deemed a hate crime by the feds, as authorities continue to raise alarm bells about a potential surge in racially motivated crimes amid the coronavirus outbreak. Jose L. Gomez, 19, confessed to authorities that he attempted to murder three Asian-American family members, including the toddler and a 6-year-old, on March 14 at the Midland, Texas store, according to the Midland Police Department.