Coronavirus impact on business

We're talking with business owners about the impact coronavirus is having on them.

  • Trump offers competing coronavirus messaging, warning of death but lamenting lockdown
    Yahoo News

    Trump offers competing coronavirus messaging, warning of death but lamenting lockdown

    President Trump appeared frustrated that the country would not emerge from its coronavirus lockdown in the near future even as he and other officials warned of a rising death toll and a continuance of restrictive measures for weeks and maybe months to come. There will be death,” Trump warned flatly at one point during Saturday's briefing of the White House coronavirus task force. More than 8,000 people in the United States have died from COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

  • Why does the coronavirus affect people differently? Yahoo News Explains
    Yahoo News

    Why does the coronavirus affect people differently? Yahoo News Explains

    Coronavirus patients are showing a wide range of symptoms and the exact reason why is still a mystery — but we do have some clues as to what factors can influence the severity of the disease. While the most common symptoms are fever, cough and shortness of breath, there are numerous reports of coronavirus patients experiencing nonrespiratory symptoms. A study of 204 patients in Huabie, China, published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology found that just over half of patients experienced gastrointestinal symptoms such as loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea.

  • 'Who gets the kids?' I took an oath to serve my patients. My family didn't, but we're all in this together.
    Yahoo News

    'Who gets the kids?' I took an oath to serve my patients. My family didn't, but we're all in this together.

    In Italy, new data show that 20 percent of health care workers tested positive for COVID-19. In the U.S., people in my age group, 20 to 44, who test positive for coronavirus have a one in five chance of requiring hospitalization, and about a fifth of those end up in an intensive care unit. If I get infected, my chance of dying is one in 500.

  • What does a state of emergency mean for Japan?
    AFP

    What does a state of emergency mean for Japan?

    Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe plans to announce a state of emergency as soon as Tuesday in several parts of the country, including Tokyo, where coronavirus infections are spiking. The declaration is not nationwide. It affects seven areas where medical experts believe the virus is now spreading rapidly, risking overloading the healthcare system.

  • Spain and EU commissioners call for common European debt instruments: newspaper
    Reuters

    Spain and EU commissioners call for common European debt instruments: newspaper

    Europe needs debt mutualisation and a common "Marshall Plan" to recover from the coronavirus pandemic, Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez told newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, even as Germany dismissed calls for the debt-pooling idea. EU leaders have tasked policymakers with finding a new way to finance a recovery from the COVID-19 outbreak, after Germany and the Netherlands ruled out calls from France, Italy and Spain to create a common debt instrument. Germany, among other nations, has long been opposed to issuing common debt with other European nations, arguing that it would stop individual countries from pursuing structural reforms and balancing their budgets.

  • Two children hospitalized after eating THC candy from a food bank
    NBC News

    Two children hospitalized after eating THC candy from a food bank

    At least two children are hospitalized after eating THC candy from a food bank in Utah. An 11-year-old and a 5-year-old were taken to a hospital Friday night after consuming “Medicated Nerds Rope” candy given to their families as part of a food distribution effort from a church working with the Utah Food Bank. Roy City Police said volunteers at the food bank distributed more than 60 bags that contained three to four servings of the candy rope.

  • Trump tempers officials' grave assessments with optimism
    Associated Press

    Trump tempers officials' grave assessments with optimism

    The U.S. surgeon general says that Americans should brace for levels of tragedy reminiscent of the Sept. 11 attacks and the bombing of Pearl Harbor, while the nation's infectious disease chief warned that the new coronavirus may never be completely eradicated from the globe. “We're starting to see light at the end of the tunnel,” Trump said at a Sunday evening White House briefing. Pence added, “We are beginning to see glimmers of progress.”

  • Coronavirus: Australia launches criminal investigation into Ruby Princess
    BBC

    Coronavirus: Australia launches criminal investigation into Ruby Princess

    A criminal investigation has been launched in Australia into how cruise ship passengers were allowed to disembark in Sydney despite some exhibiting flu-like symptoms. More than 600 people on board the Ruby Princess later tested positive for coronavirus and 10 have since died. The ship remains off the coast with nearly 200 sick crew members on board.

  • 3 countries have started to slow the coronavirus with total lockdowns. Here's how long they took to work.
    Business Insider

    3 countries have started to slow the coronavirus with total lockdowns. Here's how long they took to work.

    It has taken between three and four weeks since the countries ordered lockdowns for daily new infections and deaths to begin to decline. On Sunday, each country had recorded at least a two-day consecutive decline in deaths from the virus, and new recorded cases also appear to be dropping, according to figures on Worldometer. The numbers from China, however, suggest it may take more like a month for the impact on coronavirus deaths to really be felt.

  • Is Trump leading a 'war' against the coronavirus?
    Yahoo News Opinion

    Is Trump leading a 'war' against the coronavirus?

    Regular viewers of the White House coronavirus task force briefings have probably noticed certain recurring themes in President Trump's remarks: congratulating himself for acting swiftly to cut entry to the U.S. from China; praise for “the incredible people” on the podium with him and working behind the scenes; and an almost palpable yearning for a quick end to the pandemic and a resumption of “the greatest economy the world has ever seen.” Waging war on a disease is such a familiar trope it passes almost without notice: the “fight” against AIDS; the “struggle” to “conquer” smallpox, malaria, tuberculosis; health care workers on the “front lines” against Ebola, Zika, coronavirus.

  • Iranian Health Official Calls Chinese Coronavirus Stats a ‘Bitter Joke’
    National Review

    Iranian Health Official Calls Chinese Coronavirus Stats a ‘Bitter Joke’

    Iranian health ministry spokesman Kianush Jahanpur on Sunday criticized Chinese government statistics on the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak, appearing to blame those statistics for other countries' slow response to the emerging pandemic. “It seems statistics from China [were] a bitter joke, because many in the world thought this is just like influenza, with fewer deaths,” Jahanpur said during a video conference in remarks translated by Radio Farda. “This [impression] were based on reports from China and now it seems China made a bitter joke with the rest of the world.”

  • Health experts say official U.S. coronavirus death toll is understated
    The Week

    Health experts say official U.S. coronavirus death toll is understated

    Public health experts and government officials agree that the U.S. government's coronavirus death toll almost certainly understates how many Americans have actually died from the virus. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention only counts deaths where the presence of the coronavirus is confirmed in a lab test, The Washington Post reports, and "we know that it is an underestimation," CDC spokeswoman Kristen Nordlund said. The official death count is based on reports sent by states, and as of Sunday night, the CDC reports 304,826 confirmed U.S. cases and 7,616 deaths.

  • Japan’s Abe Set to Declare Virus Emergency As Cases Jump
    Bloomberg

    Japan’s Abe Set to Declare Virus Emergency As Cases Jump

    After last week saying the situation didn't yet call for such a move, Abe changed course and will announce the plan as soon as Monday, media reports said. The formal declaration for the Tokyo area will be coming as early as Tuesday, the Yomiuri newspaper reported without attribution. The declaration could also cover the surrounding prefectures of Chiba, Saitama and Kanagawa, as well as Osaka, and be given a time limit of six months, broadcaster TBS said, citing sources close to the matter.

  • Iran will never ask U.S. for coronavirus help: official
    Reuters

    Iran will never ask U.S. for coronavirus help: official

    Iran will never ask the United States for help in the fight against the new coronavirus, Foreign Ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said on Monday. Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has rejected offers from Washington for humanitarian assistance for Iran, the Middle Eastern country so far worst-affected by the coronavirus, with 3,739 deaths and 60,500 people infected according to the latest figures on Monday. "Iran has never asked and will not ask America to help Tehran in its fight against the outbreak ... But America should lift all its illegal unilateral sanctions on Iran," Mousavi said in a televised news conference.

  • Americans play the 'waiting game' after last passenger plane from Moscow canceled
    NBC News

    Americans play the 'waiting game' after last passenger plane from Moscow canceled

    A teacher whose father is suffering from cancer is one of scores of American citizens trapped in Russia after the last passenger flight to the U.S. was canceled amid the coronavirus pandemic. Grace Mitchell, 26, told NBC News that she had had no plans to leave her home in Rostov-on-Don in southern Russia until she got a phone call from her mother saying her father's cancer had taken a turn for the worse. "All we could do, really, was try to get the last flight out of Russia, because if I don't get a flight soon, then I probably won't see my dad ever again," Mitchell said.

  • Trump: U.S. approaching period ‘that is going to be very horrendous’
    Yahoo News Video

    Trump: U.S. approaching period ‘that is going to be very horrendous’

    President Trump on Saturday said that the United States is approaching a time that will be “very horrendous” for the nation amid the growing coronavirus outbreak across the country.

  • Philippine police reportedly shot a man dead under Duterte's orders to kill any lockdown troublemakers
    INSIDER

    Philippine police reportedly shot a man dead under Duterte's orders to kill any lockdown troublemakers

    Lisa Marie David/NurPhoto / Getty Philippine police reportedly killed a man for disobeying President Rodrigo Duterte's strict quarantine rules. The man, 63, threatened local officials with a scythe after they told him to wear a face mask, a local police report said, according to Al Jazeera. This appears to be the first reported case of someone being shot dead in the Philippines for disobeying lockdown rules.

  • Boris Johnson's government reportedly believes the coronavirus may have accidentally leaked from a Chinese laboratory
    Business Insider

    Boris Johnson's government reportedly believes the coronavirus may have accidentally leaked from a Chinese laboratory

    The UK government reportedly believes the coronavirus outbreak may have started in a Chinese laboratory. Most experts believe the outbreak began when animals passed COVID-19 onto humans in China. UK officials are not ruling out the possibility that a laboratory close to Wuhan accidentally leaked the virus.

  • Face masks: How the Trump administration went from 'no need' to 'put one on' to fight coronavirus
    Yahoo News

    Face masks: How the Trump administration went from 'no need' to 'put one on' to fight coronavirus

    Testifying on Capitol Hill on Feb. 28, Dr. Robert Redfield could not be more clear. “There is no need for these masks in the community,” Dr. Redfield said of the N95 masks that were then becoming the subject of intense focus, with the coronavirus outbreak having arrived on the West Coast of the United States. Coming from the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, this pronouncement had the weight of an official directive.

  • Trump’s Firing of Michael Atkinson Reveals His Real Priorities—and They’re Not Coronavirus
    The Daily Beast

    Trump’s Firing of Michael Atkinson Reveals His Real Priorities—and They’re Not Coronavirus

    The idea that you can't teach an old dog new tricks—especially one who's been rewarded for bad behavior—is particularly poignant when we consider President Trump's firing Friday of Michael Atkinson, the inspector general of the Intelligence Community. Trump has a track record of firing and retaliating against officials who don't blindly follow his orders and mimic his mood swings, no matter how unethical, illegal, dangerous, or irresponsible. At the same time, Trump has a track record of decimating our intelligence agencies.

  • Europe sees more signs of hope as Italy's virus curve falls
    Associated Press

    Europe sees more signs of hope as Italy's virus curve falls

    Europe saw further signs of hope in the coronavirus outbreak Sunday as Italy's daily death toll was at its lowest in more than two weeks and its infection curve was finally on a downward slope. Angelo Borrelli, the head of Italy's Civil Protection agency on Sunday, said there were 525 deaths in the 24-hour period since Saturday evening. Italy now has a total of 15,887 deaths and nearly 129,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases.

  • Coronavirus: Japan to declare emergency as Tokyo cases soar
    BBC

    Coronavirus: Japan to declare emergency as Tokyo cases soar

    Japan is to declare a state of emergency in the capital Tokyo and six other regions in an attempt to tackle the rapid spread of coronavirus. Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said the move could come as early as Tuesday. Japan has a relatively small number of infections compared to other countries, but there are concerns a sudden surge in cases in Tokyo could lead to a major outbreak in the world's biggest city.

  • Indians light lamps to heed Modi's call for coronavirus comradeship
    Reuters

    Indians light lamps to heed Modi's call for coronavirus comradeship

    Millions of Indians turned off their lights and lit up balconies and doorsteps with lamps, candles and flashlights on Sunday, in response to Prime Minister Narendra Modi's appeal to "challenge the darkness" spread by the coronavirus crisis. Modi, who imposed a three-week long nationwide lockdown on March 25, asked all citizens to turn out their lights for nine minutes at 9 p.m. local time on Sunday, and to display lamps and candles in a show of solidarity. Modi's call was met with a huge response, with many people lighting up their balconies.

  • U.S. coronavirus deaths near 10,000 as medical officials warn worst is yet to come
    NBC News

    U.S. coronavirus deaths near 10,000 as medical officials warn worst is yet to come

    With the number of people killed by the coronavirus in the United States nearing 10,000 on Monday, the country's top medical officials warned the worst was yet to come. The number of cases has ballooned to 337,752 — nearly three times higher than the second-worst hit country, Spain — with 9,619 people killed as of 5:10 am ET, according to NBC News' tracker. At the epicenter of the outbreak in the U.S., New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said critical medical supplies and staff have been secured but warned the magnitude of the crisis equals that of the Spanish flu and Great Depression.

  • Asia virus latest: Australia sends away ships, Pakistan hunts worshippers
    AFP

    Asia virus latest: Australia sends away ships, Pakistan hunts worshippers

    Here are the latest developments in Asia related to the coronavirus pandemic: - Australia sends cruise ships on their way - The largest maritime operation ever undertaken in Sydney Harbour was completed on Sunday with the successful restocking and refuelling of five cruise ships, Australian police said. It was part of government efforts since mid-March to force vessels to leave the country's waters to prevent any further spread of the coronavirus in Australia. Cruise ship guests have so far accounted for almost 10 percent of Australia's more than 5,500 infections.