Chopper's Politics: Patriotism is one of the nation's greatest assets, says Shadow Foreign Secretary

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·3 min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
Lisa Nandy is a guest on the latest Chopper's Politics podcast ahead of the Labour Party conference this weekend - NEIL HALL/EPA-EFE/REX/REX
Lisa Nandy is a guest on the latest Chopper's Politics podcast ahead of the Labour Party conference this weekend - NEIL HALL/EPA-EFE/REX/REX

Labour needs to harness "a quiet patriotism that exists across this country that is a real force for good" Lisa Nandy says today as she throws her weight behind Sir Keir Starmer's Labour reforms.

The shadow foreign secretary said that it was wrong how being patriotic had been "appropriated" by the Right in British politics.

Ms Nandy said it was wrong that patriotism was now judged on how many union flags politicians could put on display in their offices.

She told today's Chopper's Politics podcast, which you can listen to using the audio player above: "Ministers rushed to the chamber when they were still wearing face masks with flags emblazoned all over them, trying to show how patriotic they were.

"But actually, there's a quiet patriotism that exists across this country that is a real force for good. It's one of the greatest assets that we've got."

Ms Nandy told how she had "interrupted a call with the UK ambassador to the United States a while ago to go and join a VE Day party in my street".

She added: "We had bunting out everywhere and people were having a great time. But we were also doing what we do best here in Wigan, we were pulling together as a community.

"We may not have big economic assets, but we have huge social assets."

The MP for Wigan admitted that Sir Keir had been mocked over his 11,500 word treatise on his political beliefs.

But she said the long essay was "really important because that's the only way we ever win elections - when we convince people that another future is possible".

Ms Nandy said Sir Keir was right to push for the changes of the one member, one vote system to an electoral college because they would let Labour "turn outwards" to the country.

She said: "He's right to take this opportunity, the first opportunity that he's had to make sure that we've got the right processes in the party so that we can turn outwards to the country.

"He's had a lot of flack for it, but actually, this is the first chance because we have to vote through rule changes at conference and we haven't had one since he became leader.

"He's trying to do two things. He's trying to make sure that the way we elect leaders is rooted in the interests of the people of this country."

She added the change would also "end the kind of slightly odd system that Jeremy Corbyn introduced, that was about trying to make it easier to get rid of your Labour MP".

Asked on the podcast if Sir Keir would have to resign if the changes were rejected by the conference delegates, she added: "I don't think it's a sort of Armageddon. Is the sky going to fall in? No, I don't think so at all."

Listen to Christopher Hope's full interview with Lisa Nandy, as well as conversations with DUP leader Sir Jeffrey Donaldson, and former Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt, on Chopper's Politics, The Telegraph's weekly political podcast, using the audio player above, on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting