Alexander cruises to NC House win, Cotham wins crowded House race | Latest results

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Former state representative and educator Tricia Cotham won Tuesday’s primary for what was Mecklenburg County’s most crowded North Carolina State House race, according to unofficial results.

The race featured four Democrats, including two former state representatives, Cotham and Rodney Moore — although Moore announced last week that he was dropping out of the race.

District 112 is a new district, created during the redistricting process this year. Much of it is in the old District 99, which is represented by Democrat Nasif Majeed.

After the court redrew North Carolina’ election maps, District 99 shifted north. Majeed is running for that district, leaving the District 112 field open to the four Democratic competitors.

District 112 includes most everything east of Idlewood Acres and E. W.T. Harris Boulevard, and a majority of the town of Mint Hill. It stops at the Union and Cabarrus county lines.

The winner will face Republican Tony Long in the November general election.

Results show Cotham with 48.2% of the vote with all 15 precincts reporting in Mecklenburg County. Educator Yolanda Holmes had the next highest vote tally, with 31.1%. Johnell ‘Jay’ Holman had 16.9% of the vote. Moore captured 3.8% of the vote so far.

In a statement shared with The Charlotte Observer, Cotham — the daughter of county commissioner Pat Cotham — thanked her supporters.

“I am honored to have this opportunity and look forward to continuing our campaign to November to ensure this new seat sends an experienced and battle-tested Democrat to the State House,” Cotham said.

More than 43,000 people voted early this year — more than in other non-presidential primary on record — Mecklenburg Board of Elections data show.

Other local House, Senate races

Results showed a close race in another local Senate race.

Republicans Scott Stone and Cheryl Russo were locked in a tight race for Senate District 42. With all 47 precincts reporting, Russo held a slight lead over Stone, with 50.6% of the vote to Stone’s 49.4%.

The primary sets up an interesting test for Republicans in November as the winner will face off against Democrat Rachel Hunt. Republicans will look to add another representative to the state legislature.

Vickie Sawyer held a significant lead over her challenger Tom Fyler in the Republican primary for Senate District 37.

Sawyer was first elected in 2018 to represent the district. This year’s Republican primary was for the newly-established District 37, which now dips into northern Mecklenburg County. The district stretches north to Iredell County and includes Statesville.

There is no Democrat running for the seat in the November General Election.

Sawyer had 82.4% of the vote, with all 33 precincts reporting results. Fyler had 17.6% of the vote, results show.

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Results in for House District 103

In the race for House District 103, attorney Laura Budd held a lead over her opponent Ann Harlan.

The winner of the race will face Republican Bill Brawley in the General Election. The district includes Matthews. Budd and Harlan were running to fill the swing seat vacated by Rep. Rachel Hunt, who is running for N.C. Senate.

With all 17 precincts reporting, Budd had 56.9% of the vote; Harlan had 43.1%.

Kelly Alexander, a funeral director who went to West Charlotte High, held a big lead over fellow Democrat Vermanno Bowman in the race for House District 107. Alexander is an incumbent who was elected to the district in 2009.

With all 11 precincts reporting in Mecklenburg County, Alexander had 83.5% of the vote while Bowman had 16.5%.

Reached Tuesday night, Alexander said the results in his favor were an important step along the road to what he hopes will be a Democratic majority in either the House or the Senate.

“If we are going to expand Medicaid and if we are able to improve teacher pay, have some of the support services that people believe are necessary to improve public education, all of that takes money and will power,” Alexander said. “It takes people working together not just in one political party but folks from across the aisle.”

He attributed his success in the primary to listening and responding to concerns raised by his constituents, like helping people reintegrate into society after being incarcerated.

Alexander will face Republican Mark Alan Cook in November. The district is just south of Huntersville.