Elizabeth Warren: 'I would make a better president than Bernie'

Jeva Lange

With Super Tuesday looming, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has cemented himself as the man to beat in the Democratic primary. During Tuesday night's debate in South Carolina, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren rose to the challenge in her most direct attack on her progressive colleague to date. "The way I see this is, Bernie is winning right now because the Democratic party is a progressive party and progressive ideas are popular ideas," Warren began. She then added in no uncertain terms that "Bernie and I agree on a lot of things, but I think I would make a better president than Bernie."

Warren explained that "getting a progressive agenda enacted is going to be really hard and it's going to take someone who digs into the details to make it happen." She went on to site her record on battling big banks and health care, emphasizing that "I dug in. I did the work. And then Bernie's team trashed me for it."

As Sanders shook his head in disagreement, Warren finished: "Progressives have got one shot and we need to spend it with a leader who will get something done."



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