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The computer repairman with Hunter Biden's laptop lost his lawsuit against Twitter and has to pay the company's legal fees

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Hunter Biden
  • The computer repairman who had Hunter Biden's laptop lost his lawsuit against Twitter.

  • He alleged Twitter defamed him when it locked the NY Post's account for distributing info "obtained through hacking."

  • The district judge dismissed the case with prejudice, meaning Mac Isaac can't re-file it in court.

  • See more stories on Insider's business page.

The computer repairman famous for fixing Hunter Biden's laptop lost his lawsuit against Twitter on Monday.

District Judge Beth Bloom dismissed the case against the social media company with prejudice, meaning the case cannot be brought to court again. Bloom also ordered the plaintiff, John Paul Mac Isaac, to pay Twitter's attorney fees via Florida's anti-SLAPP statute.

Mac Isaac owned The Mac Shop in Delaware. Biden traveled to the store in 2019 and asked him to recover data from his damaged computers, but never returned to collect the information or pay his invoice.

Mac Isaac ultimately turned over the data to the FBI and then-President Donald Trump's lawyer, Rudy Giuliani, after Biden didn't pick up the hard drive of recovered information. Giuliani sent the information to the New York Post, which ran a story using the data while inadvertently including the name of Mac Isaac's business in a photo.

Twitter ultimately locked the company's account for sharing the article, noting that the NY Post distributed "content obtained through hacking that contains private information."

Twitter notification
Department of Justice

Read more: Republicans are itching to go after Hunter Biden if they win the majority in 2022

Mac Isaac alleged that he was threatened after his business was identified from the story, ultimately forcing him to close his shop and sue Twitter for damages. He said Twitter spread "the false belief that Plaintiff is a hacker" because the company warned about its hacked materials policy when referring to the NY Post article.

But the judge specifically noted that the platform itself never mentioned Mac Isaac or the name of his business in its several posts on the matter. The judge specifically said that news sites reported the business owner's name, never Twitter itself.

She also wrote that Twitter has a First Amendment right to "decide what to publish and what not to publish on its platform."

According to his LinkedIn page, Mac Isaac now owns a new data recovery business, Johnny Mac's, in Denver, Colorado.

Read the original article on Business Insider

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