Emmys 2019: Kim Kardashian, Kendall Jenner laughed at for calling themselves 'real people' onstage: 'Savage'

Emmys 2019: Kim Kardashian, Kendall Jenner laughed at for calling themselves 'real people' onstage: 'Savage'

Kim Kardashian and Kendall Jenner's appearance at the 2019 Emmy Awards didn't exactly go according to plan.

The reality star sisters took the stage during the 71st annual ceremony on Sunday night to present the the award for Outstanding Competition Series to "RuPaul's Drag Race," and their introduction was slightly interrupted by an unplanned laughing fit from the audience.

Kim and Kendall walked out onto the stage to Sister Sledge's hit, "We Are Family," before the KKW Beauty founder started their introduction of the category.

"Our family knows first-hand how truly compelling television comes from real people just being themselves...." Kim said, alluding to her family's reality show, "Keeping Up With the Kardashians," which has documented the ins and outs of their lives for 17 seasons now.

It was then, though, that the star-studded audience burst into laughter, before Kendall had to say her part of the teleprompter copy.

"... Telling their stories unfiltered and unscripted," she said.

The moment seemingly gave the sisters pause, as they were unsure what the audience was laughing about, but Twitter was quick to pick up on the crowd's "savage" response.

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