Did you know spring cleaning can boost your mental health?

·2 min read
An employee weeds a tulip bed in the Ashton Gardens at Thanksgiving Point in Lehi on Thursday, April 30, 2020. Spring cleaning can boost your mental health.
An employee weeds a tulip bed in the Ashton Gardens at Thanksgiving Point in Lehi on Thursday, April 30, 2020. Spring cleaning can boost your mental health. | Steve Griffin, Deseret News

With dreary winter skies still looming, a good spring cleaning may be just the thing to give your mental health a boost until spring arrives.

Here’s why.

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Why is spring cleaning a mental health boost? The Deseret News reported that spring cleaning can have “positive impacts on your mental health” and is viewed as a transitional time as one gets rid of clutter and organizes their life.

“Decluttering some of our old habits and rejuvenating positive endeavors, such as creative projects, will help us start the new spring season refreshed,” the Jefferson Center, a nonprofit mental health care provider, reported.

Vogue reported that cleaning can give one a sense of control and that the ritualistic nature of cleaning plays a “powerful role in our lives.”

If one has clutter around them, they may feel more stuck and unmotivated with higher levels of anxiety than they would after cleaning the space around them, according to the nonprofit mental health services organization Centerstone.

But taking charge of your environment is just one part of spring cleaning — the other part is taking charge of your mind.

The Princeton Alumni Weekly reported that a person’s focus becomes overstimulated while trying to focus on surrounding items or clutter and can lead to anxiety.

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Spring cleaning is also cleaning your mind. Healthline reported that clinical psychologist and organizing expert Tricia Wolanin said, “When we clear clutter it has the potential to clear our mental space and attention span.”

An article published by Nature reported that while physical decluttering is important, so is a mental decluttering.

Diane Rochford, president of the British Society of Dental Hygienists and Therapists, wrote, “One of the easiest ways to declutter your mental space is to cultivate some quiet time for yourself. Although we all have busy schedules, if you can carve out even half an hour of time to do a relaxing activity, this can have a great impact on your mental health.”