Czech coronavirus quarantine measures extended to foreign residents

PRAGUE, March 7 (Reuters) - Foreign nationals living in the Czech Republic will have to enter a two-week coronavirus quarantine if they return to the country from Italy, the European nation hit hardest by the epidemic, Prime Minister Andrej Babis said on Saturday.

The step, which applies to foreigners with temporary or permanent Czech residency, extends the reach of quarantine measures announced on Friday for Czech citizens coming home from Italy.

Babis said police would start carrying out random checks at 10 land border crossings with Austria and Germany on Monday morning.

He added that the number of confirmed coronavirus cases had risen to 21, from the 19 reported on Friday. Twenty of the people infected with the virus had been to Italy or been in contact with people who had travelled there recently.

The remaining case is a woman who visited the U.S. city of Boston. (Reporting by Robert Muller Editing by Helen Popper)

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