‘Cheers, Texas!’ Governor Greg Abbott signs alcohol to-go into law

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Alcohol to-go in Texas is here to stay, after Gov. Greg Abbott signed a law making the pandemic practice permanent.

During COVID-19, restaurants have been able to sell drinks to-go to, offering an additional source of revenue for the businesses. House Bill 1024, signed by Abbott Wednesday, will allow Texans to keep picking up their favorite cocktails to enjoy at home.

The law goes into effect immediately, according to a spokesperson for Sen. Kelly Hancock, a North Richland Hills Republican and the bill’s Senate sponsor.

“Today is a great day for Texas restaurants, as well as for their customers as I am about to sign a law that allows restaurants to sell alcohol to-go,” Abbott said in a video shared on Twitter, flanked by Hancock and bill author Rep. Charlie Geren, R-Fort Worth. “During the course of the pandemic, to help restaurants be able to better deal with the pandemic, we waived a regulation to allow restaurants to sell alcohol to-go. Well, it turned out that Texans liked it so much, the Texas legislature wanted to make that permanent law in the state of Texas.”

The law permits restaurants with a food and beverage certificate and a mixed beverage permit to sell alcoholic beverages with food orders for pick-up and delivery. The drinks would have to be in a tamper-proof container and must also show valid ID when picking up or receiving a delivery, according to the bill.

The bill passed out of the House in March and the Senate in April before heading to Abbott’s desk.

“This is a tremendous win for our recovering restaurant and hospitality industry, and I’m honored to have had the opportunity to carry this legislation. Cheers, Texas!,” Geren said in a Wednesday tweet.

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