Colin Kaepernick is on Chargers' workout list

Just two days after NFL commissioner Roger Goodell publicly encouraged teams to sign former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, one team has taken a small step in that direction.

  • Oklahoma becomes latest red state to approve Obamacare's Medicaid expansion at the ballot box
    Yahoo News

    Oklahoma becomes latest red state to approve Obamacare's Medicaid expansion at the ballot box

    Voters in Oklahoma narrowly approved an expansion of Medicaid on Tuesday night, making it the latest conservative-leaning state to approve of the Obamacare provision at the ballot box. The measure bypasses the Republican-controlled Legislature and governor's mansion to enshrine insurance coverage for low-income Oklahomans via the Affordable Care Act (ACA, or Obamacare) in the state's constitution. “In the middle of a pandemic, Oklahomans stepped up and delivered lifesaving care for nearly 200,000 of our neighbors, took action to keep our rural hospitals open, and brought our tax dollars home to protect jobs and boost our local economy,” Yes on 802 campaign manager Amber England said in a statement after the victory.

  • After a Black protester is killed in Omaha, witnesses claim a rushed investigation ignored signs of the shooter's allegedly racist past
    Yahoo News

    After a Black protester is killed in Omaha, witnesses claim a rushed investigation ignored signs of the shooter's allegedly racist past

    More than 300 people have been arrested in Omaha since Friday, May 29, when the city of less than 500,000 was swept up in the tidal wave of protests against police brutality and systemic racism that had erupted in Minneapolis after the brutal killing by police of an unarmed Black man named George Floyd. Jake Gardner, the white bar owner who shot and killed James Scurlock, a 22-year-old Black protester, on the second night of unrest in Omaha — Saturday, May 30 — wasn't one of them. Within just 36 hours of the shooting, Douglas County prosecutor Don Kleine announced that criminal charges would not be filed, finding that Gardner — a 38-year-old ex-Marine with an expired concealed carry permit — had shot Scurlock in self-defense.

  • Harvard Grad Says She Was Fired from Deloitte Job for Threatening ‘All Lives Matter’ Supporters
    National Review

    Harvard Grad Says She Was Fired from Deloitte Job for Threatening ‘All Lives Matter’ Supporters

    A recent Harvard graduate who threatened to “stab” anyone who told her “all lives matter” has been fired from her job, she announced in a tearful video. Claira Janover, who said in a viral but since-deleted TikTok post that she would “stab” those with “the nerve” to say “all lives matter,” posted several tearful videos explaining that her new employer, Deloitte, had fired her. “I know this is what Trump supporters wanted because standing up for Black Lives Matter put me in a place online to be seen by millions of people,” Janover explained.

  • Democratic senator blocks 1,123 military promotions over impeachment witness
    CBS News

    Democratic senator blocks 1,123 military promotions over impeachment witness

    Democratic Senator Tammy Duckworth, a combat veteran from Illinois, announced Thursday she plans to block more than 1,100 military promotions until she receives confirmation from Defense Secretary Mark Esper that he will not block an expected promotion for the Army officer who was a key witness in President Trump's impeachment proceedings. Duckworth said she is seeking written confirmation from Esper that "he did not, or will not, block the expected and deserved promotion" of Lieutenant Colonel Alexander Vindman, who testified before House investigators during their impeachment inquiry into Mr. Trump's dealings with Ukraine, to full colonel.

  • Martin Gugino, the Buffalo protester pushed to the ground and injured by police, released after nearly a month in hospital
    USA TODAY

    Martin Gugino, the Buffalo protester pushed to the ground and injured by police, released after nearly a month in hospital

    The 75-year-old man who fell to the ground after being pushed by Buffalo police officers in June was released Tuesday from a local hospital. Martin Gugino sustained a brain injury and a fractured skull related to the June 4 incident that prompted a national outcry, leading to the arrest of two officers on charges of assault and intentionally pushing him. His lawyer, Kelly Zarcone, said Gugino was released from Erie County Medical Center and is "recovering at an undisclosed location in order to ensure his privacy."

  • Italian police seize record amount of amphetamines shipped from Syria
    Reuters

    Italian police seize record amount of amphetamines shipped from Syria

    Italian police said on Wednesday they had seized about 14 tonnes of amphetamine pills worth around 1 billion euros ($1 billion) arriving from Syria, in what they described as the world's single largest operation of its kind. Used in the 1960s to treat narcolepsy and depression, Captagon is one of several brand names for fenethylline hydrochloride, a drug compound belonging to a family of amphetamines that can inhibit fear and ward off tiredness. Captagon is popular in the Middle East, and widespread in war-torn areas such as Syria, where conflict has fuelled demand and created opportunities for producers.

  • See the yellow card Alaska Airlines will give to passengers who refuse to wear masks on its flights
    Business Insider

    See the yellow card Alaska Airlines will give to passengers who refuse to wear masks on its flights

    Bruce Bennett/Getty Alaska Airlines is enforcing the mandatory face covering policy onboard its aircraft by issuing written warnings in the form of yellow cards, like the ones in a soccer match. "The safety of guests and employees is always our top priority, but we also need your cooperation to help keep each other safe," the card says. "This is why Alaska Airlines requires guests to wear a face mask or covering while on board, except when eating or drinking."

  • US tries to seize Iranian gas heading toward Venezuela
    Associated Press

    US tries to seize Iranian gas heading toward Venezuela

    U.S. federal prosecutors are seeking to seize four tankers sailing toward Venezuela with gasoline supplied by Iran, the latest attempt to disrupt ever-closer trade ties between the two heavily sanctioned anti-American allies. The civil-forfeiture complaint filed late Wednesday in the District of Columbia federal court alleges that the sale was arranged by a businessman, Mahmoud Madanipour, with ties to Iran's Revolutionary Guard Corps, a U.S.-designated foreign terrorist organization. “The profits from these activities support the IRGC's full range of nefarious activities, including the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery, support for terrorism, and a variety of human rights abuses, at home and abroad,” prosecutor Zia Faruqui alleges in the complaint.

  • 'We're not going anywhere': Seattle's Chop zone dismantled but cause lives on
    The Guardian

    'We're not going anywhere': Seattle's Chop zone dismantled but cause lives on

    The occupied protest zone near downtown Seattle known as the Capitol Hill Organized Protest, or “Chop”, effectively came to a swift end early on Wednesday morning when officers largely cleared the area of people and encampments, despite some protests lingering overnight into Thursday. “We had a space called the conversation cafe where people could come to learn about racism and to talk about it in ways they don't get to do in their daily lives.”

  • Arizona tells Pence it needs additional 500 health care workers as COVID-19 cases soar
    Yahoo News

    Arizona tells Pence it needs additional 500 health care workers as COVID-19 cases soar

    Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey told Vice President Mike Pence on Wednesday that the state needed an additional 500 health care workers as the number of cases of COVID-19 continues to set records there. We did hear in the briefing today of the need for personnel,” Pence said at a news conference following his meeting with Ducey. We've already responded with 62 medical personnel arrived this week in Tucson, but the governor conveyed to us an additional request of another 500 personnel and I've instructed the acting secretary of homeland security to move out immediately on providing the additional nurses and doctors and technical personnel.

  • The Best Bike Lights to Illuminate Your Ride
    Popular Mechanics

    The Best Bike Lights to Illuminate Your Ride

    See what's coming and stay visible with these 11 bicycle lights. From Popular Mechanics

  • Terrifying: Why France Once Pointed Its Nuclear Weapons at Germany
    The National Interest

    Terrifying: Why France Once Pointed Its Nuclear Weapons at Germany

    Key Point: During the Cold War, France had Germany zeroed in with tactical nuclear missiles—in case of a Soviet invasion. Today, France has the third-largest nuclear arsenal in the world, behind the United States and Russia. Unlike the American or Russian nuclear triad, which is made up of air- land- and sea-based nuclear weapons, France maintains a nuclear dyad of air- and sea-based nuclear missiles.

  • GOP candidates who embrace far-right QAnon conspiracy theory score primary wins
    Yahoo News

    GOP candidates who embrace far-right QAnon conspiracy theory score primary wins

    A candidate who has expressed enthusiasm for QAnon knocked off a Trump-endorsed Republican incumbent in Colorado's House primary Tuesday night, becoming the latest in a string of victorious GOP candidates who have embraced the conspiracy theory. Bar owner and gun rights activist Lauren Boebert, 33, defeated five-time incumbent Rep. Scott Tipton in Colorado's Third Congressional District, which encompasses the mostly rural western half of the state. Boebert ran to Tipton's right, saying he wasn't supportive enough of President Trump.

  • College students going to 'COVID parties' to see who gets sick first, Alabama officials say
    USA TODAY

    College students going to 'COVID parties' to see who gets sick first, Alabama officials say

    Tuscaloosa Fire Rescue Chief Randy Smith said Tuesday that city officials were able to confirm incidents of students knowingly diagnosed with COVID-19 still choosing to attend parties and gatherings within the city and county. We thought that was kind of a rumor at first,” said Smith, who is heading the city of Tuscaloosa's Incident Command team in response to the coronavirus. We did some additional research.

  • Ex-Canada PM Mulroney calls for revised relations with China
    AFP

    Ex-Canada PM Mulroney calls for revised relations with China

    Canada must have an "urgent rethink" of its relationship with China, former prime minister Brian Mulroney said Wednesday as tensions build over the possible extradition to the United States of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou. Conservative Mulroney backed his Liberal successor Justin Trudeau's rejection of any exchange of Meng, who was arrested in Vancouver in December 2018, for two Canadians who were detained in China in apparent retaliation. Mulroney said Canada's hope that China would emerge as a constructive partner in international relations had been proven wrong, referring in particular to Beijing's militarization of the South China Sea.

  • The E.U. never even considered letting in U.S. travelers. That's how bad America's outbreak is.
    NBC News

    The E.U. never even considered letting in U.S. travelers. That's how bad America's outbreak is.

    People in Algeria, Rwanda, Uruguay, China and Canada are now free to travel to parts of Europe on vacation. Travelers from the United States are not. At first glance, it seems like the European Union has chosen a motley crew of 15 countries whose residents are now officially allowed nonessential travel into its member nations, something that has been restricted since the middle of March.

  • With 'Partial Human Remains' Found in Texas, Family of Missing Soldier Vanessa Guillen Say They Believe She Is Dead
    Time

    With 'Partial Human Remains' Found in Texas, Family of Missing Soldier Vanessa Guillen Say They Believe She Is Dead

    The family attorney of solider Vanessa Guillen, who went missing months ago after last being seen at Fort Hood Army Base in central Texas, said during a Wednesday press conference that they “believe that her remains were found.” “I feel empty,” Mayra Guillen, Vanessa Guillen's sister, tells TIME. The press conference came after a June 30 statement from Fort Hood officials, which confirmed that “agents have discovered what has been described as partial human remains after analysis from a forensic anthropologist.”

  • Sen. Scott on COVID-19 surge in Florida: We can beat this without the government taking away our rights
    FOX News Videos

    Sen. Scott on COVID-19 surge in Florida: We can beat this without the government taking away our rights

    Florida Republican Sen. Rick Scott says citizens can responsibly combat the virus by being given more information from the government instead of just being told what to do.

  • Judge Blocks Trump Admin. Rule on Third-Country Asylum Seekers
    National Review

    Judge Blocks Trump Admin. Rule on Third-Country Asylum Seekers

    A federal judge has overturned a Trump administration policy mandating that asylum seekers first apply for asylum in countries they pass through on their way to the U.S.-Mexico border. The policy was aimed at deterring illegal immigration from Central American countries including Honduras, Guatemala, and El Salvador. U.S. District Judge Timothy J. Kelly of Washington, D.C., a Trump appointee, said that the administration violated the Administrative Procedure Act when adopting the policy.

  • More than 400 US Army paratroopers flew almost 5,000 miles to practice a long-range Pacific island invasion
    Business Insider

    More than 400 US Army paratroopers flew almost 5,000 miles to practice a long-range Pacific island invasion

    US Army airborne troops flew nearly 5,000 miles to execute a mock invasion of Guam. U.S. Air Force photo by Master Sgt. Richard Ebensberger Over 400 paratroopers flew from Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson in Alaska to Andersen Air Force Base in Guam, where the soldiers jumped and practiced seizing an airfield, which would clear the way for follow-on forces in a real combat situation. US Army Alaska called it the exercise, which appears to be part of the Department of Defense's ongoing efforts to master modern expeditionary warfare tactics for possible combat in the Pacific theater, the "largest airborne operation here in recent memory."

  • Military Mystery: What Happened to Russia's New T-14 Tank in Syria?
    The National Interest

    Military Mystery: What Happened to Russia's New T-14 Tank in Syria?

    Here's What You Need To Remember: If the T-14 Armata was indeed taken out by insurgents – whether they simply "got lucky" or not – might not bode well for the advanced tank, especially given its costs. Last month multiple media reports suggested that the Russian military's new T-14 Armata tank had been "battle-tested" in Syria. Russia Beyond cited Russian Industry and Trade Minister Denis Manturov, who had reportedly said in a mid-April TV interview on Rossiya-1, "Yes, that's correct.

  • McConnell splits with Trump on defence bill veto and bases named for Confederate generals
    The Independent

    McConnell splits with Trump on defence bill veto and bases named for Confederate generals

    Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has split with Donald Trump over the president's threat to veto the annual defence spending bill if it includes a provision to rename military bases named for Confederate figureheads. Well, I would hope the president really wouldn't veto the bill over this issue. I hope the president will reconsider vetoing the entire defence bill, which includes pay raises for our troops, over a provision in there that could lead to changing the names,” Mr McConnell said in an interview on Fox News on Wednesday.

  • Column: Pete Buttigieg on running as a gay man and his struggles with Black voters
    LA Times

    Column: Pete Buttigieg on running as a gay man and his struggles with Black voters

    Pride 2020 is officially in the books and man, it was complicated: The COVID-19 pandemic forced organizers to cancel parades; the horrific deaths of Breonna Taylor, George Floyd and Ahmaud Arbery sparked a month-long Black Lives Matter protests, many joined by the LGBTQ community in a show of solidarity; marriage equality turned 5; and the Supreme Court ruled it was illegal to fire someone for their sexual orientation or gender identity. The former mayor of South Bend, Ind., joined the ranks of groundbreaking LGBTQ politicos such as Harvey Milk, Barbara Jordan and Barney Frank when he announced his candidacy for President in April 2019.

  • Terry Crews and the Toxic ‘Black Supremacy’ Myth
    The Daily Beast

    Terry Crews and the Toxic ‘Black Supremacy’ Myth

    Actor Terry Crews fears an imaginary future where reverse racism—to date, a fiction—reigns supreme. With these tweets, Crews seemed to be pointing to the increasing prevalence of pro-Black stances within Black communities, especially Black-activist circles and saying that they're too much—dangerous, even. Many popular Black pundits, actors, and commentators moved to call him in and out online, expressing outrage that a prominent Black figure like Crews is using his platform to espouse “all lives matter” talking points.

  • Memphis police clear downtown plaza, detain protesters who camped out for two weeks
    USA TODAY

    Memphis police clear downtown plaza, detain protesters who camped out for two weeks

    Memphis police showed up at Civic Center Plaza outside City Hall Wednesday morning around 6 a.m. local time to remove protesters who have been camped out for the past two weeks. The city said the move was necessary to allow for renovation of the building's roof and exterior, and after a standoff, about nine demonstrators were led away in handcuffs starting about 8:41 a.m. The demonstrators appeared not to resist the police officers as they were placed one-by-one into police vehicles, and the police appeared not to use hand strikes, tear gas, pepper spray, batons or similar use of force.