Here’s how Dodgers’ Cody Bellinger’s two-run homer turned into one and an out

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Sarah Valenzuela, New York Daily News
·2 min read
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How bizarre.

In the top of the third inning of a game between the Dodgers and the Rockies at Coors Field, center fielder Cody Bellinger knocked a long ball just over the wall, into the left field seats, with third baseman Justin Turner at first. It seemed like an exceptional start to the season for Bellinger and the Dodgers. But what would have been an easy two runs, turned into just one.

When the ball left Bellinger’s bat for the outfield, Raimel Tapia, the Rockies’ left fielder, chased it down and nearly stole the run from Bellinger. Slowed down video showed Tapia catch the ball, but never kept possession of it. And from Turner’s spot on the field, the ball was caught for an out. He never saw the ball escape Tapia’s glove.

Turner, who was already rounding second, once he saw the ball hit Tapia’s glove, turned and sprinted back toward first, past Bellinger. Bellinger was already on his way to second trying to get Turner’s attention to turn back around to go home. As soon as Bellinger crossed Turner, the umpires started to signal and the two runners idled, trying to figure out the call.

MLB rules dictate that if runners pass each other on the base paths, the runner who did the passing is out. In this case, Turner was the runner in front and Bellinger passed him.

The call was eventually ruled a one-run homer, with Bellinger as the out.

This doesn’t exactly happen often in the league. The last time if did was back in April of 2019 in a game between the Tigers and the White Sox and the last time it happened in the minors was back in 1924, according to RetroSheet.

If this was foreshadowing another weird season, then baseball fans should strap in now.