Even though Oklahoma didn't allow tattoo parlors until 2006, this community stuck together

·1 min read
Owners of 23rd Street Body Piercing and Atomic Lotus Tattoo, Jason and Tisha King pose for a photo outside their stores in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, May 17, 2022.
Owners of 23rd Street Body Piercing and Atomic Lotus Tattoo, Jason and Tisha King pose for a photo outside their stores in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, May 17, 2022.

Every day as I drive my daughter to gymnastics, I marvel at the long lines outside Atomic Lotus Tattoo and 23rd Street and Body Piercing.   People of all ages. Some with children. Many already covered with tattoos, some with none at all but waiting for a piercing.

Hi, I'm Ray Rivera, executive editor of The Oklahoman. Part of our job as journalists is not just to uncover corruption and protect democracy,  but to explore the everyday wonders around us. To answer the questions you're curious about. So it was with delight when I read Dana Branham's on how Jason and Tisha King's shops in Uptown became so popular, especially in a state that didn't allow tattoo parlors until 2006.

“In Oklahoma City, every punk rock kid knew every other punk rock kid. It was a thing,” Jason King, who founded the piercing studio in 1995, told Dana. “There were only 15 of us.”

Now, “we’re piercing children of our original clients, or even grandchildren of our original clients,” said Tisha King.

Whether you're a fan of tattoos and body piercings or not, the story is a joy to read.

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This article originally appeared on Oklahoman: Even though Oklahoma didn't allow tattoo parlors until 2006, this community came together