Ellen DeGeneres Sells $55 Million Montecito Estate, Buys Two More Homes

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Her eponymous talk show may be ending, but it doesn’t appear Ellen DeGeneres has any plans to slow her real estate roll. Two months ago, she paid $8.5 million for a carefully preserved midcentury modern home in Beverly Hills. And last month alone, records reveal DeGeneres and longtime wife Portia de Rossi completed three more multimillion-dollar real estate transfers, all of them in the couple’s home base of Montecito, Calif.

Though they’ve owned dozens of homes across Southern California, DeGeneres and de Rossi also quietly sold their priciest home ever, unloading their epic Cape Dutch-style estate for exactly $55 million. The off-market deal was first reported by Siteline Santa Barbara, and the buyer has not yet been identified, though it’s known that the transfer ranks as the second-biggest residential deal ever inked in Santa Barbara County, behind only the $63 million paid last year by billionaire Riley Bechtel. But the Bechtel purchase was for a much larger estate with 237 acres, while the DeGeneres property spans “only” 4.3 acres.

The Louisiana native, 63, and her Australian-American wife, 48, bought the Montecito property not even a year ago, paying $49 million for the place in late 2020. It’s not clear what changes the couple made in the months since, but the village-like compound was custom-built over several years and completed in 2012 by politically-conservative radio show host Dennis Miller and his wife, former model Slim Paley.

Behind walls and gates on one of Montecito’s most prestigious streets, the sprawling estate is comprised of five separate structures — a guesthouse, a detached garage building, a poolhouse, a barn designed by famed architect Tom Kundig, and a 9,000-square-foot mansion authentically designed in the South African Cape Dutch architectural style.

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