The cheapest apartments for rent in Broad Ripple, Indianapolis

6184 Carvel Ave. | Photos: Zumper

Broad Ripple is very walkable, is convenient for biking and has a few nearby public transportation options, according to Walk Score's rating system.

So what does the low-end rent on a rental in Broad Ripple look like these days — and what might you get for the price?

We took a look at local listings in Broad Ripple via rental sites Zumper and Apartment Guide to find out what budget-minded apartment seekers can expect to find in this Indianapolis neighborhood.

Take a look at the cheapest listings available right now, below. (Note: Prices and availability are subject to change.)

Hoodline offers data-driven analysis of local happenings and trends across cities. Links included in this article may earn Hoodline a commission on clicks and transactions.

5910 Carrollton Ave.

Photo: Zumper

Listed at $950/month, this 796-square-foot two-bedroom, one-bathroom apartment is located at 5910 Carrollton Ave.

The apartment comes with hardwood flooring and central heating. Pet owners, take heed: This rental is both dog-friendly and cat-friendly. The listing specifies a $950 security deposit.

(See the complete listing here.)

6184 Carvel Ave.

Photo: Zumper
Photo: Zumper

This two-bedroom, one-bathroom dwelling, situated at 6184 Carvel Ave., is listed for $1,200/month for its 1,000 square feet.

In the unit, anticipate hardwood flooring, a deck and central heating and air conditioning. Amenities offered in the building include on-site laundry. Pet lovers are in luck: This rental is both dog-friendly and cat-friendly.

(See the complete listing here.)

6163 Norwaldo Ave.

Photo: Zumper
Photo: Zumper

Then there's this 1,830-square-foot dwelling with two bedrooms and one bathroom at 6163 Norwaldo Ave., listed at $1,450/month.

The residence comes with hardwood flooring and a deck. Pets are not welcome. Building amenities include garage parking, outdoor space and additional storage space. Future tenants needn't worry about a leasing fee.

(See the listing here.)

This story was created automatically using local real estate data from Zumper and Apartment Guide, then reviewed by an editor. Click here for more about what we're doing. Additionally, if you’re an agent or a broker, read on for real estate marketing ideas to promote your local listing.

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