• Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

Democrats rankled by 'insurgent' climate plan

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

This month the Democratic National Committee's council on climate change published a list of policy recommendations, which included allocating $10 to $16 trillion to shift the national economy away from fossil fuels.

And the mission statement raised hackles with some Democratic Party leaders.

Three people familiar with the matter told Reuters the tensions came because the committee's climate plan goes beyond presidential candidate Joe Biden's current proposals, highlighting the tricky nature of environmental politics.

"Number one, I'm not kidding, I would rejoin on day one the Paris Climate Accord and begin to organize the world and move forward."

The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee is trying to court young and progressive voters who view carbon emissions and climate change as a priority, and Biden has called global warming the "existential threat of our time."

But he has to be careful not to alienate voters in energy-producing swing states, such as Ohio and Pennsylvania, where a boom in natural gas drilled through a controversial method called "fracking" has fueled job growth.

The DNC's Climate Crisis Council this month called for a ban on fracking.

"But I would not shut it down, no."

That's at odds with Biden, who said in April he would restrict new drilling on federal lands, but would not prohibit the practice.

Two people close to the DNC said the climate council blindsided the party by publicly releasing the 14-page document on June 4.

The DNC and Biden campaign officials declined to comment.

Biden's campaign is updating its climate plan as it prepares for the Nov. 3 election contest against Republican President Donald Trump.

"The United States is now by far the number on producer of oil and natural gas anywhere in the world. By far."

Trump fervent advocate of fossil fuel drilling and mining who has downplayed climate change risks and unwound hundreds of environmental regulations.

Video Transcript

- This month, the Democratic National Committee's council on climate change published a list of policy recommendations, which included allocating $10 to $16 trillion to shift the national economy away from fossil fuels. And the mission statement raised hackles with some Democratic Party leaders. Three people familiar with the matter told Reuters the tensions came because the committee's climate plan goes beyond presidential candidate Joe Biden's current proposals, highlighting the tricky nature of environmental politics.

JOE BIDEN: Number one, I'm not kidding, I would rejoin on day one the Paris Climate Accord and begin to organize the world to move forward.

- The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee is trying to court young and progressive voters who view carbon emissions and climate change as a priority, and Biden has called global warming--

JOE BIDEN: --the existential threat of our time.

- But he has to be careful not to alienate voters in energy-producing swing states, such as Ohio and Pennsylvania, where a boom in natural gas drilled through a controversial method called fracking has fueled job growth. The DNC's Climate Crisis Council called for a ban on fracking.

JOE BIDEN: But I would not shut it down, no.

- That's at odds with Biden who said in April he would restrict new drilling on federal lands but would not prohibit the practice. Two people close to the DNC said the climate council blindsided the party by publicly releasing the 14-page document on June 4. The DNC and Biden campaign officials declined to comment. Biden's campaign is updating its climate plan as it prepares for the November 3 general-election contest against Republican President Donald Trump.

DONALD TRUMP: The United States is now by far the number-one producer of oil and natural gas anywhere in the world, by far.

- Trump is a fervent advocate of fossil-fuel drilling and mining who has downplayed climate-change risks and unwound hundreds of environmental regulations.