Chicago Mayor Lightfoot announces extra safety measures ahead of 2nd weekend of protests, including road closures and CTA changes

Ahead of Chicago's second consecutive weekend of protests, Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced extra measures to protect demonstrators and businesses.

  • Japan is 'shocked' and furious at the US after a major coronavirus outbreak at 2 Marine bases in Okinawa — and says the US is not taking the virus seriously
    Business Insider

    Japan is 'shocked' and furious at the US after a major coronavirus outbreak at 2 Marine bases in Okinawa — and says the US is not taking the virus seriously

    Japanese authorities say they are "shocked" after a significant coronavirus outbreak at two US Marine bases in the country. 61 Marines have been infected with the virus in recent days, spread across two bases in Okinawa prefecture, home to about 26,000 US service personnel. "We now have strong doubts that the US military has taken adequate disease prevention measures," Okinawa governor Denny Tamaki said at a press conference.

  • On fifth attempt, U.N. Security Council renews Syria aid via Turkey
    Reuters

    On fifth attempt, U.N. Security Council renews Syria aid via Turkey

    The United Nations Security Council on Saturday approved aid deliveries to Syria through one border crossing from Turkey, a day after its authorization for the six-year-long humanitarian operation ended, leaving millions of Syrian civilians in limbo. The United Nations describes the aid delivered from Turkey as a "lifeline" for Syrians in the country's northwest. The 15-member council had been deadlocked, with most members pitted against Syrian allies Russia and China, which abstained on Saturday in the council's fifth vote this week on the issue.

  • The White House Made a List of All the Times Fauci ‘Has Been Wrong’ on the Coronavirus
    The Daily Beast

    The White House Made a List of All the Times Fauci ‘Has Been Wrong’ on the Coronavirus

    The White House has undertaken behind-the-scenes efforts in recent months to undercut and sideline Dr. Anthony Fauci—even going so far as to compile a list of all the times he “has been wrong on things,” according to The Washington Post. After canceling some of his planned TV appearances and keeping him away from the Oval Office, White House officials and President Trump have taken to publicly expressing a loss of confidence in the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and face of the administration's coronavirus task force. The apparent attempts to undermine Fauci come as he continues to counter the president's overly optimistic narrative on the state of the pandemic.

  • University professors fear returning to campus as coronavirus cases surge
    NBC News

    University professors fear returning to campus as coronavirus cases surge

    However, professors were initially required to return to campus to teach in person and there wasn't an option to work remotely. The university later put in place a policy where faculty could file a request to work remotely, but there wasn't a guarantee that the request would be accommodated. Boston University philosophy professors Daniel Star and Russell Powell wrote an open letter to the university urging it to allow professors to make their own decisions about returning to campus.

  • Attorneys for Breonna Taylor's family allege that police targeted her residence as part of a Louisville gentrification plan
    INSIDER

    Attorneys for Breonna Taylor's family allege that police targeted her residence as part of a Louisville gentrification plan

    Attorneys for the family of Breonna Taylor, a 26-year-old emergency medical technician who was killed by police in Louisville, Kentucky, alleged in a new filing that officers were operating under information from an aggressive gentrification campaign in targeting Taylor's residence. The warrant was connected to a suspect who did not live at Taylor's apartment, and no drugs were found at the residence. "While there is no doubt that gentrification of west Louisville neighborhoods could be a very good thing, the methods employed to do so have been unlawful and unconscionable," attorneys said in the complaint.

  • City mulls razing site where 1st Alaska flag flew
    Associated Press

    City mulls razing site where 1st Alaska flag flew

    The fate of one of Alaska's most historic yet neglected structures could be decided Monday as city officials in Seward weigh whether to demolish a former Methodist boarding school where the Alaska territorial flag was first flown almost a century ago and where its Alaska Native designer lived. Benny Benson was among the orphans and displaced children who lived at the Jesse Lee Home, many of whom were sent there after the Spanish flu devastated Alaska Native villages. Benson, a 13-year-old Aleut boy sent to the home after his mother died of the flu, won a territory-wide contest in 1927 to design the flag, which became the state flag after statehood was granted in 1959.

  • Coronavirus can damage the heart, major study finds
    The Telegraph

    Coronavirus can damage the heart, major study finds

    Coronavirus can damage the heart, with more than half of hospitalised patients revealing abnormal scans, a major new study has found. A survey of 69 countries, funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF), found that 55 per cent of 1,261 patients studied had abnormal changes to the way their heart was pumping, with around one in seven showing evidence of severe dysfunction. The majority (901 patients) had never been diagnosed with heart problems before, leading scientists to conclude that Covid-19 itself may seriously affect the heart.

  • Coronavirus: Florida sets new state daily case record of 15,299
    BBC

    Coronavirus: Florida sets new state daily case record of 15,299

    Florida has registered a state record of 15,299 new coronavirus cases in 24 hours - around a quarter of all of the United States' daily infections. The state, with just 7% of the US population, surpassed the previous daily record held by California. Florida, which began lifting coronavirus restrictions in May, has proved vulnerable due to tourism and an elderly population.

  • Giant protests in Russia after popular governor's arrest
    AFP

    Giant protests in Russia after popular governor's arrest

    At least 10,000 protesters marched through the eastern Russian city of Khabarovsk Saturday in support of a popular local governor arrested this week for allegedly ordering several murders. A court in Moscow on Friday ruled to hold 50-year-old Sergei Furgal for two months pending trial for the murders of several businessmen 15 years ago. Furgal's nationalist Liberal-Democratic Party has thrown its weight behind the governor, and on Saturday said "35,000 people came out to the streets" in Khabarovsk to protest his arrest.

  • A revival of ultrafast supersonic passenger jet travel is inching closer to reality – take a look at the prototype debuting in October
    Business Insider

    A revival of ultrafast supersonic passenger jet travel is inching closer to reality – take a look at the prototype debuting in October

    Boom Supersonic Aircraft start-up Boom Supersonic is one step closer to bringing back supersonic passenger travel with its flagship Overture jet. The Overture's prototype and demonstrator, the XB-1, will be unveiled in October and plans to take to the skies in 2021. If the XB-1 has a successful test flight program, the Overture could fly within the next 10 years, bringing back supersonic travel to the public.

  • Pope 'very pained' by decision to turn Istanbul's Hagia Sophia museum into mosque
    Reuters

    Pope 'very pained' by decision to turn Istanbul's Hagia Sophia museum into mosque

    Pope Francis said on Sunday he was hurt by Turkey's decision to make Istanbul's Hagia Sophia museum a mosque, the latest religious leader to condemn the move. Turkish President Tayyip Erdogan has said the first prayers would be held in Hagia Sophia on July 24, after declaring the ancient monument was once again a mosque following a court ruling revoking its status as a museum.

  • Couple who threatened Black Lives Matter protesters with guns once destroyed children's beehives
    Yahoo News Video

    Couple who threatened Black Lives Matter protesters with guns once destroyed children's beehives

    St. Louis couple Mark and Patricia McCloskey drew national attention in June when they flashed guns at Black Lives Matter protesters walking down their street.

  • Trump wears mask in public setting for the first time during visit to hospital
    NBC News

    Trump wears mask in public setting for the first time during visit to hospital

    President Donald Trump on Saturday wore a mask in a public setting for the first time since the coronavirus pandemic struck the nation in earnest in March. Trump wore a black mask during a visit to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. In a visit to a Ford vehicle manufacturing plant in Ypsilanti, Michigan, on May 21, the company said it made its mandatory mask policy clear to the White House, but Trump wore one only part of tour, and not in front of cameras.

  • South Africa's 9 million smokers were faced with cold turkey when the government banned cigarette sales in March as a coronavirus measure. Now Big Tobacco is fighting back.
    INSIDER

    South Africa's 9 million smokers were faced with cold turkey when the government banned cigarette sales in March as a coronavirus measure. Now Big Tobacco is fighting back.

    earlier in July. South Africa's government had also banned the sale of alcohol but has since eased that restriction, which according to an AP report, has led to an increase in "drunken brawls and traffic accidents, putting added strain on hospitals as they deal with the virus." Reuters FITA is also arguing that by banning the legal sale of cigarettes, the South African government is encouraging a black market trade, and putting thousands of jobs at risk.

  • Justice Dept. seeks to overturn order halting execution
    Associated Press

    Justice Dept. seeks to overturn order halting execution

    The Justice Department filed an emergency motion with a federal appeals court on Saturday seeking to move forward with the first federal execution in nearly two decades. Daniel Lee, 47, had been scheduled to die by lethal injection on Monday at a federal prison in Indiana. He was convicted in Arkansas of the 1996 killings of gun dealer William Mueller, his wife, Nancy, and her 8-year-old daughter, Sarah Powell.

  • Victory to the Sioux: Proud tribe defeats major oil firm backed by Trump
    The Telegraph

    Victory to the Sioux: Proud tribe defeats major oil firm backed by Trump

    LaDonna Brave Bull Allard grins broadly as she contemplates the significance of the victory she and other members of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe have just secured. The tribe began a bitter battle against an oil company and the federal government in 2016, when the Dakota Access pipeline was built on their doorstep, threatening their water supply. It is not often that a Native American tribe with scant resources defeats a major oil company, not least one that has the backing of the US president.

  • Xu Zhangrun: Outspoken professor freed after six days
    BBC

    Xu Zhangrun: Outspoken professor freed after six days

    An outspoken critic of China's rulers, Professor Xu Zhangrun, has been released after six days in police custody, friends say. The Beijing constitutional law professor was already under house arrest when he was detained on 6 July. He had criticised China's response to coronavirus and what he sees as a Mao-like cult of personality under China's current leader, Xi Jinping.

  • UN fails to find consensus after Russia, China veto on Syrian aid
    AFP

    UN fails to find consensus after Russia, China veto on Syrian aid

    The UN Security Council failed to find a consensus on prolonging cross-border humanitarian aid to Syria on Friday after Russia and China vetoed an extension and members rejected a counter proposal by Moscow. Without an agreement, authorization for the transport of aid to war-torn Syria, which has existed since 2014, expired Friday night. Germany and Belgium were working on a final initiative to save the effort, with hopes of bringing it to a vote this weekend.

  • Caribbean countries are selling citizenship for as low as $100,000 — here's how the ultra-wealthy are cashing in to avoid pandemic travel restrictions
    Business Insider

    Caribbean countries are selling citizenship for as low as $100,000 — here's how the ultra-wealthy are cashing in to avoid pandemic travel restrictions

    Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images Secondary passports are in high demand as the coronavirus pandemic causes travel restrictions around the world. In the Caribbean, some nations are offering steep discounts to bring in extra revenue amid a cash crunch. Passport buying has shifted from simple vacations to riding out the virus, experts say.

  • Incumbent Duda extends lead in Polish election cliffhanger
    Reuters

    Incumbent Duda extends lead in Polish election cliffhanger

    Incumbent Andrzej Duda's lead in Poland's presidential election widened further, an updated late poll showed on Monday, a result, which while still uncertain, could have profound implications for Warsaw's relations with the European Union. The updated late poll combines exit poll data with official results for 90% of the polling stations that took part in the exit poll. The re-election of Duda, an ally of the ruling nationalists Law and Justice (PiS), is crucial if the government is to implement in full its conservative agenda, including judicial reforms that the European Union says are undemocratic.

  • How to see Neowise before it disappears
    CBS News

    How to see Neowise before it disappears

    A newly-discovered comet is giving skywatchers quite the show during the month of July. Early risers may have already caught a glimpse of the comet Neowise as it streaks across the sky, but don't worry — some of the best viewing moments have yet to come. Astronomers discovered the comet, known as Comet C2020 F3 NEOWISE, back in March.

  • Fire ravages 249-year-old Spanish mission in Southern California
    NBC News

    Fire ravages 249-year-old Spanish mission in Southern California

    No injuries were reported, and fire officials were trying to determine what caused the fire. Founded in 1771 by Franciscan priest Junipero Serra, from Spain, the San Gabriel Mission is considered a historical landmark for many faithful in Southern California. But Serra's legacy remains a flashpoint for many Native Americans and Latinos who condemn the colonization and brutalization of Indigenous populations in the region.

  • ‘Racist, hurtful and deeply inappropriate.’ California CEO resigns after racist rant
    Miami Herald

    ‘Racist, hurtful and deeply inappropriate.’ California CEO resigns after racist rant

    A Silicon Valley tech CEO has resigned over a viral video of his ejection from a California restaurant for his racist tirade directed at an Asian family celebrating a birthday. “I have once again begun my journey back to sobriety and have enrolled in an anti-racist program with immediate effect,” said former Solid8 CEO Michael Lofthouse in a statement Saturday, reported The San Francisco Chronicle. “My comments towards the families involved were racist, hurtful and deeply inappropriate,” Lofthouse said, according to the publication.

  • Associated Press

    Pakistan says 4 troops, 4 militants killed in shootout in NW

    Pakistan's military on Sunday said four soldiers and four militants were killed during a shootout in the rugged northwestern region of North Waziristan, which borders Afghanistan. A statement from the military's public relations wing said the exchange of fire took place after the army personnel had surrounded the militant hideout early Sunday. The statement did not identify the militants, but Pakistan's military has been battling members of the Pakistani Taliban group, known as the Tehreek-e-Taliban (TTP) in that region for years.

  • Coronavirus Testing Czar Pushes Back on Trump’s Criticism of CDC Guidelines
    The Daily Beast

    Coronavirus Testing Czar Pushes Back on Trump’s Criticism of CDC Guidelines

    Adm. Brett Giroir, the Assistant Secretary for Health who also leads the administration's coronavirus testing efforts, on Sunday seemingly pushed back against President Donald Trump's recent criticism of the Centers for Disease Control's guidelines for reopening schools this fall. Last week, amid his aggressive pressure campaign to force all local school districts to fully reopen this fall despite a massive surge in coronavirus cases, President Donald Trump complained that the CDC's guidance on safely reopening schools was “very tough” and “expensive.” Despite Vice President Mike Pence suggesting new recommendations would be issued in the following days, CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield contradicted the White House, noting that while there would be “additional reference documents” those documents “are not a revision of the guidelines.”