Europe surpasses 250,000 coronavirus deaths

Europe became the second region after Latin America to surpass 250,000 reported deaths from COVID-19 on Saturday (October 24), according to a Reuters tally.

The region also reported at least 200,000 daily COVID-19 infections for the first time on Thursday.

Many Southern European countries this week reported their highest number of cases in a single day.

Europe now accounts for nearly 19% of global deaths.

The United Kingdom, Italy, France, Russia, Belgium and Spain account for nearly two-thirds of the registered deaths, with the UK leading Europe's death toll.

Meanwhile, Asia surpassed 10 million novel coronavirus infections on Saturday (October 24).

Behind only Latin America, Asia now accounts for about a quarter of the global caseload.

India is the worst affected in the region, with nearly 7.8 million infections.

The global coronavirus tally stands at about 42.1 million cases.

But experts say the true numbers of cases and deaths are likely much higher, given deficiencies in testing and potential underreporting in many countries.

Video Transcript

- Europe became the second region after Latin America to surpass 250,000 reported deaths from COVID-19 on Saturday, according to a Reuters tally. The region also reported at least 200,000 daily COVID-19 infections for the first time on Thursday.

Many southern European countries this week reported the highest number of cases in a single day. Europe now accounts for nearly 19% of global deaths. The United Kingdom, Italy, France, Russia, Belgium, and Spain account for nearly 2/3 of the registered deaths, with the UK leading Europe's death toll.

Meanwhile Asia surpassed 10 million novel coronavirus infections on Saturday, behind only Latin America. Asia now accounts for about a quarter of the global caseload. India is the worst affected in the region with nearly 7.8 million infections.

The global coronavirus tally stands at about 42.1 million cases, but experts say the true numbers of cases and deaths are likely much higher given deficiencies in testing and potential underreporting in many countries.