Donors wary of working with electoral objectors like Cruz, Hawley

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Marriott International Inc said they will suspend donations to lawmakers who voted against certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s victory

Many of America’s top business people are irritated and exhausted by political pandering to the mob, and plan to cut off future contributions to those who encouraged it.

Senators like Josh Hawley and Ted Cruz apparently have aspirations to run for president in 2024, and have shamelessly coveted Trump’s supporters. But their flagrant pursuit of the rioters that participated in the violent siege on the Capitol has alienated some of those who could have helped fund those campaigns.

Read More: At least 140 Republicans expected to vote against Electoral College count

On Monday night, 36 hours before the insurrection, Yale School of Management professor Jeffrey Sonnenfeld invited a group of high-profile CEOs and investors to a virtual meeting at 7a.m. the following morning, to discuss expected congressional objections to the presidential certification process, Axios reported.

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One attendee told Axios: “The amount of anger at these 11 senators [those that voted against the Electoral College results] was more intense than any I can recall directed with so much universality. There is real anger at these people, particularly Hawley and Cruz, that they don’t really understand. We all know we need public/private partnership to get through this pandemic, and these 11 are doing something they know is wrong, which hurts those efforts, for purely personal reasons.”

Axios sources say that one topic of conversation, and agreement, was to no longer financially support congressional election deniers and electoral certification resistors, either directly or indirectly.

Read More: Joe Biden wants Ted Cruz ousted from the Senate in 2024

Withdrawing their financial support from election deniers, Marriott International Inc, the world’s largest hotel company, and the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association (BCBSA) said Sunday they will suspend donations to U.S. lawmakers who voted last week against certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s electoral votes, Reuters reported.

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“We have taken the destructive events at the Capitol to undermine a legitimate and fair election into consideration and will be pausing political giving from our Political Action Committee to those who voted against certification of the election,” Marriott spokeswoman Connie Kim said.

JPMorgan Chase said on Sunday that it will pause all contributions from its political action committee for at least the next six months, saying “the focus of business leaders, political leaders, civic leaders right now should be on governing and getting help to those who desperately need it most right now. There will be plenty of time for campaigning later.”

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The post Donors wary of working with electoral objectors like Cruz, Hawley appeared first on TheGrio.

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