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CPD warrant policy changes announced in wake of botched raid

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Chicago Mayor Lightfoot and CPD Superintendent David Brown gave a search warrant policy update Wednesday morning.

Video Transcript

DIANE PATHIEU: Tanya and Terrell, the calls for change now being heard. Mayor Lightfoot joined Chicago Police Superintendent David Brown announcing sweeping changes in policy regarding search warrants. Her case made national headlines. Chicago police busted down the door of social worker Anjanette Young two years ago and left her there, standing naked and afraid, pleading for answers as they searched her home for over 40 minutes.

All along, police had the wrong place. City leaders called for a change in policy. And this morning, word from Mayor Lightfoot and Police Superintendent, David Brown, that change is coming.

DAVID BROWN: We must always work to improve. We must always focus special emphasis on continually improving our policies, training, transparency, and accountability.

DIANE PATHIEU: Mayor Lightfoot emphasized the need to respect the rights and basic human dignity of the residents involved. The new policy announces changes in procedures before, during, and after the execution of a search warrant. Some of those changes include, prior to the search warrant execution, all warrants will now have to be approved by a deputy chief or higher.

Members of the SWAT team only can serve no-knock warrants. They will be banned except in specific cases where lives or safety are in danger. And those warrants will require an independent investigation before approval and execution of the warrant.

During a warrant execution, a female officer, a lieutenant, or higher must be present for the serving of all search warrants. Officers will also be required to document any and all instances in which a firearm is pointed at someone.

And after the execution of a search warrant, if the warrant turns out to be false, it will be considered a wrong raid. And CPD will now conduct after-action review for all wrong raids. These reforms are in addition to added transparency the mayor already put into effect.

LORI LIGHTFOOT: People who believe that they were victimized shouldn't have to jump through lots of different groups and hire a lawyer in order to get access to information about what happened to them.

DIANE PATHIEU: Next up, the public will have 15 days to comment on the new policy changes. Mayor Lightfoot hopes to have the new changes in effect by the end of the month.