Chilling new riot video

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Ashley Shaffer, USA TODAY
·5 min read
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

Democrats say they have “cold, hard facts” to prove former President Donald Trump incited the deadly insurrection. Mark Cuban isn't feeling the national anthem. And a friendly reminder that double-masking is CDC-approved.

It's Ashley. Let's do the news thing.

But first, COVID who? A French nun who is Europe's oldest person survived COVID-19 – and seems pretty nonchalant about the whole situation a day before her 117th birthday.

The Short List is a snappy USA TODAY news roundup. Subscribe here!

To convict or not to convict?

House impeachment managers wielded Trump's words against him Wednesday during his Senate impeachment trial, arguing that he spent weeks fueling the rage behind the Capitol riot Jan. 6, then "reveled in" the mayhem and destruction. The managers, who act as prosecutors, pointed to Trump's remarks and Twitter messages in which he falsely claimed that the election Nov. 3 was stolen and urged his supporters to come to Washington on the day Congress was scheduled to formalize the election results.

New security footage shows Pence evacuating the Senate

Delegate Stacey Plaskett of the Virgin Islands, one of the Democratic House prosecutors, showed security footage detailing some close calls from the Capitol breach. One video showed Vice President Mike Pence as he was spirited out of the Senate chamber. Another showed Capitol Police officer Eugene Goodman running past Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, in a hallway and directing him to turn around. Romney turned and ran to safety. At times, the footage is hard to watch.

Other big moments

Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., opened Democrats' arguments by saying Trump was “no innocent bystander” in the violence at the Capitol. Rep. Eric Swalwell, D-Calif., quoted several of Trump’s tweets and statements claiming the election was stolen. Rep. Joe Neguse, D-Colo., said Trump told followers for months that he couldn’t lose the election unless there was massive fraud.

Will the new evidence work? TBD.

Most people expect Trump to be acquitted, but the Senate trial isn't just about the verdict. It's about Trump's political potency in the future, which many analysts predict will be weakened because of his efforts to overturn his election loss.

It's all still happening. You can follow along and get insider observations here.

What everyone’s talking about

Mark Cuban isn't feeling the national anthem

After Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban said the national anthem wouldn't be played before his team's home games – an overdue move that drew outrage and boycott threats – the NBA announced Wednesday that the anthem must be played as past of longstanding league policy. After the NBA's statement, Cuban said his team would comply moving forward. But as USA TODAY Sports' Dan Wolken writes, the league dropped the ball on the conversation as a whole.

Some lawmakers want to punish schools that teach the 1619 Project

Lawmakers in several states want to stop lesson plans that focus on slavery in American history as presented in The New York Times’ 1619 Project, previewing court battles over the control of civics education. Republican lawmakers in at least five states filed bills last month that, if enacted, would cut funding to schools and colleges that provide lessons derived from the award-winning project. Some historians say the bills are part of a larger effort by Republicans to glorify a more white and patriarchal view of American history that downplays the ugly legacy of slavery and the contributions of Black people, Native Americans, women and others to the nation’s founding. It’s unclear whether any of the anti-1619 Project bills will become law.

Students at Eastern Senior High School in Washington reflected on the 1619 Project.
Students at Eastern Senior High School in Washington reflected on the 1619 Project.

Real quick

Mask up, then mask again

One mask provides good protection against spreading the coronavirus, but two masks could offer more. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released research Wednesday that double-masking or wearing tightly fitted medical masks can reduce exposure to infectious aerosols up to 95% (ninety-five percent!). Do you double-mask? A majority of Americans haven't (61%), according to a poll.

How to wear a double mask comfortably: A surgical mask should sit over your nose, mouth and under the chin with no gaps on either side. Layering with the second mask of cotton fabric will keep the first mask snugly in place and provide added protection.

When double-masking, a tighter-fitting mask with ear loops or elastic band straps should be worn closest to the face. It will help filter the virus’ small aerosol droplets.
When double-masking, a tighter-fitting mask with ear loops or elastic band straps should be worn closest to the face. It will help filter the virus’ small aerosol droplets.

A break from the news

This is a compilation of stories from across the USA TODAY Network. Want this news roundup in your inbox every night? Sign up for The Short List newsletter here.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Trump impeachment trial, Mark Cuban, 1619, COVID-19: Wednesday's news