Controlling blood pressure may help ward off dementia

More than 100 million Americans are being treated for high blood pressure. A new study finds keeping blood pressure in check could lower the risk of developing dementia. Dr. Tara Narula joins "CBS Evening News" to explain.

  • Republican who 'wanted to destroy' Bill Clinton during 1998 impeachment has regrets
    Yahoo News

    Republican who 'wanted to destroy' Bill Clinton during 1998 impeachment has regrets

    A former Republican congressman who led the charge to impeach Bill Clinton in 1998 said he paid a visit to the former Democratic president a few years ago to ask forgiveness for his role in the affair. “I hated Bill Clinton, wanted to destroy him, asked to be on Judiciary Committee so that I could impeach him,” said Bob Inglis, R-S.C., in an interview on “The Long Game,” a Yahoo News podcast. Inglis visited Clinton a few years ago at the former president's office in Harlem, he said, in what he described as a “very interesting” meeting.

  • Stanford law professor lights up House impeachment hearing
    Yahoo News

    Stanford law professor lights up House impeachment hearing

    Stanford law professor Pamela Karlan delivered powerful testimony Wednesday before the House Judiciary Committee, explaining in simple terms her view that President Trump's conduct warranted his impeachment. As she began her testimony, Karlan, who was called by Democrats to testify with Harvard law professor Noah Feldman and University of North Carolina law professor Michael Gerhardt, rebuked Republican ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, who asserted that those who had not reviewed the testimony of prior witnesses had no business testify about it.

  • Police chief firing puts spotlight on cops who let him go
    Associated Press

    Police chief firing puts spotlight on cops who let him go

    For officers, pulling over a fellow cop can be an awkward dilemma, one that's magnified when it's the head of one of the nation's largest police departments. It's a worst-nightmare situation for a police officer to encounter their superior or chief who has been drinking,” said Philip Stinson, a criminal justice professor at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. They're damned if they do, and they're damned if they don't in terms of how they respond or act.

  • Rep. Duncan Hunter Shows no Signs of Resigning Despite Pleading Guilty to Campaign Finance Charges
    National Review

    Rep. Duncan Hunter Shows no Signs of Resigning Despite Pleading Guilty to Campaign Finance Charges

    Representative Duncan Hunter (R., Calif.) has not indicated that he will leave his seat in the House after he pleaded guilty on Wednesday to campaign finance violations. Hunter and his wife, who pleaded guilty to similar charges in June, were accused of using $250,000 in campaign funds to pay for family vacations to Hawaii, plane tickets for their pet rabbit, and other personal expenses.

  • Tennessee executes blind death row inmate Lee Hall by electric chair for 1991 murder of girlfriend
    USA TODAY

    Tennessee executes blind death row inmate Lee Hall by electric chair for 1991 murder of girlfriend

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Tennessee executed death row inmate Lee Hall in the electric chair Thursday night, marking the fourth time the state has used the method since 2018. Hall, 53, was pronounced dead at 7:26 p.m. CST, according to the Tennessee Department of Correction. Media witnesses described what appeared to be a faint trail of white smoke rising from Hall's head as the lethal current coursed through his body.

  • Sumatran tiger kills farmer in Indonesia
    AFP

    Sumatran tiger kills farmer in Indonesia

    A Sumatran tiger has killed an Indonesian farmer, police said Friday, marking the second fatal attack by the critically endangered species in less than a month. The latest mauling near Pagaralam city in Sumatra prompted authorities to warn residents against going into local forests. The coffee farmer's body was found Thursday by relatives who grew worried when he failed to return home, according to authorities.

  • The U.S. Navy Will Need a New Stealth '6th-Generation' Fighter After the F-35
    The National Interest

    The U.S. Navy Will Need a New Stealth '6th-Generation' Fighter After the F-35

    The U.S. Navy will need a new “sixth-generation” warplane eventually to follow the F-35C stealth fighter that's just beginning to enter service. The Navy in February 2019 declared its first front-line F-35C squadron “ready for flight.” Strike-Fighter Squadron 147, based in California, in 2021 is slated to embark on the aircraft carrier USS Vinson for the type's first deployment. The fleet aims to integrate a 10-plane F-35C squadron into each of its nine carrier air wings, which embark on the 11 Ford- and Nimitz-class carriers.

  • Pearl Harbour shooting: two people killed after US sailor attacks base in Hawaii
    The Telegraph

    Pearl Harbour shooting: two people killed after US sailor attacks base in Hawaii

    Two people have been killed and one injured after a gunman opened fire before taking his own life at Pearl Harbour military base in Hawaii. The Pearl Harbour Naval Shipyard was locked down on Wednesday afternoon after the shooting which is believed to have started at 2.30pm local time (10.30pm GMT). The shooting took place at Dry Dock 2, near the south entrance of a combined US Air Force and Navy base about 8 miles (13 km) from Honolulu.

  • The college admissions scandal ringleader tried to recruit 7 Stanford coaches to be part of the scheme but only one took the bait
    INSIDER

    The college admissions scandal ringleader tried to recruit 7 Stanford coaches to be part of the scheme but only one took the bait

    Stanford President Marc Tessier-Lavigne said in a letter to the university community that the ringleader of the college admissions scandal, William "Rick" Singer, approached seven coaches at the school about trading bribes for students' recruitments to the school at athletes. Tessier-Lavigne said an external review of the case revealed that only the school's former sailing coach, John Vandemoer, accepted Singer's deal. Vandemoer accepted $610,000 in bribes from Singer to facilitate the admission of students as sailing recruits.

  • William Barr Is Making It Harder to Protect the 2020 Election
    Bloomberg

    William Barr Is Making It Harder to Protect the 2020 Election

    Since February, when he became attorney general for the second time in his long career, Barr's most notable priority has been undermining his own department's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election. Now news reports suggest that Barr contests the conclusion of a report by the Justice Department inspector general that the investigation was justified. In 2017, he stated that a bogus controversy involving Hillary Clinton and a Canadian mining company called Uranium One was more worthy of investigation than the staggering array of contacts between Trump's presidential campaign and Russia, and the equally staggering number of lies told to explain away those contacts.

  • Pelosi warns reporter: 'Don't mess with me' about 'hate' for Trump
    Yahoo News

    Pelosi warns reporter: 'Don't mess with me' about 'hate' for Trump

    While defending her call to pursue articles of impeachment against President Trump, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi clashed with a reporter who asked if she hates the president. As she was leaving her weekly press conference on Capitol Hill, the reporter, James Rosen of Sinclair television, asked, “Do you hate the president, Madame Speaker? Pelosi stopped, turned and pointed to him.

  • Hong Kong police sound alarm over homemade explosives
    Associated Press

    Hong Kong police sound alarm over homemade explosives

    Hong Kong's much-maligned police force provided a rare behind-the-scenes look Friday at its bomb disposal squad to show the potentially deadly destructive force of homemade explosives seized during months of protests that have shaken the semi-autonomous Chinese territory. In a demonstration for media cameras, the bomb squad set off a series of controlled explosions in a disused quarry overlooking the city's high-rise skyline, blowing up a watermelon and shredding the front of a minivan. In July, police announced the seizure of about 2 kilograms (4.4 pounds) of TATP, which has been used in militant attacks worldwide.

  • Transgender teen charged in fatal school shooting will be tried as an adult
    Reuters

    Transgender teen charged in fatal school shooting will be tried as an adult

    A transgender teenager who told police that he and a friend opened fire at a suburban Denver high school to exact revenge on classmates who bullied him should be tried on murder charges as an adult, a judge ruled on Wednesday. Alec McKinney, 16, was ordered along with Devon Erickson, 19, to stand trial on first-degree murder, attempted murder and weapons charges in the May 7 shooting rampage at the Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) School in Highlands Ranch, Colorado, in which one student was killed and eight others wounded. Kendrick Castillo, 18, was shot to death when he ran toward one of the two assailants in what has been called a heroic effort to stop the shooting and save lives.

  • Tesla refused to help the police with an investigation into stolen copper wire after Elon Musk learned about the incident because the company was scared of bad press
    Business Insider

    Tesla refused to help the police with an investigation into stolen copper wire after Elon Musk learned about the incident because the company was scared of bad press

    Tesla declined to help local authorities with an investigation into stolen copper wire at its factory in Sparks, Nevada, out of fear that it could make the electric-car maker look bad, the Reno Gazette Journal's Benjamin Spillman reported, citing a police report from June 2018. Tesla security employees reportedly told the Storey County Sheriff's Department that the contractor who first alerted authorities about the stolen copper wire was fired after making the report. Tesla declined to assist authorities on other occasions amid reports of "rampant crime" in 2018, according to the Reno Gazette Journal's report.

  • Blind man executed in US for killing ex-girlfriend
    AFP

    Blind man executed in US for killing ex-girlfriend

    A blind man was executed by the US state of Tennessee on Thursday for burning his ex-girlfriend to death. Lee Hall, who was previously known as Leroy Hall, chose to be executed by electrocution rather than lethal injection, a choice that Tennessee has offered to those condemned to death before 1999. He was pronounced dead at 7:26 pm local time (01:26 GMT), according to a statement from the Tennessee Department of Correction.

  • Psychiatrists: Trump’s mental state is deteriorating dangerously due to impeachment with potentially ‘catastrophic outcomes’
    Yahoo News Video

    Psychiatrists: Trump’s mental state is deteriorating dangerously due to impeachment with potentially ‘catastrophic outcomes’

    A group of mental health professionals led by a trio of preeminent psychiatrists is urging the House Judiciary Committee to consider President Trump's “dangerous” mental state arising from his “brittle sense of self-worth” as part of its inquiry into whether to approve articles of impeachment against him.

  • The 25 Best Sci-Fi Movies on Netflix Right Now
    Popular Mechanics

    The 25 Best Sci-Fi Movies on Netflix Right Now

    Rouge robots, deep space planets, and a voice assistant love story. From Popular Mechanics

  • Missile Shield: Romania Now Has America's Aegis Ashore
    The National Interest

    Missile Shield: Romania Now Has America's Aegis Ashore

    Key point: Washington has wanted to expand NATO's anti-missile capabilities for a while now. A key NATO missile-defense site in Romania on Aug. 9, 2019 completed a three-month upgrade process that had forced operators to take the system offline. To fill the resulting gap in coverage, the U.S. Army in May 2019 deployed to Romania one of its seven Terminal High-Altitude Area-Defense missile-interceptor batteries.

  • Virginia Commission Calls for Repeal of ‘Explicitly Racist’ and ‘Segregationist’ Laws
    National Review

    Virginia Commission Calls for Repeal of ‘Explicitly Racist’ and ‘Segregationist’ Laws

    A Virginia state commission released a report Thursday calling for the official repeal of “deeply troubling” state laws still on the books that contain “explicitly racist language and segregationist policies. The Commission to Examine Racial Inequity in Virginia Law published a lengthy report saying that the outdated laws should not “remain enshrined in law” despite no longer being in effect. The commission believes that such vestiges of Virginia's segregationist past should no longer have official status,” the report states.

  • Biden shows his tough side in Iowa and in attack ad: 'You're a dаmn liar'
    Yahoo News

    Biden shows his tough side in Iowa and in attack ad: 'You're a dаmn liar'

    Joe Biden came out swinging on the campaign trail this week, calling out a hostile questioner as a “damn liar” and rolling out a campaign ad meant to hit Donald Trump where it hurts him most — his ego. After enduring criticism about his measured response to Republican charges that he was implicated in a corrupt scheme to promote his son Hunter's business interests in Ukraine, Biden confronted a voter in Iowa who parroted that claim. “You're a damn liar, man,” Biden snapped at an attendee at a rally in New Hampton who accused him of landing his son a seat on the board of the energy company Burisma Holdings to profit from his position in the Obama administration.

  • Associated Press

    Report: Investigators ask about Illinois House leader

    The longest-serving state House speaker in modern American history is a subject of inquiries in an ongoing federal corruption investigation that has already entangled several top Illinois Democrats, according to a newspaper report published Thursday. Four people interviewed by investigators told the Chicago Tribune that FBI agents and prosecutors asked about Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan's ties to ComEd lobbyists, contracts the utility had with Madigan associates and government jobs those close to Madigan have landed. The Tribune did not name the four people and did not offer any additional details about them, including whether they themselves were former Madigan confidants.

  • A man arrested in Russia is accused of building a fake border with Finland 15 miles from the real one and charging migrants $11,000 to cross it
    INSIDER

    A man arrested in Russia is accused of building a fake border with Finland 15 miles from the real one and charging migrants $11,000 to cross it

    Authorities in western Russia arrested a man accused of building fake border posts and tricking migrants into believing they marked the state borders between Russia and Finland, the Interfax news agency reported. The incident happened in Russia's Vyborg region, which is about 15 miles from the actual border. The unidentified man from central Asia is accused of charging four South Asian migrants more than 10,000 euros, or $11,000, to help them cross what they believed was the EU border, Interfax reported, citing border agents.

  • The remarkable stories behind 5 iconic photos of the Pearl Harbor attack
    Business Insider

    The remarkable stories behind 5 iconic photos of the Pearl Harbor attack

    Photos of the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor captured the first bomb dropped, a destroyer exploding, and Battleship Row billowing with smoke. The attack on Pearl Harbor happened 78 years ago on Saturday. The Japanese attack on the US naval base in Hawaii killed more than 2,400 American sailors and civilians and wounded 1,000 more.

  • Six months of sacrifice: Hong Kong's protesters take stock
    AFP

    Six months of sacrifice: Hong Kong's protesters take stock

    With Beijing taking a hard line, it has since broadened into a call to halt authoritarian China's attempts to erode freedoms in the city. Protesters broke into the forecourt of the city's legislative building, throwing objects including metal bars at police. Officers responded with rubber bullets, bean bag rounds and tear gas against their aggressors, but then turned their weapons on the huge, peaceful crowds outside the complex, igniting anger that has fuelled the protests for months.

  • Reuters

    Nepal makes first arrest over 'menstrual hut' death

    KATHMANDU, Dec 5 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Police in Nepal have arrested the brother-in-law of a woman who died after she was banished to a 'menstrual hut', the first such arrest in the Himalayan nation as it seeks to end the practice. The body of Parbati Buda Rawat, 21, was found on Monday after she lit a fire to keep warm in a mud and stone hut and suffocated in Nepal's western Achhan district, the latest victim of the centuries-old, "chhaupadi" custom, outlawed in 2005. "This is the first time we have arrested any person in connection with a death under the chhaupadi custom," Achham's chief district officer, Bhoj Raj Shrestha, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.