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Chris Christie says GOP lawmakers' objection of electoral college certification 'will go nowhere'

Inyoung Choi
·2 min read
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Related: Trump still hasn't conceded— here's how other runner-ups have

Chris Christie said that Republican efforts to stop the certification of the Electoral College will "go nowhere."

"The thing that matters the most is the reason it will go nowhere is because there's been no evidence of widespread fraud," he said in an interview with ABC's "This Week" on Sunday. "And that's been determined by Republican and Democratic Governors across the country, it's been determined, most importantly, by the Republican Attorney General of the United Stated States Bill Barr who no one could say has not been a loyal fighter for the president"

Chris Christie
Former Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey. Lorenzo Bevilaqua/ABC via Getty Images

"The facts are the facts," the former Republican Governor of New Jersey said. "If there's evidence show us. There's been no evidence shown, and that's why Joe Biden will be confirmed next week."

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Following reports that at least 140 House Republicans plan to vote against the certification of the Electoral College on Wednesday, Vice President Mike Pence said he "welcomes" those who sought to raise objections to bring forward evidence, Business Insider's Kelsey Vlamis reported.

Several Republican lawmakers including Sen. Mitt Romney, Sen. Pat Toomey, and Sen. Lisa Murkowski have openly condemned their party colleagues.

"The egregious ploy to reject electors may enhance the political ambition of some, but dangerously threatens our Democratic Republic," Romney wrote in a statement released Sunday.

After Joe Biden won the presidential election in November, presidential electors of the Electoral College cumulatively cast a total of over 270 votes for the president-elect in December. Various state election officials, including Republican Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, in addition to former US Attorney General Bill Barr, have made clear that there has been no evidence of election fraud.

Meanwhile, the Trump campaign has, on a number of occasions, contested the election results without evidence while losing at least 40 lawsuits since the November election.

Read the original article on Business Insider