Cheat Codes Will Be Amping Up Their Tour

KEVI, Trevor Dahl and Matthew Russell of Cheat Codes explain how they are taking their tour to the next level and how they keep the show exciting for not only their audiences, but themselves.

  • In reversal, Trump uses Defense Production Act to force GM to make ventilators
    Yahoo News

    In reversal, Trump uses Defense Production Act to force GM to make ventilators

    President Trump on Friday ended nine days of equivocating over whether to deploy the Defense Production Act, announcing that he would use his presidential powers under the legislation to compel General Motors to produce ventilators for the U.S. medical system. The White House released a statement by Trump saying he had signed a memorandum instructing the Department of Health and Human Services to “use any and all authority available under the Defense Production Act to require General Motors to accept, perform, and prioritize Federal contracts for ventilators.” In invoking the act, Trump blamed GM for the delays.

  • Americans stranded in India fear for their safety and wonder when they can return home
    Yahoo News

    Americans stranded in India fear for their safety and wonder when they can return home

    Firefighter and paramedic Michael Cannon and nurse Rose Barnes told Yahoo News they traveled to New Delhi March 13 on what should have been one of the happiest trips of their life, to bring the two-and-a-half year old girl home with them to Murrieta, Calif. But instead, they faced suspicion from locals and are now stuck in India awaiting news on when they can return home, and whether the child they hoped to welcome into their family can accompany them. India issued its official first day of a nationwide lockdown on March 25, with police enforcing the strict measures on its 1.3 billion people. Prime Minister Narendra Modi said the “total lockdown” was to “save India, to save its citizens, your family.”

  • The coronavirus pandemic is straining hospitals, but many medical school grads can't get jobs
    Yahoo News Video

    The coronavirus pandemic is straining hospitals, but many medical school grads can't get jobs

    The number of medical school graduates is increasing faster than the number of residency slots, thanks in part to a cap on federal funding for residency programs that has been in place for over 20 years. Without securing a residency, medical school graduates cannot go on to become physicians. Some find themselves in their mid-20s with hundreds of thousands of dollars in debt after eight years of higher education, earning a living driving for car services or as baristas.

  • German health institute warns pandemic could overstretch system -paper
    Reuters

    German health institute warns pandemic could overstretch system -paper

    Germany's health system could face strains similar to those in Italy if the coronavirus outbreak in the country worsens, the head of the Robert Koch Institute (RKI), the federal agency responsible for disease control, told a newspaper. Lothar Wieler's comments came as RKI data on Sunday showed the number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Germany had risen to 52,547 and 389 people had died of the disease there. "We cannot rule out that we will have more patients than ventilators in this country ... Of course, we must expect that the capacities will not be sufficient," Wieler told Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung.

  • Fact check: Could your December cough actually have been coronavirus? Experts say more research is needed
    USA TODAY

    Fact check: Could your December cough actually have been coronavirus? Experts say more research is needed

    A handful of widely circulated Facebook posts have asserted that people in the United States likely contracted the coronavirus as early as last fall. Many of the posts currently circulating include the profile photo of a Facebook user named Donna Lee Collier. "Our area has had a very virulent 'flu' season with many of my friends testing negative for flu," she said in a Facebook message.

  • Asia virus latest: People return to China epicentre, security talks off
    AFP

    Asia virus latest: People return to China epicentre, security talks off

    Here are the latest developments from Asia related to the novel coronavirus pandemic: - Wuhan eases travel rules - Wuhan, the central Chinese city where the coronavirus first emerged last year, partly reopened on Saturday after more than two months of near total isolation for its population of 11 million. People are now allowed to enter the city but not leave. AFP saw crowds of passengers arriving at Wuhan railway station, most wheeling suitcases alongside them.

  • AP Sources: Alleged Maduro co-conspirator is in DEA custody
    Associated Press

    AP Sources: Alleged Maduro co-conspirator is in DEA custody

    But he was charged Thursday with allegedly running with Maduro, socialist party boss Diosdado Cabello and another retired army general a narcoterrorist conspiracy that U.S. prosecutors say sent 250 metric tons of cocaine a year to the U.S. and turned the Venezuelan state into a platform for violent cartels and Colombia rebels. The Justice Department had offered a $10 million reward for Alcalá's arrest. Alcalá was being flown on a chartered plane to the U.S. from Barranquilla, Colombia, after waiving an extradition hearing and agreeing to collaborate with prosecutors, said the four people, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss actions that had not yet been made public.

  • Boris Johnson's government is reportedly furious with China and believes it could have 40 times more coronavirus cases than it claims
    Business Insider

    Boris Johnson's government is reportedly furious with China and believes it could have 40 times more coronavirus cases than it claims

    REUTERS/Aly Song UK government officials say there'll be "reckoning" for China over its handling of the coronavirus. Boris Johnson's government is reportedly furious with the Chinese state. It has accused of China of spreading disinformation and lying about the number of cases it has.

  • Coronavirus Comes to the Kremlin
    The Daily Beast

    Coronavirus Comes to the Kremlin

    Russian media reported that two Kremlin officials may have tested positive for the coronavirus. President Vladimir Putin's spokesman Dmitry Peskov confirmed he was aware of one of those cases, but claimed no knowledge of the second. State media outlet TASS speculated that one of the infected persons may have been a staffer responsible for awards, who traveled to Spain and later attended Putin's presidential awards ceremony in occupied Crimea.

  • New Yahoo News/YouGov coronavirus poll: 59 percent of Americans say Trump's Easter timeline is 'too soon' to restart economy
    Yahoo News

    New Yahoo News/YouGov coronavirus poll: 59 percent of Americans say Trump's Easter timeline is 'too soon' to restart economy

    A large majority of Americans disagree with President Trump that the nation's battle against the coronavirus is winding down and that normal economic activity should resume sooner rather than later, according to a new Yahoo News/YouGov poll — and that divide appears to be eroding public trust in Trump's leadership during the pandemic. As the virus continues to spread exponentially — the U.S. now leads the world in cases, with more than 85,000 — the poll found that 59 percent of Americans think that Easter, which falls on April 12, is too soon to “open the country up for business,” even though the president has repeatedly said he hopes to do just that.

  • Woman who coughed on $35K worth of grocery store food faces felony charges
    NBC News

    Woman who coughed on $35K worth of grocery store food faces felony charges

    A woman who played a "twisted prank" at a Pennsylvania grocery store Wednesday by purposely coughing on about $35,000 worth of food that had to be thrown out, was charged with four felonies, including counts of making terrorist threats, police said "Today was a very challenging day," Joe Fasula wrote Wednesday on the Facebook page of the Gerrity's supermarket chain, which he co-owns. "A woman, who the police know to be a chronic problem in the community," walked into the chain's Hanover Township store and "proceeded to purposely cough on our fresh produce, and a small section of our bakery, meat case and grocery," Fasula said.

  • Coronavirus lockdown in India: ‘Beaten and abused for doing my job’
    BBC

    Coronavirus lockdown in India: ‘Beaten and abused for doing my job’

    India's prime minister, Narendra Modi, suddenly announced on 23 March that the entire country would be put under lockdown. This left many delivery services and vendors of essential services unprepared, leading to confusion and clashes between police and their staff in many areas. Suresh Shah and his brother, Ramprasad, have been selling vegetables in the Delhi suburb of Noida for more than 15 years.

  • Moscow says coronavirus outbreak enters new phase as residents go out to brave risk
    Reuters

    Moscow says coronavirus outbreak enters new phase as residents go out to brave risk

    Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin said on Sunday that the coronavirus outbreak had entered a new phase as the total number of cases in the Russian capital exceeded 1,000 with many Muscovites going out despite a plea to stay home. Authorities in Moscow, Russia's worst-affected area, shut shops and entertainment venues from Saturday and urged Muscovites to stay at home during the non-working week announced by President Vladimir Putin. But at least 52,000 people took walks in the city parks on Saturday, and many elderly people made long trips on the city's vast public transportation network, Sobyanin said on his website.

  • NYC nurse on coronavirus front lines dies from COVID-19 after texting sister 'I'm okay'
    USA TODAY

    NYC nurse on coronavirus front lines dies from COVID-19 after texting sister 'I'm okay'

    A nurse on the front line of battling the coronavirus pandemic in New York has died from complication from the virus. Mount Sinai West emergency room nurse Kious Kelly, 48, died Tuesday after fighting COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus. Kelly's sister, Marya Patrice Sherron, told The New York Times that her brother had asthma but was otherwise well.

  • 'Extraordinary' recovery: 101-year-old Italian man with COVID-19 was released from the hospital
    INSIDER

    'Extraordinary' recovery: 101-year-old Italian man with COVID-19 was released from the hospital

    A 101-year-old man has been released from the hospital in Rimini, Italy, after recovering from the coronavirus. The man, identified only as "Mr. P.," was admitted to the hospital last week. A 101-year-old Italian man has recovered from COVID-19 and his city's deputy mayor said the story provides "hope for the future," CNN reported.

  • Venezuelan ex-general surrenders to US on drug trafficking charges
    AFP

    Venezuelan ex-general surrenders to US on drug trafficking charges

    A retired Venezuelan general who was charged by the United States with "narco-terrorism" along with President Nicolas Maduro and other officials has surrendered in Colombia to US authorities, prosecutors said Saturday. "The national Attorney General learned that Mr Cliver Alcala surrendered to US authorities," the Colombian prosecutor said in a statement, adding there was no arrest warrant when he gave himself up. Alcala turned himself in on Friday to the Colombians, who in turn handed him over to US authorities, the El Tiempo de Bogota newspaper said.

  • Trump tells Hannity he doesn’t believe New York needs 30,000 ventilators to fight coronavirus
    Yahoo News Video

    Trump tells Hannity he doesn’t believe New York needs 30,000 ventilators to fight coronavirus

    In an interview on Fox News, President Trump told host Sean Hannity that he doesn't believe places like New York need 30,000 ventilators.

  • Stay In the Lines With These Neat Science Coloring Pages
    Popular Mechanics

    Stay In the Lines With These Neat Science Coloring Pages

    No money required—all you need is a printer and some colored pencils. From Popular Mechanics

  • Trump tweets blame in all directions over ventilators for coronavirus, except at himself
    Yahoo News

    Trump tweets blame in all directions over ventilators for coronavirus, except at himself

    Hours after a Fox News interview in which he downplayed a national shortage of hospital ventilators to treat patients infected with the coronavirus, President Trump fired off a number of tweets Friday blaming General Motors and its CEO, Mary Barra, for not manufacturing more of them. The president explained in a later tweet that “P” stood for the Defense Production Act, which many U.S. governors have been demanding Trump use to compel businesses to produce badly needed medical supplies and equipment. Although he invoked the act as a standby, Trump hasn't issued any specific orders under it, claiming that just the threat of it has prompted companies to step up production on their own.

  • Senator says White House turned down emergency coronavirus funding in early February
    Yahoo News

    Senator says White House turned down emergency coronavirus funding in early February

    Sen. Chris Murphy, a Connecticut Democrat, says that Trump administration officials declined an offer of early congressional funding assistance that he and other senators made on Feb. 5 during a meeting to discuss the coronavirus. The officials, including Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, said they “didn't need emergency funding, that they would be able to handle it within existing appropriations,” Murphy recalled in an interview with Yahoo News' “Skullduggery” podcast. “What an awful, horrible catastrophic mistake that was,” Murphy said.

  • Without any interventions like social distancing, one model predicts the coronavirus could have killed 40 million people this year
    Business Insider

    Without any interventions like social distancing, one model predicts the coronavirus could have killed 40 million people this year

    Without intense government intervention, the novel coronavirus could infect 7 billion people and kill 40 million this year, according to a new report from researchers at the Imperial College of London. Without implementing strategies like lockdowns to reduce the spread of the novel coronavirus, there would have been 7 billion infections and 40 million deaths in 2020 alone, according to a report published Thursday from researchers at the Imperial College of London. The report, according to co-author Charles Whittaker, is meant to project the impact of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

  • Reuters

    Prisoner serving time for drug charge is first U.S. inmate to die from COVID-19

    Patrick Jones, a 49-year-old prisoner in Louisiana who was serving a 27-year prison term for a drug charge, became the first federal inmate to die from COVID-19, the federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) announced late on Saturday. A total of 14 inmates and 13 staff in federal prisons across the United States have fallen ill with the virus, according to the BOP's website. Jones was serving his prison sentence at a low security facility in Oakdale, Louisiana, and first developed symptoms on March 19, the BOP said.

  • 'Off the charts': Virus hot spots grow in middle America
    Associated Press

    'Off the charts': Virus hot spots grow in middle America

    The coronavirus continued its unrelenting spread across the United States with fatalities doubling in two days and authorities saying Saturday that an infant who tested positive had died. It pummeled big cities like New York, Detroit, New Orleans and Chicago, and made its way, too, into rural America as hotspots erupted in small Midwestern towns and Rocky Mountain ski havens. Worldwide infections surpassed the 660,000 mark with more than 30,000 deaths as new cases also stacked up quickly in Europe, according to a tally by Johns Hopkins University.

  • Catholics allowed to eat meat on Lenten Fridays
    NBC News

    Catholics allowed to eat meat on Lenten Fridays

    Some Roman Catholic bishops around the country are relieving the faithful of giving up meat on Fridays since they're already deprived of some foods and other pleasures during the coronavirus pandemic. During Lent, the about six weeks between Ash Wednesday to Holy Thursday, many Catholics practice self-denial and sacrifice as they repent their sins and pray in preparation for Easter. Some choose certain pleasures to give up for the full 40 days, and all Christians are instructed not to eat meat on Ash Wednesday, and all Fridays during Lent in addition to Good Friday.

  • Hubei, the center of China's coronavirus outbreak, has emerged from a months-long coronavirus lockdown. Photos show the province slowly coming back to life.
    INSIDER

    Hubei, the center of China's coronavirus outbreak, has emerged from a months-long coronavirus lockdown. Photos show the province slowly coming back to life.

    Life is slowly returning to normal in the Hubei province in China, after its government announced on March 25 that it would lift travel restrictions on residents after more than two months of lockdown. Photos show what life is like on-the-ground for residents of the Hubei district, who are slowly getting used to life outside their homes again. All eyes are on Hubei, China, the one-time of the coronavirus outbreak, after it announced on March 25 that it would start lifting travel restrictions on its residents after months of lockdown.