Ethics brushed aside, Hunter Biden expected to schmooze with prospective art buyers

Ethics brushed aside, Hunter Biden expected to schmooze with prospective art buyers
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
·4 min read
In this article:
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

Hunter Biden is set to meet with prospective art buyers at two separate shows in the near future, raising more ethics concerns about the possible influence peddling through the 51-year-old son of President Joe Biden.

The younger Biden is expected at a small event in Los Angeles and a larger showing in New York City to present his creations, which Georges Berges Gallery estimates will fetch up to $500,000.

When asked if Hunter Biden would be present, a spokesperson for the gallery told CBS News, "Oh yes. With pleasure. He's looking forward to it. It is like someone debuting in the world. And of course, he will be there. "

The development creates a whole new ethics quandary as the gallery previously vowed to withhold transactional records from the exhibits, including the identities of bidders, final buyers, and the amounts paid for the artwork. The agreement would also keep buyers secret from the White House and the president.

ETHICS EXPERTS CONCERNED ABOUT HUNTER BIDEN'S ART SHOW

Hunter Biden will not discuss pricing or purchase details during either of the affairs, a source told CBS News, but questions remain.

"Is Hunter Biden going to walk around the art show with a blindfold on?" said Walter Shaub, former head of the Office of Government Ethics during President Barack Obama's administration. "It just goes to show you the focus isn't on government ethics. It's just showing the child of a president can cash in on the presidency."

Similar concerns were voiced earlier in the month even as the White House defended the handling of Hunter Biden's debut art show.

“The initial reaction a lot of people are going to have is that he’s capitalizing on being the son of a president and wants people to give him a lot of money,” said former Bush administration chief ethics lawyer Richard Painter, pointing to the art’s “awfully high prices.”

“The whole thing is a really bad idea,” Painter, who served under former President George W. Bush from 2005 to 2007, told the Washington Post.

The lack of transparency and the younger Biden’s own spotty background also cause concern.

“Because we don’t know who is paying for this art, and we don’t know for sure that [Hunter Biden] knows, we have no way of monitoring whether people are buying access to the White House,” Shaub said.

He added: “What these people are paying for is Hunter Biden’s last name.”

Art curator Jeffry Cudlin agreed, saying the face value of the art is worth relatively nothing due to its amateurish style.

“How much of that value is due to the art itself? That's easy: None of it,” Cudlin, a professor of art curatorial studies and practice at the Maryland Institute College of Art, told the Washington Examiner.

“They're fine decorative amateur work. Hey, everybody needs a hobby!” he said, suggesting the artwork should go for a more modest $850-$3,000.

The White House touted the handling of controversial first son Hunter Biden's debut art show.

“The president has established the highest ethical standards of any administration in American history, and his family’s commitment to rigorous processes like this is a prime example,” said Andrew Bates, the deputy White House press secretary, in a statement earlier this month.

CLICK HERE TO READ MORE FROM THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER

Hunter Biden, a lobbyist-investor better known for his $50,000-a-month role on the board of Ukrainian natural gas company Burisma Holdings and his struggles with alcohol and drug addiction, told the New York Times last year painting was "literally" keeping him sober and sane.

Former President Donald Trump targeted Hunter Biden for his business dealings and tabloid personal life during the 2020 campaign against his father.

Trump's interest in Biden's work with Burisma, given his lack of energy sector experience and the fact it was offered when his former vice president father was responsible for foreign policy in the region, was central to his first impeachment by House Democrats in 2019.

Biden's financial transactions in China are now suspected to be the basis of a federal investigation into his taxes. That investigation dates back to 2018 and involves allegations of money laundering, including a 2.8-carat diamond he was gifted by a Chinese tycoon.

Washington Examiner Videos

Tags: News, Hunter Biden, Joe Biden, Ethics, Arts, Art, Art Gallery, Biden Administration, White House

Original Author: Jake Dima

Original Location: Ethics brushed aside, Hunter Biden expected to schmooze with prospective art buyers

Our goal is to create a safe and engaging place for users to connect over interests and passions. In order to improve our community experience, we are temporarily suspending article commenting