Creole-inspired Oyster Bar La Joie To Open In Cedar Park

Tony Cantu
·3 min read

CEDAR PARK, TX — La Joie, a new Creole-inspired oyster bar, is set to open its doors in Cedar Park next month, officials told Patch on Wednesday.

The new eatery on East Whitestone Blvd. in Cedar Park will open on Thursday, Nov. 19, for dine-in and takeout service, restaurant officials said. La Joie’s menu will feature authentic Creole specialties scratch-made by Executive Chef Nicholas Harrison such as Bouillabaisse, Duck and Seafood Gumbo, Shrimp n Grits, PoBoys, Tartare, and Boudin Balls. In addition, guests can choose from a variety of fresh, raw oysters selected and curated from oyster purveyors from the east and west coasts.

Since family is at the forefront of La Joie’s values, officials noted, it will also have options for kids available so there is something for the whole family. The fare is an elevated twist on Louisiana-style Creole from which the menu was inspired, where Chef Harrison was born and raised.

Chef Harrison brings years of experience to his role, including serving as Jr. Sous Chef at Austin’s very own Olamaie. His love of cooking — and a fascination with preparing Creole dishes in particular — comes from watching both of his grandmothers in the kitchen, officials explained. Cooking became his passion from an early age, officials added, and he has spent years perfecting his craft, pulling inspiration from those childhood weekends spent in Baton Rouge and Lafayette.

The restaurant’s name comes from the saying “C’est la joie”, meaning “it is joy,” which Chef Harrison’s grandmother used time and time again to express the joy she derived in cooking and teaching others to pursue their passions while passing techniques from generation to generation.

“For me, food has always been about family,” Harrison said in a prepared statement. “My grandma, Mamie, really helped fuel my joy for food, and I have many memories of helping her prepare meals and enjoying them around the dinner table with family. At La Joie, we want all of our guests to feel like when they dine with us, they’re a part of our family.”

Behind La Joie are owners Wade Nguyen (CEO), Tuan Le (Marketing Director), and Nicholas Harrison (Executive Chef). The restaurant’s design features southern style French architecture and decor.

As part of La Joie’s mission of supporting local and using the finest and freshest ingredients, the restaurant sources from Austin-based farmers and purveyors including Hausbar Farms, Texas Hill Country Olive Company, Ranger Cattle, Hi-Fi Mycology, Boggy Creek Farm, JBG Farms, and Round Rock Honey.

“When starting this venture, we wanted to open a restaurant that was based on experience and elevating the level of service,” said Nguyen. “We didn’t want to just be another startup restaurant, so we worked backward and asked ourselves important questions about our own dining experiences which became our road map to creating La Joie.”

As part of La Joie’s COVID-19 safety regulations, guests will be required to wear a mask when entering and moving around the restaurant, officials noted. Moreover, operators said all tables and chairs will be sanitized with EPA-approved cleaners in between guests and tables are spaced out a minimum of six feet. Hand sanitizer and both QR code and one-time-use menus will be available for guests. Employees are required to wear masks at all times and will have their temperatures checked at the start of their shifts. The restaurant will be open daily for dinner service from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m., to start.

About La Joie

La Joie, meaning “joy” in French, features authentic Creole and seafood dining expertly prepared by Owner and Executive Chef, Nicholas Harrison. At La Joie, we want you to experience the joys of cooking that come from generations of love, locally sourced ingredients and techniques passed down from grandma’s Louisiana kitchen. Come stay awhile in a place that feels like home with a friendly staff that feels like family. For more information on La Joie and to view their menu, visit lajoieaustin.com.

This article originally appeared on the Cedar Park-Leander Patch