New Elizabeth Banks movie ‘Call Jane’ to film in Hartford

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Christopher Arnott, Hartford Courant
·1 min read
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A major motion picture about the underground abortion movement in the 1960s , “Call Jane,” is filming some scenes in Hartford, according to a casting call issued this week.

It is not clear which if any of the stars of the film, which include Kate Mara (from the TV series “House of Cards” and “Pose”), Elizabeth Banks (”The Hunger Games”), Sigourney Weaver (“Alien” and “Ghostbusters”), Chris Messina (”Devil”) and Wunmi Mosaku (”Lovecraft Country”), will be in the scenes filmed here.

The casting call was posted by Citrolla Casting, a small casting agency based in New York City. The notice reads: “If you’d like to be considered for the Feature Film “Call Jane”, please fill out the form below. All background roles are paid. This will be filming in Hartford, CT. Call Jane is a women’s rights indie drama directed by ‘Carol’ screenwriter Phyllis Nagy.”

Nagy is also known as the writer/director of the true-crime TV movie “Mrs. Harris,” starring Annette Bening. The script was written by the co-creators of the TV medical series “The Resident,” Hayley Schore and Roshan Sethi.

“Call Jane” is described on the website of Protagonist Pictures this way: “Joy (Elizabeth Banks), a traditional ’60 1/4 u2032s American housewife, is desperate for a second child. However, the wonderful news of her pregnancy is tainted by the threat it poses to her own life. She has nowhere to turn until she stumbles upon the Janes, an underground group of ordinary women united by Virginia (Sigourney Weaver), who risk everything to provide people like Joy with choices. They save Joy’s life and give her a burning sense of purpose: to help other women take control of their destinies.”

Christopher Arnott can be reached at carnott@courant.com.