Clovis West student holds weekly harp concert for neighbors

In this time of sheltering at home, a Clovis West student is sharing a personal gift with neighbors.

  • Defense secretary says coronavirus vaccine will be available within months, but experts skeptical
    Yahoo News

    Defense secretary says coronavirus vaccine will be available within months, but experts skeptical

    Pentagon leaders expressed strong confidence Thursday that a coronavirus vaccine will be available by January, and perhaps as early as this fall — claims that were met with skepticism by scientific experts. Defense Secretary Mark Esper said that he and Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar “will be co-chairing Operation Warp Speed,” the effort by the administration of President Trump to produce 300 million vaccine doses by January. “I'm confident that we will be able to deliver a vaccine at scale in time” by partnering with other government agencies and the private sector, Esper said.

  • White House encourages hydroxychloroquine use for coronavirus again
    Yahoo News

    White House encourages hydroxychloroquine use for coronavirus again

    The White House continued on Thursday to promote the use of hydroxychloroquine, the antimalarial drug that President Trump and some of his supporters have held out as a treatment for the coronavirus, against the advice of the Food and Drug Administration and in the face of studies that have shown it can be harmful in some cases. Routinely touted by prominent conservative allies of the president, including primetime Fox News anchor Laura Ingraham, it has been denounced by members of the medical establishment as an unproven therapy that poses the risk of potentially fatal heart complications. The FDA recommends that COVID-19 patients, if they choose to use it, do so only in a hospital or under medical supervision in a clinical trial.

  • Long Island serial killer victim IDed 2 decades later
    Associated Press

    Long Island serial killer victim IDed 2 decades later

    A woman whose skeletal remains were found along a suburban New York beach highway, in an area where body parts of 10 other people had been strewn, was identified as a Philadelphia escort who went missing two decades ago, police said Thursday. Suffolk County police said the woman previously known as “Jane Doe No. 6” was identified through genetic genealogy technology as Valerie Mack, who also went by Melissa Taylor and was last seen in 2000 near Atlantic City, New Jersey. Determining the victim's identity has brought clarity to a long-running Long Island mystery that attracted national headlines, was featured on true-crime TV shows and was the subject of a recent Netflix film, Police Commissioner Geraldine Hart said.

  • Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vessels
    AFP

    Iran Guards warn US after receiving new combat vessels

    Iran's Revolutionary Guards on Thursday warned the United States against its naval presence in the Gulf as they received 110 new combat vessels. The vessels included Ashura-class speedboats, Zolfaghar coastal patrol boats and Taregh submarines, state television reported. "We announce today that wherever the Americans are, we are right next to them, and they will feel our presence even more in the near future," the Guards' navy chief Rear Admiral Alireza Tangsiri said during a ceremony in southern Iran.

  • Gov. Cuomo admits he wouldn't send his mother to a nursing home amid coronavirus crisis
    FOX News Videos

    Gov. Cuomo admits he wouldn't send his mother to a nursing home amid coronavirus crisis

    Gov. Andrew Cuomo faces backlash for nursing home deaths; reaction and analysis on 'The Five.

  • Why the officers fired for the George Floyd killing could ultimately get their jobs back
    The Guardian

    Why the officers fired for the George Floyd killing could ultimately get their jobs back

    The four Minneapolis officers involved in the killing of George Floyd were swiftly fired after footage of his death went viral. Officers in the US are frequently rehired after their termination for misconduct, a problem that experts say increases the likelihood of abuse and killings by police. Despite the decision on Tuesday to fire the policeman who knelt on Floyd's neck for nine minutes, along with three other officers at the scene, it's uncertain if the officers will face long-term repercussions.

  • Coronavirus quietly started spreading as early as January, CDC says
    NBC News

    Coronavirus quietly started spreading as early as January, CDC says

    The coronavirus began quietly spreading in the U.S. as early as late January, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Friday — before President Donald Trump blocked air travel from China and a full month before community spread was first detected in the country. It was also the first media briefing from the CDC in more than two months. "As America begins to reopen, looking back at how COVID-19 made its way to the United States will contribute to a better understanding to prepare for the future," Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the CDC, said Friday during a call with reporters.

  • China plans to extend curbs on international flights until June 30: U.S. embassy
    Reuters

    China plans to extend curbs on international flights until June 30: U.S. embassy

    Chinese civil aviation authorities plan to extend until June 30 their curbs on international flights to contain the spread of the coronavirus, the U.S. embassy in Beijing said in a travel advisory on Friday. China has drastically cut such flights since March to allay concerns over infections brought by arriving passengers. A so-called "Five One" policy allows mainland carriers to fly just one flight a week on one route to any country and foreign airlines to operate just one flight a week to China.

  • Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? 
    Yahoo News

    Can you contract coronavirus from a surface or object? 

    While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says contaminated surfaces are not the main way the virus is transmitted, the agency hasn't ruled surfaces out as a possible mode of infection. “If you want a reliable way to prevent yourself from getting the coronavirus, worry less about the surfaces you touch, and worry more about how frequently you wash your hands,” says Dr. Dara Kass, a Yahoo News Medical Contributor and associate professor of emergency medicine at Columbia University Medical Center. Confusion over how the virus is transmitted was reignited last week when the CDC edited the “How COVID-19 Spreads” page on their COVID-19 website to mention contaminated surfaces and objects under a new heading entitled, “The virus does not spread easily in other ways.”

  • Republican lawmakers accused of hiding positive COVID-19 test result from Democrats, who call it 'immoral'
    Yahoo News

    Republican lawmakers accused of hiding positive COVID-19 test result from Democrats, who call it 'immoral'

    Democratic lawmakers in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives are demanding answers after learning that one of their Republican colleagues tested positive for COVID-19, shared that information with GOP leadership, but never informed them. On May 20, Republican Rep. Andrew Lewis learned he had tested positive for COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Two other Republican House members who came in contact with Lewis were told to self-quarantine for 14 days, but Democratic lawmakers, some of whom also had contact with Lewis or with the two other Republicans before May 20, say they first learned of the positive test result on Wednesday.

  • Twitter flags Trump tweet on Minneapolis protests for 'glorifying violence'
    Yahoo News

    Twitter flags Trump tweet on Minneapolis protests for 'glorifying violence'

    For the second time, Twitter flagged a message from President Trump with a warning, saying that his post-midnight tweet calling for the military to shoot protesters in Minneapolis was “glorifying violence. As protests over the death of George Floyd escalated to the burning of a police station Thursday, Trump took to Twitter after midnight to write, “I can't stand back & watch this happen to a great American City, Minneapolis. A total lack of leadership.

  • One chart shows a noticeable correlation between how late a country started its coronavirus lockdown and the number of excess deaths
    Business Insider

    One chart shows a noticeable correlation between how late a country started its coronavirus lockdown and the number of excess deaths

    Reuters A Financial Times analysis of the excess death rates of 13 countries compared to when they imposed a lockdown has shown a close correlation between the two factors. The data suggests that the less widespread the virus was when a country locked down, the lower the excess death rates. For example, the UK waited until later in the severity of its outbreak before locking down, and now shows a high excess death rate.

  • Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UN
    The Telegraph

    Five UK mercenaries offered $150,000 each to fly helicopters for Gen Haftar in Libya, say UN

    Five British mercenaries involved in an operation to fly assault helicopters for Libya's renegade General Khalifa Haftar were offered bounties of up to $150,000 each for their role in the daring plot which went awry. The men, comprised of former Royal Marines and RAF personnel, were among 20 foreign mercenaries who traveled to Libya last June in an operation to pilot assault helicopters and speed boats to intercept Turkish ships ferrying weapons to Haftar's opponents – the UN-backed government in Tripoli. The Telegraph can reveal that the UN investigation concluded that the operation was led by Steven Lodge, a former South African Air Force officer who also served in the British military.

  • The U.S. Might Revoke Hong Kong's 'Special Status.' Here's What That Means For Business in the Global Financial Hub
    Time

    The U.S. Might Revoke Hong Kong's 'Special Status.' Here's What That Means For Business in the Global Financial Hub

    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo announced on Wednesday that Hong Kong was no longer sufficiently autonomous from mainland China — an assessment that could threaten the city's trading relationship with the U.S. and deal a blow to both American and Chinese companies operating there. The news comes following Beijing's decision late last week to draw up a national security law for Hong Kong. The move came after Hong Kong's Legislative Council failed in its obligations to enact such a law since the former British colony was handed back to China in 1997.

  • 'If you say you can't breathe, you're breathing': A Mississippi mayor who defended the officer who stood on George Floyd's neck has been asked to resign
    INSIDER

    'If you say you can't breathe, you're breathing': A Mississippi mayor who defended the officer who stood on George Floyd's neck has been asked to resign

    Hal Marx, the mayor of Petal, Mississippi, tweeted that George Floyd wasn't choking when a Minneapolis police officer stood on his neck because he could still speak. Seth Stoughton, co-author of "Evaluating Police Uses of Force," told Insider the position Floyd was placed in easily could have led to his death. A mayor in Mississippi is defending the officers involved in the arrest of George Floyd, who died while being subdued by police in Minneapolis.

  • IKEA manager in Poland charged for firing worker over anti-gay comments
    NBC News

    IKEA manager in Poland charged for firing worker over anti-gay comments

    A Polish prosecutor has charged an IKEA manager with religious discrimination for firing an employee who called homosexuality "an abomination" on the company's internal website. The employee at IKEA's Krakow store was fired last year after quoting passages from the Bible referring to homosexuality on the company's intranet and refusing to remove his comments, a spokesman for the Warsaw prosecutor's office said. "As an employer, we will provide all the help and support to our charged employee," said a spokeswoman from Ingka Group, which owns most IKEA stores including those in Poland.

  • Move over James Bond; India returns alleged bird spy to Pakistan
    Reuters

    Move over James Bond; India returns alleged bird spy to Pakistan

    Indian police have released a pigeon belonging to a Pakistani fisherman after a probe found that the bird, which had flown across the contentious border between the nuclear-armed nations, was not a spy, two officials said on Friday. "The pigeon was set free yesterday (May 28) after nothing suspicious was found," said Shailendra Mishra, a senior police official in Indian-administered Kashmir. The Pakistani owner of the pigeon had urged India to return his bird, which Indian villagers turned over to police after discovering it.

  • Failed Maduro coup leader flew on pro-govt magnate's plane
    Associated Press

    Failed Maduro coup leader flew on pro-govt magnate's plane

    It was mid-January and Jordan Goudreau was itching to get going on a secret plan to raid Venezuela and arrest President Nicolás Maduro when the former special forces commando flew to the city of Barranquilla in Colombia to meet with his would-be partner in arms. To get there, Goudreau and two former Green Beret buddies relied on some unusual help: a chartered flight out of Miami's Opa Locka executive airport on a plane owned by a Venezuelan businessman so close to the government of Hugo Chávez that he spent almost 4 years in a U.S. prison for trying to cover up clandestine cash payments to its allies. The owner of the Venezuela-registered Cessna Citation II with yellow and blue lines, identified with the tail number YV-3231, was Franklin Durán, according to three people familiar with the businessman's movements who spoke on the condition of anonymity for fear of retaliation.

  • Burundi first lady hospitalised in Nairobi: government sources
    AFP

    Burundi first lady hospitalised in Nairobi: government sources

    Burundi's first lady was in hospital in Nairobi on Friday, after being flown in on a late-night medical flight, according to sources at the airport and in the presidency. First lady Denise Bucumi was flown out of Burundi on a Pilatus plane by the AMREF air ambulance service, according to a source at the Melchior Airport in Bujumbura. A high-ranking government official, speaking on condition of anonymity, told AFP that Bucumi had gone to Nairobi "for treatment as she caught the coronavirus".

  • Flynn Asked Russian for Alliance Against ‘Radical Islamists’ on Infamous Phone Call
    The Daily Beast

    Flynn Asked Russian for Alliance Against ‘Radical Islamists’ on Infamous Phone Call

    Flynn would later plead guilty – and, later still, seek to reverse his plea – for lying to the FBI in January 2017 about the discussions of U.S. sanctions on Russia that he had with Kislyak on that day and others. But the calls, declassified by former acting Director of National Intelligence Richard Grenell and released under the auspices of confirmed successor John Ratcliffe, confirm an overlooked aspect of the Trump team's early outreach to Moscow. The reason why Flynn was keen for Moscow to tamp down its response to the Obama administration's final round of sanctions was to advance a longstanding desire on Flynn's behalf to unite the two nations against a dark vision of Islam that Flynn h...

  • George Floyd death: Ex-officer charged with murder in Minneapolis
    BBC

    George Floyd death: Ex-officer charged with murder in Minneapolis

    A former Minneapolis police officer has been arrested and charged with murder following the death of an unarmed black man in custody. Derek Chauvin, who is white, was shown in footage kneeling on 46-year-old George Floyd's neck on Monday. Hennepin County Prosecutor Mike Freeman said Mr Chauvin was charged with third-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter.

  • Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina Ashrafi
    The Telegraph

    Iran outraged by 'honour killing' of 14-year-old girl Romina Ashrafi

    The killing of an Iranian teen by her father after she eloped with an older man sparked outrage on Wednesday, with local media denouncing "institutionalised violence" in "patriarchal" Iran. Iranian media covered the apparent "honour" crime extensively, with Ebtekar newspaper leading its front page with the headline "Unsafe father's house". According to local media, Romina Ashrafi was killed in her sleep on May 21 by her father, who decapitated her in the family home in Talesh in northern Gilan province.

  • Will Trump dispute the 2020 election results? His tweets this week suggest so
    The Guardian

    Will Trump dispute the 2020 election results? His tweets this week suggest so

    Unhinged as it may be for the president to accuse, without a scintilla of evidence, a morning television host of murder, that particular conspiracy theory was not the most disturbing accusation to issue from Trump's Twitter feed this week. There is NO WAY (ZERO!) that Mail-In Ballots will be anything less than substantially fraudulent. Mail boxes will be robbed, ballots will be forged & even illegally printed out & fraudulently signed … This will be a Rigged Election.

  • New Zealand has no new coronavirus cases and just discharged its last hospital patient. Here are the secrets to the country's success.
    Business Insider

    New Zealand has no new coronavirus cases and just discharged its last hospital patient. Here are the secrets to the country's success.

    REUTERS/Henning Gloystein New Zealand has reported zero new coronavirus cases over the last five days, and just discharged its last hospital patient. The country naturally had things going for it — like being a sparsely populated collection of islands with obedient citizens — but also implemented key public health measures to control the spread. The country issued lockdowns early, implemented widespread testing and contact tracing.

  • Wisconsin reports record number of new coronavirus cases, deaths
    NBC News

    Wisconsin reports record number of new coronavirus cases, deaths

    Wisconsin saw a record number of new coronavirus cases and deaths reported in a single day on Wednesday, two weeks after the state's Supreme Court struck down its statewide stay-at-home order. The state reported 599 new known COVID-19 cases on Wednesday with 22 known deaths, according to Wisconsin's Department of Health Services, the highest recorded daily rise since the pandemic began there. As of Wednesday, the state had more than 16,460 known cases and 539 known deaths, according to the department.