What you can do to avoid the new coronavirus variant

  • New variants of the coronavirus continue to emerge. But one in particular has caused concern in the U.S. because it is so contagious and spreading fast.
  • The variant known as B.1.1.7., which was first identified in Britain, doesn’t appear to cause more severe disease, but it has the potential to infect an estimated 50 percent more people.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has predicted that this variant could become the dominant source of infection in the United States by March.
  • To avoid it, you’ll need to double down on the same pandemic precautions that have kept you safe so far.

Staying Safe

What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

Here’s what to know about the symptoms and what to do if you have them. It's important to take precautions to protect not only your health, but also that of others.

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Will COVID-19 vaccines work on the new virus strains?

A coronavirus variant in the U.K. has caused alarm because it might spread more easily. But even if that turns out to be true, experts say the COVID-19 vaccines being rolled out will likely still work on the strain.

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Do I have a winter health issue or COVID-19?

From winter allergies to dry air, these are the differences between a seasonal problem and the coronavirus.

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Will the COVID-19 vaccine cause an allergic reaction?

The percentage of people who have actually experienced an allergic reaction to the Pfizer vaccine is low. Here's everything you need to know about vaccines and allergies.

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How can I persuade someone to get the COVID-19 vaccine?

Medical experts say vaccine-induced herd immunity is the best way to end the pandemic. Here's what everyday Americans can do to encourage their families, friends and community members to get the vaccine.

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Will travel bans help contain new coronavirus strains?

A newly identified variant of the coronavirus has led over 40 countries to impose travel restrictions against the United Kingdom, which registered a record number of daily cases.

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Am I immune to the coronavirus if I’ve already had it?

You have some immunity, but how much and for how long are still unanswered questions.

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What are the treatment options for COVID-19?

There are several treatment options, and which one is best depends on how sick someone is.

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How does the coronavirus affect the heart?

Even though it’s known as a respiratory virus, doctors believe the coronavirus can directly infect the heart muscle and cause other problems leading to heart damage.

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Public health glossary

What's the difference between quarantine and isolation? Here's a guide to the public health terms used in the coronavirus coverage.

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WHO's FAQ guide

See the World Health Organization's FAQ guide to get informed about the coronavirus.

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By the numbers

Cases by State

StatesConfirmedDeceased
California3,019,37134,433
Texas2,097,56031,831
Florida1,601,01524,965
New York 1,258,08741,098
Illinois1,081,35420,285
Ohio842,43310,409
Georgia828,44412,582
Pennsylvania783,17019,868
North Carolina690,9128,200
Arizona690,54411,528
Tennessee689,8088,470
Indiana598,3139,529
Michigan589,86914,766
Wisconsin573,1196,035
New Jersey555,29920,320
Massachusetts476,52613,749
Virginia455,5915,861
Minnesota449,4925,979
Missouri441,7896,461
Alabama429,6556,283
South Carolina399,8436,328
Colorado377,8565,388
Louisiana374,5828,383
Oklahoma360,3603,085
Maryland332,3536,689
Kentucky330,9073,194
Utah326,2211,507
Iowa307,5684,394
Washington291,9893,940
Arkansas273,5944,386
Nevada265,1433,863
Kansas263,4123,575
Mississippi256,8275,638
Connecticut232,2196,682
Nebraska182,1761,842
New Mexico164,9542,975
Idaho156,7781,637
Oregon134,4681,808
West Virginia111,6771,836
Rhode Island107,8762,058
Puerto Rico107,1581,272
South Dakota106,0636,109
North Dakota96,2221,387
Montana90,2551,094
Delaware71,7751,026
New Hampshire58,709938
Alaska52,222230
Wyoming49,922550
Maine34,963530
Washington34,403863
Hawaii24,546324
Vermont10,471165
Guam7,106118

News near you

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‘I felt emotional’ -NY teacher gets COVID shot

“So I am here to get my first vaccine…” New York City teacher Sari Rosenberg hasn't seen her students in person in nearly a year, but with her first COVID vaccine shot, she is one step closer to some measure of normalcy. “It’s the first step, you know, it’s not going to be right away, but the first step to getting back to seeing family and teaching my students in a classroom.” Rosenberg, who teaches high school history in Manhattan, on Tuesday morning was among the first teachers in the nation to get the first of a two-shot vaccine, just days after New York Governor Andrew Cuomo made teachers eligible. But the lack of a federal blueprint for mass inoculation means across the country, many teachers, including those in neighboring New Jersey, still don't qualify. “When I signed up and it went through, and I got the confirmation email, I was sitting over there on my couch, and I started crying. I've been hopeful that we would get through this at some point, but this felt like a really concrete moment of that there is hope, there is a light at the end of the tunnel.” In New York City, some in-person education has returned in the public school system, but Rosenberg is still concerned that inoculations alone won’t be enough to make classrooms safe. “I couldn't live with myself knowing that I was asymptomatic and passed it on to my students, who then brought it home to their families.” Scientists say more data is needed before we know whether individuals who have been vaccinated can still spread the virus. Until then, health officials have urged the public to stick with mask-wearing and social distancing even after getting the vaccine. Still, Rosenberg is looking forward to the day when millions of fellow teachers across the nation have all had their shots. “I just can't wait until all the teachers are vaccinated, and all the school staff and personnel are vaccinated, we can go back safely teach our kids.”
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