Conflicting social media posts led to confusion over mass shooting hoax at Savannah High

Reports of a possible active shooter situation at Savannah High School have now been confirmed to be a hoax, but as initial news of a possible mass shooting at the Chatham County school unfolded Wednesday morning, students, parents and concerned locals took to social media to express their fears, confusion and alert others of the alarming situation.

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Here's what we know: Hoax confirmed at Savannah High School after reports of active shooter

Family members look at social media posts on their phone as they wait to pick up their students on Wednesday November 30, 2022 at Savannah High.
Family members look at social media posts on their phone as they wait to pick up their students on Wednesday November 30, 2022 at Savannah High.

Students, parents react to mass shooting hoax in Georgia on TikTok

Some students from surrounding Chatham County schools made TikTok videos as their schools were placed on a lockdown safety measure.

In a TikTok video, user @yuurrgf showed herself sitting at her desk with an overlay text of "crying right now because school isn't a fun or safe place for kids anymore."

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In her caption, she wrote that there was a shooting at Savannah High and Brunswick and that more than three people were found dead.

One parent, @amberlynne, made a TikTok video right after receiving a text from her daughter's school that it had been placed on lockdown due to a possible active shooter.

"Please check on your babies if they are at that school," she said.

Twitter user @taylor-ariannaa expressed how the person who called in the hoax had "traumatized a lot of us" and condemned the false information being spread.

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Before confirmed information became available, conspiracy theories started floating around with claims that a teacher shot six students and that the calls were a distraction to pull law enforcement to one area.

Other Instagram users posted videos on their Stories where alleged students inside of the school and those outside of the area had claimed to hear gunshots.

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Former Savannah resident Kia Brooks, manager and mother of Louisiana State University women's basketball player Flau’jae Johnson, worked to dispel those rumors herself by hopping on a facetime call with Tim Jordan, Savannah High School boys basketball coach and athletic director.

"I just spoke to Coach Jordan myself on Facetime," Brooks wrote in her caption. "He's there. No one is dead."

One common sentiment carried through multiple posts: this is happening too much.

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According to data compiled by the Gun Violence Archive, a non-profit that tracks gun violence incidents across the country, there have been 617 mass shootings in 2022.

On Thanksgiving week, six victims were shot and killed in a Virginia Walmart. That came just three days after five people were killed in a shooting rampage at an LGBTQ nightclub in Colorado and nine days after three University of Virginia football players were killed in a shooting.

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Laura Nwogu is the quality of life reporter for Savannah Morning News. Contact her at LNwogu@gannett.com. Twitter: @lauranwogu_

This article originally appeared on Savannah Morning News: School shooting hoax: Conflicting social media posts created confusion