Coronavirus Survivors Should Get $1K For Donating Plasma: NYC Pol

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NEW YORK, NY — A Manhattan lawmaker is trying to make it so New Yorkers who recover from the new coronavirus and donate their blood plasma for research can get a $1,000 tax credit.

State Sen. Brad Hoylman, whose district stretched from the Village to Central Park, introduced legislation Tuesday that would create a refundable personal income tax credit of $1,000 in New York for those who recover from COVID-19 and donate their blood plasma.

The tax credit would help encourage New Yorkers who recover from the virus to donate their blood plasma, which the Food and Drug Administration recently approved as a therapy for patients suffering from the disease. New York Blood Center has already started collecting the plasma at its Manhattan locations.

“The COVID-19 pandemic is the worst public health crisis to hit New York in more than a century—New Yorkers who survived the virus have a major role to play in our fight to find treatments and a cure," Hoylman said. "...As we race to conduct research and find a cure for COVID-19, New Yorkers who donate blood plasma deserve our thanks.”

The legislation would amend New York State tax law to create the tax credit and would take effect immediately, Hoylman said. It would be known as the "COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma Donation Credit."

The bill is the latest legislation Hoylman has introduced in the fight against the coronavirus.

Last week, the state senator introduced a bill that he said will help make the eventual coronavirus vaccine available to as many New Yorkers as possible by letting pharmacists and certified nurses administer it.

He has also introduced legislation that would allow local government and other civic bodies to meet virtually instead of in person and a bill to stop price-gouging of hand sanitizer, face masks and other medical products during a health emergency.


This article originally appeared on the West Village Patch

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