Fox News' Elisabeth Hasselbeck compares NFL's domestic abuse cases with Benghazi

Dylan Stableford, Yahoo News
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FILE - This Feb. 11, 2010 file photo shows TV personality Elisabeth Hasselbeck at The Heart Truth's Red Dress Collection 2010 fashion show in New York. Hasselbeck debuts as Steve Doocy and Brian Kilmeade's new partner on "Fox & Friends" Monday, Sept 16, 2013, after the departing Gretchen Carlson offered farewells on Friday. (AP Photo/Evan Agostini, file)

"Fox & Friends" host Elisabeth Hasselbeck took to Twitter on Tuesday to compare the controversy over the NFL's handling of domestic abuse cases and the White House's handling of the Sept. 11, 2012, terror attack on American facilities in Benghazi, Libya.

"Imagine if everyone that asked for transparency in the #nfl @nfl Demanded that same #transparency in our #government #Benghazi," Hasselbeck wrote on Twitter.



Hasselbeck's tweet comes amid calls for NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell to resign over his response to the domestic abuse cases involving former Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice and Adrian Peterson, and a day before the House Select Committee on Benghazi’s first open hearing.

Hasselbeck, who left "The View" to join Fox News in 2013, has a personal interest in both. She is married to former NFL quarterback Tim Hasselbeck, now an ESPN analyst.

Goodell's wife, Jane Skinner, was an anchor for Fox News from 1998 to 2010.

Fox News has been criticized for what some call an obsession with placing the blame for Benghazi on the Obama administration. According to a study conducted by liberal watchdog group Media Matters, Fox News' primetime lineup ran 1,098 segments on Benghazi in the first 20 months following the attacks, including 281 segments alleging a "coverup" by the Obama administration.

Later, Hasselbeck responded to one critic who said the insertion of Benghazi was "ridiculous."

 Hasselbeck is not the only "Fox & Friends" host to stir controversy while weighing in on the NFL's domestic abuse problem.

Last week, her co-hosts, Brian Kilmeade and Steve Doocy, joked about a lesson to be learned from the video showing Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice knocking his then-fiancee unconscious in an elevator.

"I think the message is, take the stairs," Kilmeade said during a discussion of the video.

"The message is, when you're in an elevator, there are cameras," co-host Steve Doocy added.