Closing the digital divide on the Cattaraugus Territory with a broadband network initiative

Let's say you want to check Facebook, edit your resume or watch the latest viral video. If you live on the Cattaraugus Territory, internet access means traveling to the local library.

  • White House encourages hydroxychloroquine use for coronavirus again
    Yahoo News

    White House encourages hydroxychloroquine use for coronavirus again

    The White House continued on Thursday to promote the use of hydroxychloroquine, the antimalarial drug that President Trump and some of his supporters have held out as a treatment for the coronavirus, against the advice of the Food and Drug Administration and in the face of studies that have shown it can be harmful in some cases. Routinely touted by prominent conservative allies of the president, including primetime Fox News anchor Laura Ingraham, it has been denounced by members of the medical establishment as an unproven therapy that poses the risk of potentially fatal heart complications. The FDA recommends that COVID-19 patients, if they choose to use it, do so only in a hospital or under medical supervision in a clinical trial.

  • Republican lawmakers accused of hiding positive COVID-19 test result from Democrats, who call it 'immoral'
    Yahoo News

    Republican lawmakers accused of hiding positive COVID-19 test result from Democrats, who call it 'immoral'

    Democratic lawmakers in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives are demanding answers after learning that one of their Republican colleagues tested positive for COVID-19, shared that information with GOP leadership, but never informed them. On May 20, Republican Rep. Andrew Lewis learned he had tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Two other Republican House members who came in contact with Lewis were told to self-quarantine for 14 days, but Democratic lawmakers, some of whom also had contact with Lewis or with the two other Republicans before May 20, say they first learned of the positive test result on Wednesday.

  • ‘A murderer lives here': Grafitti scrawled outside home of white police officer who knelt on neck of George Floyd
    The Independent

    ‘A murderer lives here': Grafitti scrawled outside home of white police officer who knelt on neck of George Floyd

    Angry Minneapolis residents protesting the killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis Police Officer scrawled the phrase "A murderer lives here" on the road outside the officer's house Wednesday night. Mr Floyd was killed when Minneapolis Police Officer Derek Chauvin knelt on his neck for eight minutes, despite Mr Floyd crying out that he couldn't breathe. Officers claimed Mr Floyd was resisting arrest, but security footage from a nearby restaurant that captured the arrest shows Mr Floyd cooperating with the police before his death.

  • Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina Ashrafi
    The Telegraph

    Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina Ashrafi

    The killing of an Iranian teen by her father after she eloped with an older man sparked outrage on Wednesday, with local media denouncing "institutionalised violence" in "patriarchal" Iran. Iranian media covered the apparent "honour" crime extensively, with Ebtekar newspaper leading its front page with the headline "Unsafe father's house". According to local media, Romina Ashrafi was killed in her sleep on May 21 by her father, who decapitated her in the family home in Talesh in northern Gilan province.

  • Wisconsin reports record number of new coronavirus cases, deaths
    NBC News

    Wisconsin reports record number of new coronavirus cases, deaths

    Wisconsin saw a record number of new coronavirus cases and deaths reported in a single day on Wednesday, two weeks after the state's Supreme Court struck down its statewide stay-at-home order. The state reported 599 new known COVID-19 cases on Wednesday with 22 known deaths, according to Wisconsin's Department of Health Services, the highest recorded daily rise since the pandemic began there. As of Wednesday, the state had more than 16,460 known cases and 539 known deaths, according to the department.

  • Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? 
    Yahoo News

    Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? 

    While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says contaminated surfaces are not the main way the virus is transmitted, the agency hasn't ruled surfaces out as a possible mode of infection. “If you want a reliable way to prevent yourself from getting the coronavirus, worry less about the surfaces you touch, and worry more about how frequently you wash your hands,” says Dr. Dara Kass, a Yahoo News Medical Contributor and associate professor of emergency medicine at Columbia University Medical Center. Confusion over how the virus is transmitted was reignited last week when the CDC edited the “How COVID-19 Spreads” page on their COVID-19 website to mention contaminated surfaces and objects under a new heading entitled, “The virus does not spread easily in other ways.”

  • China plans to extend curbs on international flights until June 30: U.S. embassy
    Reuters

    China plans to extend curbs on international flights until June 30: U.S. embassy

    Chinese civil aviation authorities plan to extend until June 30 their curbs on international flights to contain the spread of the coronavirus, the U.S. embassy in Beijing said in a travel advisory on Friday. China has drastically cut such flights since March to allay concerns over infections brought by arriving passengers. A so-called "Five One" policy allows mainland carriers to fly just one flight a week on one route to any country and foreign airlines to operate just one flight a week to China.

  • ICC allows former I.Coast president Gbagbo to leave Belgium
    AFP

    ICC allows former I.Coast president Gbagbo to leave Belgium

    The International Criminal Court on Thursday said former Ivory Coast President Laurent Gbagbo can leave Belgium under certain conditions following his acquittal last year over post-electoral violence that killed 3,000 people. Gbagbo and his deputy Charles Ble Goude were both cleared of crimes against humanity a year ago, eight years after the former West African strongman's arrest and transfer to the Hague-based court. Belgium agreed to host Gbagbo, 73, after he was released in February last year under strict conditions including that he would return to court for a prosecution appeal against his acquittal.

  • Police officers around the country sound off on Minneapolis policing that led to George Floyd death
    Yahoo News Video

    Police officers around the country sound off on Minneapolis policing that led to George Floyd death

    Law enforcement officials around the country are publicly condemning the killing of George Floyd, an unarmed black man who was seen on video gasping for breath as a white officer held him down with a knee on his neck for close to eight minutes.

  • Merkel won't attend G7 summit in person if US goes ahead
    Associated Press

    Merkel won't attend G7 summit in person if US goes ahead

    Chancellor Angela Merkel will not personally attend a meeting in the U.S. with the leaders of the world's major economies if President Donald Trump goes ahead with it, unless the course of the coronavirus spread changes by then, her office said Saturday. After canceling the Group of Seven summit, originally scheduled for June 10-12 at Camp David, Trump said a week ago that he was again considering hosting an in-person meeting of world leaders because it would be a “great sign to all” of things returning to normal during the pandemic.

  • Defense secretary says coronavirus vaccine will be available within months, but experts skeptical
    Yahoo News

    Defense secretary says coronavirus vaccine will be available within months, but experts skeptical

    Pentagon leaders expressed strong confidence Thursday that a coronavirus vaccine will be available by January, and perhaps as early as this fall — claims that were met with skepticism by scientific experts. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said that he and Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar “will be co-chairing Operation Warp Speed,” the effort by the administration of President Trump to produce 300 million vaccine doses by January. “I'm confident that we will be able to deliver a vaccine at scale in time” by partnering with other government agencies and the private sector, Esper said.

  • ‘If you can say you can’t breathe, you’re breathing’: Mississippi mayor faces backlash over George Floyd comments
    The Independent

    ‘If you can say you can’t breathe, you’re breathing’: Mississippi mayor faces backlash over George Floyd comments

    A mayor in Mississippi is facing fierce backlash and calls to resign after saying that he “didn't see anything unreasonable” about the death of George Floyd. Mr Floyd, who was black, died while in police custody in Minneapolis after a white officer was filmed pinned him to the ground by his neck for a prolonged period of time. In the footage, Floyd can be heard saying “I can't breathe” to officers multiple times.

  • Why the officers fired for the George Floyd killing could ultimately get their jobs back
    The Guardian

    Why the officers fired for the George Floyd killing could ultimately get their jobs back

    The four Minneapolis officers involved in the killing of George Floyd were swiftly fired after footage of his death went viral. Officers in the US are frequently rehired after their termination for misconduct, a problem that experts say increases the likelihood of abuse and killings by police. Despite the decision on Tuesday to fire the policeman who knelt on Floyd's neck for nine minutes, along with three other officers at the scene, it's uncertain if the officers will face long-term repercussions.

  • Coronavirus quietly started spreading as early as January, CDC says
    NBC News

    Coronavirus quietly started spreading as early as January, CDC says

    The coronavirus began quietly spreading in the U.S. as early as late January, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday — before President Donald Trump blocked air travel from China and a full month before community spread was first detected in the country. It was also the first media briefing from the CDC in more than two months. "As America begins to reopen, looking back at how COVID-19 made its way to the United States will contribute to a better understanding to prepare for the future," Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the CDC, said Friday during a call with reporters.

  • The End of Hong Kong?
    National Review

    The End of Hong Kong?

    The 1997 handover of Hong Kong from Britain to the People's Republic of China marked the end of Western colonial rule in the region. Optimistic Western policy hands hoped that the final mending of the “unequal treaties,” as they were called by the Chinese Communist Party, would initiate Beijing's integration into the rules-based world order. Recent events in Hong Kong put paid to this hope.

  • Revealed: the worrying links between Huawei, our universities and China
    The Telegraph

    Revealed: the worrying links between Huawei, our universities and China

    With its cast iron replica of Budapest's Liberty Bridge and its pale-stoned version of Versailles, visitors to Huawei's research centre in Dongguan could be forgiven for thinking they were in Europe. The Telegraph can disclose today that the controversial Chinese telecoms giant backed 17 scientific papers with UK universities, about cutting-edge “dual use” technologies – which can have civilian applications but can also be used in military technology. At least 15 of the papers focused on technology that experts claim could be used to communicate with swarms of drones or on highly advanced image recognition software that experts claim could be used for extreme levels of surveillance.

  • Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vessels
    AFP

    Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vessels

    Iran's Revolutionary Guards on Thursday warned the United States against its naval presence in the Gulf as they received 110 new combat vessels. The vessels included Ashura-class speedboats, Zolfaghar coastal patrol boats and Taregh submarines, state television reported. "We announce today that wherever the Americans are, we are right next to them, and they will feel our presence even more in the near future," the Guards' navy chief Rear Admiral Alireza Tangsiri said during a ceremony in southern Iran.

  • Amy Cooper: Woman sacked after calling police on black man
    BBC

    Amy Cooper: Woman sacked after calling police on black man

    A white woman who called the police after a black man asked her to put her dog on a leash in New York City's Central Park has been fired from her job with an investment firm. Franklin Templeton announced on Twitter on Tuesday it had sacked an employee, "effective immediately". "We do not tolerate racism of any kind at Franklin Templeton," the tweet said.

  • Navy SEAL who oversaw the Osama bin Laden raid says 'Batman and Superman are not coming' in a speech advising college graduates to become their own heroes
    Business Insider

    Navy SEAL who oversaw the Osama bin Laden raid says 'Batman and Superman are not coming' in a speech advising college graduates to become their own heroes

    Retired US Navy Adm. William McRaven, the commander who oversaw the military raid that killed al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, called on recent college graduates to "save the world." In a speech to the graduates of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, he said he initially prepared a speech that included "cute little anecdotes." "But somehow that speech just didn't seem right in light of all that has happened in the past five months," McRaven said during an online commencement address.

  • Fox News Anchor Confronts Kayleigh McEnany on Her Mail-In Voting Hypocrisy
    The Daily Beast

    Fox News Anchor Confronts Kayleigh McEnany on Her Mail-In Voting Hypocrisy

    White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany may have found herself in an uncomfortable position on Thursday when Fox News anchor Ed Henry briefly pressed her on her lengthy history of voting by mail. Over the past several weeks, President Donald Trump has railed against mail-in ballots as more states consider expanding the process amid the coronavirus pandemic, falsely claiming that vote-by-mail is rife with fraud and abuse. During a typically friendly interview with McEnany on Fox News' America's Newsroom, co-anchor Ed Henry brought up the press secretary's own reliance on Florida's mail-in voting system, something she has utilized 11 times in the past decade.

  • Sen. Johnson seeks power to subpoena Obama-era officials in Russia probe investigation
    FOX News Videos

    Sen. Johnson seeks power to subpoena Obama-era officials in Russia probe investigation

    Wisconsin Sen. Ron Johnson, chairman of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, joins 'America's Newsroom.

  • Minneapolis police officer who knelt on George Floyd’s neck had 18 previous internal complaints against him
    The Independent

    Minneapolis police officer who knelt on George Floyd’s neck had 18 previous internal complaints against him

    The Minneapolis police officer who was filmed kneeling on George Floyd's neck for several minutes even as he said “I can't breathe” has previously been the subject of multiple complaints filed to the Minneapolis Police Department's Internal Affairs Division, it has emerged. Mr Chauvin, who has been fired along with the other three police officers who apprehended Mr Floyd, was reported to the division 18 times. According to a police summary, only two of the complaints were “closed with discipline”.

  • Mexican president hits the road again under pall of coronavirus deaths
    Reuters

    Mexican president hits the road again under pall of coronavirus deaths

    President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador said on Thursday he would restart his tours of Mexico, gambling on his ability to control the narrative that the country is bouncing back from the coronavirus outbreak even as death tolls and infections hit record highs. Five out of every six official coronavirus deaths in Mexico have occurred since Lopez Obrador declared the country had "tamed" the pandemic just over a month ago. "I've taken the decision to go because we need to restart our public life and move toward the new normality, with all the precautions," he told a regular news briefing, apparently opting to forgo a review of the situation he had suggested was due later on Thursday.

  • Officials cite mistakes as CDC removes coronavirus guidance
    Associated Press

    Officials cite mistakes as CDC removes coronavirus guidance

    U.S. health officials removed some coronavirus reopening tips for religious organizations only hours after posting them late last week, deleting guidance that discouraged choir gatherings and the use of shared communion cups. A federal health official on Friday said the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention posted a version of the guidance on May 22 that had not been cleared by White House officials. The initial guidance posted last week contained most of the same advice that was in a draft drawn up by the CDC more than a month ago and then shelved for weeks by administration officials.

  • Denmark and Norway cut coronavirus-hit Sweden out of free travel deal
    The Telegraph

    Denmark and Norway cut coronavirus-hit Sweden out of free travel deal

    The governments of Denmark and Norway have cut Sweden out of a deal allowing each other's tourists to travel freely between the two countries — citing their Nordic neighbour's higher levels of coronavirus infection. The deal, announced at parallel press conferences in Oslo and Copenhagen on Friday afternoon, showed Sweden has failed in its diplomatic efforts to be included in the first stage of a Nordic travel bubble. Under the deal, people from Denmark will from June 15 be allowed to enter Norway without needing to quarantine, while tourists from Norway will be able to enter Denmark, so long as they have booked accommodation for at least six days.