Democrats' impeachment push moves to House Judiciary Committee

The House Judiciary Committee will hold its first public impeachment hearings as a new poll shows more Americans are against removing the president. Karl Rove reacts.

  • Buttigieg: I won't 'take lectures on family values' from Rush Limbaugh
    Yahoo News

    Buttigieg: I won't 'take lectures on family values' from Rush Limbaugh

    Former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg had a simple response on Sunday when asked about conservative talk show host Rush Limbaugh's questioning whether Americans are ready to back a gay candidate for president. "I'm proud of my husband," he said.

  • Gunmen kill 24 in attack on Burkina Faso church
    Reuters

    Gunmen kill 24 in attack on Burkina Faso church

    Gunmen killed twenty-four people, including a pastor, in an attack on a church during Sunday mass in northwestern Burkina Faso, four security sources told Reuters on Monday. It was not immediately clear who was responsible for the attack, which comes as jihadist groups with links to al Qaeda and Islamic State seek to gain control over once peaceful rural Burkina Faso, fuelling ethnic and religious conflict. The violence threatens to upend traditionally peaceful relations between Burkina Faso's majority Muslim community and its Christians, who represent up to a quarter of the population.

  • 'Red flag' gun-control proposal is a recipe for decreased safety and less freedom
    USA TODAY Opinion

    'Red flag' gun-control proposal is a recipe for decreased safety and less freedom

    The last thing these women want is an out-of-state billionaire telling them what to do. But that's exactly what New York billionaire and former mayor Michael Bloomberg is trying to do. Bloomberg's group Everytown for Gun Safety is buying $250,000 in television ads in Iowa to pressure lawmakers into adopting a “red flag” measure — a dangerous gun control scheme that would leave law-abiding Iowans defenseless.

  • Chinese President Xi knew severity of coronavirus weeks before going public; 40 Americans on cruise ship infected
    USA TODAY

    Chinese President Xi knew severity of coronavirus weeks before going public; 40 Americans on cruise ship infected

    President Xi Jinping on Sunday published a timeline of his actions to combat the coronavirus racing through China as the Communist Party worked to tamp down criticism of the government's handling of the crisis. The latest revelation comes as a U.S. health official said at least 40 Americans on a cruise ship in Japan are infected with the deadly new virus. “I issued demands during a Politburo Standing Committee meeting on Jan. 7 for work to contain the outbreak," Xi said in the speech.

  • Cruise passengers took Cambodia bus tours despite virus fears
    Yahoo News Video

    Cruise passengers took Cambodia bus tours despite virus fears

    A scramble intensified on Monday to trace passengers from a cruise liner —with more than 600 Americans aboard — allowed to disembark in Cambodia Thursday despite at least one traveler later being diagnosed with the coronavirus.

  • Inside the Family's Manhattan Apartment
    Architectural Digest

    Inside the Family's Manhattan Apartment

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  • Remember When Iran Took Out Saddam Hussein's Navy In One Day—With American-Made Jets?
    The National Interest

    Remember When Iran Took Out Saddam Hussein's Navy In One Day—With American-Made Jets?

    Key Point: In Operation Morvarid (“Pearl”) not only did they hope to take the Iraqi radars out of the picture but also Baghdad's vital oil infrastructure. On September 22, 1980 Saddam Hussein launched Iraq into a full-scale invasion of Iran—hoping to capitalize on Iran's instability due to the Iranian Revolution. Khorramshahr and Abadan, two major Iranian port cities just across and downstream the Shatt-al-Arab river from the major Iraqi oil-exporting port of Basra, were priority targets.

  • Bloomberg

    Sudan’s Ousted Leader Quizzed in Probe Into Islamist Financing

    Bashir, who was sentenced to two years in a rehabilitation facility in December for illicit possession of foreign currencies, appeared in front of the General Prosecutor on Sunday, according to a statement. It's the latest legal development for the 76-year-old former president, who was overthrown by the army in April after mass protests and is wanted by the International Criminal Court on accusations of war crimes in the western region of Darfur. Sudan's transitional government last week indicated he may face the ICC on those charges as part of a deal with rebels, though it wasn't immediately clear if he would be surrendered to the Hague or stand trial in another way.

  • Biden says he'd 'disown' anyone who made online attacks like Bernie Sanders' supporters
    Business Insider

    Biden says he'd 'disown' anyone who made online attacks like Bernie Sanders' supporters

    Associated Press/John Locher Former Vice President Joe Biden told NBC's "Meet The Press" he'd "disown" anyone who behaved online like Bernie Sanders' supporters. Sanders recently came under fire after some of his purported supporters bombarded leaders of the Culinary Workers Union with abusive and sexist messages after the union criticized "Medicare for All." Sanders himself has denounced the attacks and suggested they were not truly coming from his own supporters.

  • Man who left puppy to drown in cage sentenced to 1 year for animal cruelty
    NBC News

    Man who left puppy to drown in cage sentenced to 1 year for animal cruelty

    A New Jersey man who tried to leave an 8-month-old puppy to drown in a cage was sentenced to a year in state prison Friday. Aaron Davis, 36, was convicted of fourth-degree animal cruelty in December after leaving the pit bull in a cage along the rising tide of Sandy Hook Bay in July 2018, according to the Monmouth County Prosecutor. Luckily, a passerby noticed the crate in the early morning hours and climbed down a rocky barrier to save the puppy, who was later named River.

  • Cameroon army blames accident for village 'massacre'
    AFP

    Cameroon army blames accident for village 'massacre'

    Yaoundé (AFP) - Cameroon's army on Monday denied opposition charges that it had massacred villagers in a troubled English-speaking region, blaming instead an "unfortunate accident" caused by an explosion of fuel during a firefight. Up to 22 civilians, 14 of them children, died in the incident on Friday, according to the United Nations -- deaths which opposition parties blamed on members of the armed forces. Five civilians -- a woman and four children -- died, and "seven terrorists" were "neutralised", Atonfack told AFP in Libreville by phone.

  • Push for universal basic income will outlive Andrew Yang's 2020 presidential campaign
    USA TODAY Opinion

    Push for universal basic income will outlive Andrew Yang's 2020 presidential campaign

    Andrew Yang focused his surprisingly successful long-shot presidential campaign on a seemingly radical policy idea: universal basic income, or giving people monthly cash payments with no strings attached. He has dropped out of the 2020 race, but the push for UBI will live on. While the roots of this concept run through our country's history, with supporters who include Thomas Paine and Martin Luther King Jr., Yang is rightly credited with moving the idea of unconditional cash out of think tanks and academia and into living rooms across the country.

  • U.S. flies 338 Americans home from cruise ship, including 14 with coronavirus
    Reuters

    U.S. flies 338 Americans home from cruise ship, including 14 with coronavirus

    More than 300 Americans who had been stuck on a cruise ship affected by the coronavirus were back in the United States on Monday, flown to U.S. military bases for two more weeks of quarantine after spending the previous 14 days docked in Japan. Among those repatriated on a pair of U.S.-chartered jets were 14 people who tested positive for the fast-spreading virus, seven on each plane. The Diamond Princess cruise ship held by far the largest cluster of cases outside China, with more than 400 people infected out of some 3,700 on board.

  • A return to Auschwitz, 75 years after liberation
    CBS News

    A return to Auschwitz, 75 years after liberation

    "They're all important, but this is very important, 'cause it's one of the last ones we will do when we have the survivors," Lauder replied. Preserving Auschwitz has been Lauder's mission since his first visit in 1987, while he was the U.S. Ambassador to Austria. He is chairman of the Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial Foundation, and president of the World Jewish Congress.

  • American woman, 83, tests positive for coronavirus after disembarking Holland America ship
    USA TODAY

    American woman, 83, tests positive for coronavirus after disembarking Holland America ship

    A passenger who disembarked Holland America's MS Westerdam has been diagnosed with coronavirus in Malaysia. According to Holland America Line, an 83-year-old American woman who departed from Westerdam on Friday later reported feeling ill at the airport in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and tested positive for coronavirus. The passenger is in stable condition at a hospital in Malaysia, according to a release from the cruise line shared with USA TODAY by Buck Banks.

  • Hitler's Submarines Almost Launched A Missile Attack On America
    The National Interest

    Hitler's Submarines Almost Launched A Missile Attack On America

    Key point: Most Allied commanders were skeptical that there was a genuine threat to the continental United States—save for certain leaders of the U.S. Navy. In the closing weeks of World War II in Europe, American intelligence determined that a detachment of German submarines had been dispatched to launch a cruise missile attack on the East Coast of the United States. The U.S. Navy deployed forty-six ships and dozens of aircraft to annihilate the incoming submarine wolf pack.

  • As Trump Gives Up on ‘Endless Wars,' Russia, China, and Iran Move In
    The Daily Beast

    As Trump Gives Up on ‘Endless Wars,' Russia, China, and Iran Move In

    JERUSALEM–Two decades of expanding operations against what United States Special Operations Command called a “global insurgency of state and non-state actors” has led to fatigue at home and questions abroad about U.S. strategy. The latest Trump administration deal with the Taliban, challenges to the U.S. role in Syria and Iraq, and a potential reduction of forces in Africa point to a global trend in how the U.S. will deal with counter-insurgency in the future. What we're looking at is a global drawdown in U.S. forces committed to counter-terrorist operations at the same time President Donald Trump is demanding other countries, including NATO allies, do more.

  • Ocasio-Cortez faces 13 challengers – but can anyone unseat her?
    The Guardian

    Ocasio-Cortez faces 13 challengers – but can anyone unseat her?

    We don't see a lot of young people accomplish a lot because they're afraid – and she's not afraid. We knew who she was when we sent her, that she'd make a noise, and making a noise was why we sent her Abdul Abbas That's not how all see it. The first-term congresswoman is facing eight Republican and five Democratic candidates aiming to unseat her.

  • Costa Rican police find six tonnes of cocaine in biggest ever haul
    The Independent

    Costa Rican police find six tonnes of cocaine in biggest ever haul

    Police in Costa Rica have found almost 6 tonnes of cocaine in a shipping container, leading to the country's biggest ever drug seizure. The drugs, which weighed 5,800kg, were discovered on Friday evening in Limón in a container of flowers due to be sent to Rotterdam, Holland, according to the Costan Rican national newspaper La Nación. In a press conference on Saturday afternoon, interior minister Michael Soto Rojas confirmed it was the largest ever drug seizure in Costa Rica.

  • Seattle-area teachers reported fired for being gay; Catholic school says they resigned
    NBC News

    Seattle-area teachers reported fired for being gay; Catholic school says they resigned

    A Seattle-area Catholic school's claim that two teachers resigned has been disputed by allegations that they were forced out over their same-sex relationships. King County Council member Dave Upthegrove posted a statement from Kennedy Catholic High School in Burien, south of Seattle, that said two teachers, Paul Danforth and Michelle Beattie, "voluntarily resigned" from their positions. But Upthegrove claimed in his post that the teachers were forced out "solely because they are gay."

  • Cuba burning tires to power factory as US oil sanctions bite
    AFP

    Cuba burning tires to power factory as US oil sanctions bite

    The Cuban government has ordered a cement factory to burn old tires to power its operations and save on oil, amid a worsening fuel shortage brought on by US sanctions on the Communist island. On orders of President Miguel Diaz-Canel, the firm Cementos Cienfuegos, located in the center of the country, will receive an increasing supply of used tires to burn, the official daily Granma said Monday. Cuba has been suffering oil shortages since last September, when the administration of President Donald Trump imposed sanctions on ships carrying petroleum to the island from its main fuel supplier Venezuela.

  • Pakistan to consider importing insecticides from India to fight locusts
    Reuters

    Pakistan to consider importing insecticides from India to fight locusts

    Pakistan is likely to import insecticides from arch-rival India to brace itself for any locust attacks this summer, bypassing a ban on trade between the neighbouring nations. Pakistan severed all diplomatic and trade ties with New Delhi in August after India revoked the special status of Kashmir, a disputed territory between the two rivals, who have fought two of their three wars over the Himalayan region. "Yes definitely, there is a fear of locust attack in June- July, this is the reason we are planning and preparing in advance," Dr Falak Naz, Director General Department of Plant Protection, Ministry of National Food Security and Research, told Reuters.

  • Russian intelligence agents reportedly went to Ireland to inspect undersea cables, and it's reigniting fears they could cut them and take entire countries offline
    Business Insider

    Russian intelligence agents reportedly went to Ireland to inspect undersea cables, and it's reigniting fears they could cut them and take entire countries offline

    Submarine Cable Map Russian agents have been sent to Ireland to inspect its undersea cables, and it's sparking fears they could be tapped or cut in the future, according to The Sunday Times citing Irish police. Irish security services suspect that Russia's intelligence agency, the GRU, is using their country as a base to gather intelligence on targets in the EU and UK, The Sunday Times reported. The large number of tech companies that are based in Dublin could be another reason for Russia's suspected monitoring, an expert on transnational crime and Russian security told the newspaper.

  • Police allegedly held a black student at gunpoint. Now the governor wants an investigation
    USA TODAY

    Police allegedly held a black student at gunpoint. Now the governor wants an investigation

    The governor of Illinois on Thursday called for an investigation into allegations that police held a black college student at gunpoint after misidentifying him as a suspect. Gov. J.B. Pritzker's statement comes after Jaylan Butler, 20, sued the six officers involved for unlawful searches and seizure, excessive force and false arrest on a Sunday night last February. Butler, a swim team member at Eastern Illinois University, said he was walking back to the team bus near a rest stop off Interstate 80 when patrol cars pulled up to him.

  • North Korea vs. South Korea: Who Wins a War Straight-Up?
    The National Interest

    North Korea vs. South Korea: Who Wins a War Straight-Up?

    Key point: It's no accident that the North Korean military has evolved asymmetric means such as long range border artillery, light infantry, infiltration forces, and chemical and radiological units to counter the South's increasing technological superiority. In the last seventy years, the Republic of Korea Army (ROK Army) has evolved from a constabulary force into one of the largest, most powerful, technologically advanced armies in the world. This remarkable evolution is entirely due to the original 1950–53 invasion and war by neighboring North Korea.