DEW answers some of your unemployment questions

The Department of Workforce and Unemployment answers some of your questions about unemployment.

  • Former head of pandemic response team speaks out: 'I'm frankly scared'
    Yahoo News

    Former head of pandemic response team speaks out: 'I'm frankly scared'

    The official who oversaw epidemic preparedness for the National Security Council under President Obama said the absence of public guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the COVID-19 pandemic leaves her “frankly scared” — and that eliminating her position weakened the American response to the coronavirus when it emerged 18 months later. Beth Cameron, who served as senior director for global health security and biodefense on the NSC until early 2017, was interviewed on the Yahoo News “Skullduggery” podcast. “I'm frankly scared that our CDC is not out in front talking about this,” Cameron said.

  • Taliban leverages pandemic to burnish image as violence in Afghanistan surges
    NBC News

    Taliban leverages pandemic to burnish image as violence in Afghanistan surges

    A perfect storm has gathered over one of the world's most benighted nations, Afghanistan, where ordinary citizens are facing a fresh form of misery. Taliban militants have announced they will keep fighting since they say there have been no confirmed cases of COVID-19 in areas under the group's control, a senior militant in the province of Ghazni has told NBC News. An exception to the ongoing tensions will be a three-day Eid ceasefire starting Sunday, the Taliban announced in a tweet Saturday.

  • Ohio public health officials apologized after releasing mask guidance for African Americans to avoid wearing face coverings with 'gang symbolism'
    Business Insider

    Ohio public health officials apologized after releasing mask guidance for African Americans to avoid wearing face coverings with 'gang symbolism'

    Bebeto Matthews/AP Images Public health officials in Ohio's most populous county on Wednesday apologized after releasing guidelines that encouraged African Americans and "communities of color" to avoid wearing facial coverings associated with "gang symbolism." The guidance that minority communities should avoid "fabrics that elicit deeply held stereotypes," including "bandanas," "skull prints," and "horror prints." The Franklin County Department of Public Health also advised against wearing red or blue bandanas "as these are typically associated with gang symbolism."

  • Pakistan plane crash survivor: 'All I could see was fire'
    BBC

    Pakistan plane crash survivor: 'All I could see was fire'

    One of the survivors of Friday's plane crash in the Pakistani city of Karachi has described his ordeal, saying all he could see "was fire". Passenger Muhammad Zubair was one of at least two passengers who survived after the Pakistan International Airlines (PIA) Airbus A320 came down in a residential area. It came days after Pakistan allowed commercial flights to resume after the country's coronavirus lockdown was eased.

  • Is international travel allowed yet? See when Spain, Mexico, Iceland plan to reopen borders
    USA TODAY

    Is international travel allowed yet? See when Spain, Mexico, Iceland plan to reopen borders

    Americans with a bad case of wanderlust may have to wait until later this summer to vacation abroad – and while some countries, including Spain, have announced target dates to reopen, the pickings will be slim for a while. Parts of Mexico and the Caribbean have targeted dates in early to mid-June for reopening from coronavirus restrictions, but Europe will lag, opening first to other citizens of European Union and Schengen Area countries before welcoming international visitors at a later date. At least one EU member nation has announced a target window, however: Spain's prime minister announced Saturday that his country will reopen to foreign tourists sometime in July, though he did not specify a date.

  • Moscow espionage trial of ex-US marine Whelan to wrap up
    AFP

    Moscow espionage trial of ex-US marine Whelan to wrap up

    The trial in Moscow of ex-US marine Paul Whelan on espionage charges is set to conclude Monday, ending a court proceeding that has strained ties with Washington and fuelled speculation of a prisoner exchange. Whelan, 50, who also holds Irish, Canadian and British citizenship, was detained in Moscow in December 2018 for allegedly receiving state secrets. "In a just system, the court would acquit Paul based on the lack of evidence," Whelan's brother David said in a statement ahead of the hearing.

  • Hong Kong shares ease on China-U.S. rift, dollar firms
    Reuters

    Hong Kong shares ease on China-U.S. rift, dollar firms

    Hong Kong shares extended losses and a gauge of Asian stocks was largely subdued on Monday, after China's move to impose a new security law on Hong Kong heightened concerns about the future stability of the city and global trade prospects. Hong Kong's HSI index fell 0.4% after sinking 5.5% on Friday, when Beijing proposed the new security legislation that sparked protests across the island over the weekend. The broader MSCI's index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan was 0.3% higher on thin volume, with South Korea, Australia and New Zealand all trading higher.

  • Charlamagne Tha God Reacts to Joe Biden’s ‘You Ain’t Black’ Apology
    The Daily Beast

    Charlamagne Tha God Reacts to Joe Biden’s ‘You Ain’t Black’ Apology

    MSNBC's Joy Reid opened her interview with Charlamagne Tha God on Sunday morning by congratulating him on his interview this past week with former Vice President Joe Biden—even if all anyone wants to talk about are the final few seconds. “You've got more questions?” Biden asked. Shortly after that interview, Biden apologized for his remarks on a conference call with the Black Chamber of Commerce.

  • Georgia reopened first. What the data show is a matter of fierce debate
    LA Times

    Georgia reopened first. What the data show is a matter of fierce debate

    Nearly a month after Georgia became the first state to allow businesses to reopen after the coronavirus shutdown, Gov. Brian Kemp took to a conservative radio show to tout some good news. Hospitalizations were down more than 30% in less than three weeks, and Georgia had ramped up its testing, with a per capita rate that placed it 20th out of 54 U.S. states and territories, up from 46th a month ago, he explained. The Columbus Ledger-Enquirer reported that unlike many other states, Georgia calculates its total number of tests by combining viral diagnostic checks, which indicate current infection, and antibody tests, which indicate past infection.

  • Letters to the Editor: Why is the Trump administration working so hard to deport immigrant children?
    Los Angeles Times Opinion

    Letters to the Editor: Why is the Trump administration working so hard to deport immigrant children?

    To the editor: The appalling actions taken by the Trump administration against immigrant children is incomprehensible and is the clearest reflection of its moral decay. Trump and his allies have claimed again and again that they welcome immigrants who enter the country legally, yet while lawyers and sponsors struggle to follow the rules, our government moves these children from place to place without warning, will not disclose their whereabouts, and fast-tracks deportations to places so dangerous that they were willing to walk thousands of miles to escape them. To the editor: Compassion is yet another presidential quality that is missing in our current president.

  • Two dead in severe storms in Carolinas; thousands without power
    NBC News

    Two dead in severe storms in Carolinas; thousands without power

    Heavy rains and strong winds knocked down trees and power lines, leaving over 45,000 homes and businesses without power on Saturday morning. Emergency workers also responded to a deadly crash in Lancaster County, South Carolina, where strong winds uprooted a tree and utility pole that fell onto a pickup truck, killing the driver. Authorities identified the deceased driver as 57-year-old Joe Dale Humphries.

  • Oxford scientists working on a coronavirus vaccine say there is now only a 50% chance of success because the number of UK cases is falling too quickly
    Business Insider

    Oxford scientists working on a coronavirus vaccine say there is now only a 50% chance of success because the number of UK cases is falling too quickly

    YouTube/University of Oxford Oxford scientists working on a coronavirus vaccine say the chances of success are now 50%. They say that's because the number of people with the virus in the UK is falling too quickly. "At the moment, there's a 50% chance that we get no result at all," scientist Adam Hill said this weekend.

  • Coronavirus: New York state daily death toll drop below 100
    BBC

    Coronavirus: New York state daily death toll drop below 100

    New York state's daily death toll has dropped below 100 for the first time since March. A total of 84 people died in the last 24 hours, Governor Andrew Cuomo said on Saturday, compared with 109 a day before. During the height of the outbreak in April, more than 1,000 people a day were losing their lives in worst-hit US state.

  • Expletive-filled video of Bolsonaro swearing at cabinet meeting released by Brazil's Supreme Court
    The Independent

    Expletive-filled video of Bolsonaro swearing at cabinet meeting released by Brazil's Supreme Court

    The populist president, who has faced sustained criticism over his approach to the coronavirus emergency as Brazil's death toll surges to over 20,000, is at the centre of a criminal investigation into claims he sought to replace top federal police officials. Sergio Moro, the ex Justice Minister, alleges Mr Bolsonaro sacked the federal police chief as he wanted someone in the position who would feed him police intelligence. Mr Moro, who headed up a major corruption clampdown, handed in his notice last month after Mr Bolsonaro sacked the federal police director-general without conferring with him.

  • Firefighters Battle Major Warehouse Fire on San Francisco's Famed Fisherman's Wharf
    Time

    Firefighters Battle Major Warehouse Fire on San Francisco's Famed Fisherman's Wharf

    A major warehouse fire broke out on Fisherman's Wharf Pier 45 in San Francisco early Saturday morning. Firefighters began to responding to the warehouse fire on Fisherman's Wharf's — one of San Francisco's main tourist attractions — at 4:17 a.m. PDT, according to updates from the San Francisco Fire Department.The fire was reported on the Wharf's Pier 45, which includes national historic landmarks the U.S.S. Pampanito and S.S. Jeremiah O'Brien, two military ships from World War II. While the fire spread from the original warehouse to two other buildings, firefighters were able to prevent the fire from reaching the S.S. Jeremiah O'Brien, according to tweets from from the San Francisco Fire Department.

  • Xi says China could have set GDP growth goal around 6% had there been no coronavirus
    Reuters

    Xi says China could have set GDP growth goal around 6% had there been no coronavirus

    Chinese President Xi Jinping said China's annual economic growth target could have been set around 6% had the new coronavirus epidemic not happened, according to state media reports on Saturday. The Chinese government on Friday omitted a gross domestic product (GDP) growth target for 2020 in its yearly work report unveiled at the start of the annual meeting of parliament, citing uncertainties brought on by the epidemic. "If the epidemic hadn't happened, under general circumstances, the GDP growth target would be set around 6%," Xi told a parliamentary group discussion on Friday, according to state media.

  • Former head of pandemic response team at the NSC speaks out: 'I'm frankly scared'
    Yahoo News Video

    Former head of pandemic response team at the NSC speaks out: 'I'm frankly scared'

    The official who oversaw epidemic preparedness for the National Security Council under President Obama said the absence of public guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during the COVID-19 pandemic leaves her “frankly scared. She also believes and that eliminating her position weakened the American response to the coronavirus when it emerged 18 months later.

  • The Statue of Liberty as you've never seen her before
    CBS News

    The Statue of Liberty as you've never seen her before

    Last summer, architect Paul Davidson spent ten nights inside of the Statue of Liberty. From 6 p.m. to 7 a.m., he and his team carried out a first-of-its-kind laser scan of Lady Liberty, capturing the statue's interior during the hours when it wasn't packed full of tourists. Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty are currently closed to all visitors, shut down due to COVID-19.

  • Spain to reopen to tourists as South America named virus hotspot
    AFP Relax News

    Spain to reopen to tourists as South America named virus hotspot

    Spain said on Saturday it would let in foreign tourists and restart top league football in the coming weeks, accelerating Europe's exit from strict virus lockdown, as South America was labelled "a new epicentre" by the World Health Organization. Brazil led the surge across South America, its death toll passing 21,000 on Friday from 330,000 infections, the third biggest caseload of any country in a pandemic that has infected 5.25 million globally and killed more than 338,000.

  • Decision not to extend Pa. vote-by-mail deadline could lower AAPI turnout
    NBC News

    Decision not to extend Pa. vote-by-mail deadline could lower AAPI turnout

    A state Supreme Court decision not to extend Pennsylvania's June 2 vote-by-mail deadline could depress turnout for many of the state's more than 400,000 Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, advocates say. Organizers with the Southeast Asian Mutual Assistance Associations Coalition, a South Philadelphia-based nonprofit that was among the plaintiffs in the court case calling for an extension, said the extra time is needed so the thousands of low-income AAPI residents it serves can properly complete and return their mail-in ballots amid the coronavirus pandemic. Many of its constituents require assistance requesting and translating ballots — a task that has become more difficult and time-consuming as the crisis has halted in-person contact.

  • Japan set to lift coronavirus emergency as cases slow
    AFP

    Japan set to lift coronavirus emergency as cases slow

    Japan was poised to lift its nationwide state of emergency over the coronavirus on Monday, gradually reopening the world's third-biggest economy after new cases slowed to a crawl. Compared with hard-hit areas in Europe, the United States, Russia and Brazil, Japan has been spared the worst of the pandemic, with 16,581 cases in total and 830 deaths. Businesses and schools were urged to shut and people were requested to remain home but Japan's "lockdown" was far softer than in other parts of the world and there was no punishment for anyone flouting the rules.

  • Gov. Cuomo: travelers from Europe 'brought the virus to New York'
    Business Insider

    Gov. Cuomo: travelers from Europe 'brought the virus to New York'

    Cuomo cited reporting from The Washington Post suggesting that President Trump's European travel ban, which had been instituted in March, caused "one final viral infusion" as Americans fled some of the initial pandemic epicenters outside of China, like Italy and Spain. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo on Sunday said that travelers coming to the US from Europe were to blame for spreading the virus widely in the state in the initial days of its outbreak.

  • How the Restaurant Industry Viciously Exploits Its Workers, From Wage Theft to Sexual Abuse
    The Daily Beast

    How the Restaurant Industry Viciously Exploits Its Workers, From Wage Theft to Sexual Abuse

    This NRA “represent[s] and advocate[s] on behalf of more than 500,000 restaurant businesses,” including some of the biggest chains in the country. For decades, this has meant keeping tipped workers earning a minimum of $2.13 an hour in 43 states (in California, where I live, tipped workers must earn at least the state-wide minimum wage of $12.00 per hour for employers with 25 or fewer employees and $13.00 per hour for employers with more than 25 employees). The so-called logic behind this $2.13 tipped worker minimum wage is that tips will meet or exceed the federal minimum wage of $7.25 and, legally speaking, when they don't, employers must make up the difference.

  • Western Australia hit by 'once-in-a-decade' storm
    BBC

    Western Australia hit by 'once-in-a-decade' storm

    Western Australia has been battered by a massive storm which ripped roofs off houses and downed trees across a 1,000km (620 miles) stretch of land. More than 60,000 homes were without power on Monday - most in the main city, Perth. The state's south was particularly hard hit with dust storms, torrential rain and huge waves along the coast.

  • Singaporean cooks up Eid feast for migrant workers in lockdown
    Reuters

    Singaporean cooks up Eid feast for migrant workers in lockdown

    As Muslims around the world celebrate Eid al-Fitr to mark the end of the fasting month, thousands of migrant workers in Singapore have had to spend the holiday in quarantine because of outbreaks of the novel coronavirus in their dormitories. To cheer them up, Singaporean business Dushyant Kumar, his wife and a team of chefs cooked up a giant biryani for a Sunday evening Eid feast for at least 600 migrants. Kumar used a family recipe for the South Asian rice dish often eaten during festive occasions.