Christopher Meloni’s ‘SVU’ Character Is Getting His Own Spin-Off Series

Adrianna Freedman

From Men's Health

  • NBC recently announced that Law and Order: SVU alum Christopher Meloni will be reprising his role as Elliot Stabler in a new spinoff series.
  • The series will be centered around a NYPD crime unit led by Stabler.
  • This is the first series out of a five-year, multi-platform deal for the show's creator and Universal Television.

Attention Law and Order: SVU fans—one of your favorite characters is officially coming back to television. NBC recently announced that the television network has decided to give a 13-episode series order to an SVU spinoff, with Christopher Meloni reprising his role as Elliot Stabler.

According to a report from Deadline, the new drama will center around an NYPD crime unit run by Stabler. As the series will be set in New York—just like its predecessor show—there’s always a chance for crossovers and reunions with Olivia Benson (Mariska Hargitay) down the line. The show will be produced by Dick Wolf, famous for creating the Law and Order franchise, and its the first show to be picked up from the five-year, nine-figure multi-platform deal Wolf signed with Universal Television in February.

Although it's unclear when the series will air and what level of production its currently in, there’s a chance that the show will exist under the Law and Order umbrella, or otherwise become part of the SVU franchise.

Meloni’s Stabler quickly became a fan-favorite as the counterpart to Hargitay’s Benson during the show's first twelve seasons, with Meloni receiving an Emmy nomination for his portrayal of Stabler in 2006. He departed the series in 2011, when his character abruptly retired from working in the police force.

Since leaving the series, Meloni has popped up in various hit television shows, including True Blood, The Handmaid’s Tale, and Veep. As for Wolf, this is just another show to add to the empire his company, Wolf Entertainment, has with NBC. Along with SVU, Wolf is also the developer of the Chicago franchise, which include Chicago Fire, Chicago P.D., and Chicago Med. Wolf is also planning to add one more series to his cop franchise, titled Law and Order: Hate Crimes.

And for those wondering what Meloni has been up to while waiting for the series to film—let’s just say that he seems to be prepping for his new return to the force just fine.



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