Facebook closes political ads loophole ahead of U.S. election

Facebook has said it will affix labels to political ads shared by users on their own feeds, closing what critics have said for years was a glaring loophole in the company's election transparency measures. Joe Davies reports.

  • Michael Cohen may have violated the terms of his prison release by eating out at a restaurant in Manhattan
    Business Insider

    Michael Cohen may have violated the terms of his prison release by eating out at a restaurant in Manhattan

    The New York Post obtained photos showing Michael Cohen eating out at a Manhattan restaurant Thursday night. Cohen is currently serving a three-year sentence under home confinement, and eating out appears to be a violation of the conditions of his release from a federal prison camp. Business Insider reached out to the Bureau of Prisons for comment but did not immediately receive a response Saturday morning.

  • The One Reason Donald Trump Needs to Fear Joe Biden (And Could Lose)
    The National Interest

    The One Reason Donald Trump Needs to Fear Joe Biden (And Could Lose)

    In the Real Clear Polling average, Biden leads Donald Trump by 10 points, and in many new swing state polls, the former vice president is ahead of the president, too. Biden is more popular personally than Trump. In the June 17-18 Harvard Center for American Politics/Harris online poll, 47 percent had a very favorable or favorable view of Biden, and 44 percent an unfavorable or very unfavorable view.

  • Judge blocks Portland police from using physical force against journalists
    The Independent

    Judge blocks Portland police from using physical force against journalists

    The order comes after the police arrested journalists who were covering a protest on Tuesday. One of them, Lesley McLam, was taken into custody. The restraining order declares that the police “are enjoined from arresting, threatening to arrest, or using physical force directed against any person whom they know or reasonably should know is a journalist or legal observer … unless the police have probable cause to believe that such individual has committed a crime”.

  • Florida's new coronavirus cases break record, nearly tying New York's peak
    NBC News

    Florida's new coronavirus cases break record, nearly tying New York's peak

    Florida shattered its single-day record for new coronavirus cases, nearly tying New York state's peak daily count set in April. Florida on Saturday reported 11,458 new cases of the virus, which breaks its previous records and approaches New York's highest daily tally of 11,571 in April, according to NBC Miami and the New York State Department of Health. New York's peak was the highest one-day tally in the nation so far, according to Marketwatch.

  • 'How the hell are we going to do this?' The panic over reopening schools
    Politico

    'How the hell are we going to do this?' The panic over reopening schools

    Yet the beginning of the school year is nearing and worried parents are wondering if they will be able to count on in-person classes resuming by the time they must return to work, inextricably tying school reopenings to the revival of the economy. In Virginia, Fairfax County's teachers unions say teachers aren't comfortable returning to schools and are encouraging members to state their preference for online learning until more information about face-to-face instruction is available. In Texas, the governor is now requiring face masks in public spaces in counties with 20 or more Covid-19 cases — but his order didn't mention schools.

  • Copenhagen's Little Mermaid labelled 'racist fish'
    Reuters

    Copenhagen's Little Mermaid labelled 'racist fish'

    Denmark woke up on Friday to the words "racist fish" scrawled across the base of the "Little Mermaid", the bronze statue honouring Hans Christian Andersen's famous fairy tale that perches on a rock in the sea off a pier in Copenhagen. "We consider it vandalism and have started an investigation," a spokesman for the Copenhagen police said. Protesters of the Black Lives Matter movement around the world have in recent months rallied against statues of historical figures who played a role in racist oppression, such as slave traders and colonialists.

  • India Kanpur: Eight policemen killed in clash with gang members
    BBC

    India Kanpur: Eight policemen killed in clash with gang members

    Eight Indian policemen have been killed, and seven more injured, in an encounter with gang members, reports say. The officers were fired upon during a raid in search of a notorious local gangster in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh. The gangster, Vikas Dubey, is accused in 60 criminal cases for various offences, including attempted murder.

  • For nearly 160 years, St. George has been known as Utah's 'Dixie.' The name is all over the city. Is it time to change?
    USA TODAY

    For nearly 160 years, St. George has been known as Utah's 'Dixie.' The name is all over the city. Is it time to change?

    It doesn't take long to notice a familiar pattern when it comes to one particular word in St. George, Utah. The word has been subject to much controversy in St. George over the years — and now the debate is back. In the wake of the death of George Floyd, which sparked a worldwide Black Lives Matter and protests against racial inequality and police brutality, there's been a renewed drive to abolish statues and symbols with ties to the Confederacy, white supremacy and historical racial violence.

  • Why U.S. F-35s, Stealth Bombers and Attack Drones Could Fail in a War
    The National Interest

    Why U.S. F-35s, Stealth Bombers and Attack Drones Could Fail in a War

    Fighter jets, stealth bombers, attack drones and air-traveling missiles all need to “operate at speed” in a fast-changing great power conflict era. When faced with fast, multi-frequency, long-range precision fire from enemy air defenses, air attackers simply must “operate at speed,” according to U.S. Air Forces, Europe Commander General Jeffrey Harrigian, who used the phrase in a discussion with The Mitchell Institute for Aerospace Studies. Harrigian, who is also now the Commander of U.S. Air Forces Africa, ran much of the air campaign during Operation Inherent Resolve against ISIS; he offered a first-hand war perspective in a conversation with retired Lieutenant General David Deptula, Dean of the Mitchell Institute.

  • White Mich. couple charged after gun pulled on Black family
    Associated Press

    White Mich. couple charged after gun pulled on Black family

    A white couple face criminal charges after one of them was captured on video pulling a handgun on a Black woman and her daughters in a restaurant parking lot in Michigan. Jillian Wuestenberg, 32, and Eric Wuestenberg, 42, were arrested after Wednesday night's confrontation and charged Thursday with felonious assault, Oakland County Prosecutor Jessica Cooper said in a release. As a condition of the bond they must turn over all firearms, not engage in “assaultive behavior” and not leave Michigan, Sheriff Michael Bouchard said in a statement.

  • Biden evokes MLK and George Floyd in Fourth of July message
    CBS News

    Biden evokes MLK and George Floyd in Fourth of July message

    Evoking the names of Martin Luther King and George Floyd, Joe Biden said Saturday that the U.S. "never lived up" to its founding principle that "all men are created equal." In the Fourth of July video message, Biden said that even though America had fallen short of equality, the effort to live up to the nation's founding ideals continues. It survived the ravages of the Civil War, the dogs of Bull Connor, the assassination of Martin Luther King, and more than 200 years of systemic racism.

  • Concern over coronavirus mars Trump's Mount Rushmore trip
    Yahoo News Video

    Concern over coronavirus mars Trump's Mount Rushmore trip

    President Trump will visit Mount Rushmore in South Dakota for a Fourth of July celebration, despite controversy about large crowd gatherings during the coronavirus pandemic.

  • 'A dereliction of duty': Former CIA director says Trump has gone 'Awol' in handling of coronavirus
    The Independent

    'A dereliction of duty': Former CIA director says Trump has gone 'Awol' in handling of coronavirus

    Donald Trump has gone “Awol” in his leadership of the US through the coronavirus pandemic, former CIA Director and Defence Secretary Leon Panetta has said in a scathing attack on the president. “This president has essentially gone Awol from the job of leadership that he should be providing a country in trouble,” Mr Panneta told CNN's Anderson Cooper on Wednesday, branding the situation a "major crisis". The former CIA director, who served under President Barack Obama and as White House chief of staff under President Bill Clinton, went on to signpost recent warnings from Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert, that the outbreak in the US is spiralling.

  • 5 Americans who flew by private jet to Italy were reportedly denied entry due to the EU ban on visitors from countries with high coronavirus infection rates
    Business Insider

    5 Americans who flew by private jet to Italy were reportedly denied entry due to the EU ban on visitors from countries with high coronavirus infection rates

    Five Americans who attempted to enter Italy after flying on a private jet to the island of Sardinia were rejected because of the EU's coronavirus restrictions. The travellers eventually flew out of the airport 14 hours after they first landed, CNN reported. Italy was once the worst-hit country but appears to have controlled its outbreak, while the US is still dealing with virus peaks.

  • WHO sees first results from COVID drug trials within two weeks
    Reuters

    WHO sees first results from COVID drug trials within two weeks

    The World Health Organization (WHO) should soon get results from clinical trials it is conducting of drugs that might be effective in treating COVID-19 patients, its Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said on Friday. "Nearly 5,500 patients in 39 countries have so far been recruited into the Solidarity trial," he told a news briefing, referring to clinical studies the U.N. agency is conducting. "We expect interim results within the next two weeks."

  • Locals remain anxious amid India-China border stand-off
    BBC

    Locals remain anxious amid India-China border stand-off

    In the weeks leading up to the clash, there were reports of scuffles between the two militaries over the Line of Actual Control (LAC), the poorly demarcated border between the two nuclear-armed powers. Deadly brawl Reports from May said that the Chinese forces put up tents, dug trenches and moved heavy equipment several kilometres inside what had been regarded by India as its territory. The move came after India built a road several hundred kilometres long connecting to a high-altitude forward air base which it reactivated in 2008.

  • Thomas Jefferson alongside Black great-grandson holds 'a mirror' to U.S.
    NBC News

    Thomas Jefferson alongside Black great-grandson holds 'a mirror' to U.S.

    Shannon LaNier, a sixth great-grandson of Founding Father Thomas Jefferson and his slave, Sally Hemings, wore the same sort of outfit as his famous ancestor for a Smithsonian Magazine piece, "American Descendants." “I didn't want to become Jefferson,” LaNier said. The Smithsonian article features pictures by British photographer Drew Gardner who about 15 years ago started tracking down descendants of famous Europeans such as Napoleon and Charles Dickens to see if they would "pose as their famous forebears in portraits he was recreating," the article said.

  • It Would Cost Trillions: The Day North Korea Collapses
    The National Interest

    It Would Cost Trillions: The Day North Korea Collapses

    The prospect of a peaceful Korean Unification, however remote it seems, would be a historical event worth planning for. Hoping for the best means there is a scenario where North Korea's collapse and regime change occur miraculously, opening doors to South Korea and the West to take over North Korea in what one hopes would be a peaceful absorption. In November 1989, West and East Berliners flocked to what was one of the most heavily guarded borders in the world and tore down parts of the Berlin Wall that had divided Germany for twenty-eight years.

  • There is no epidemic of fatal police shootings against unarmed Black Americans
    USA TODAY Opinion

    There is no epidemic of fatal police shootings against unarmed Black Americans

    The video of George Floyd's tragic death under the knee of a Minneapolis police officer has led many to ask whether it represents the tip of an iceberg of police brutality. For centuries, United States law enforcement was interwoven with slavery and segregation, and that memory cannot be easily erased. Much of modern policing is driven by crime data and community demands for help.

  • Trudeau: Canada to restrict sensitive exports, suspend extraditions to Hong Kong
    Politico

    Trudeau: Canada to restrict sensitive exports, suspend extraditions to Hong Kong

    Prime Minister Justin Trudeau says in response to “grave concern” over China's new national security law for Hong Kong the Canadian government is restricting the export of sensitive goods to the territory and suspending its extradition treaty. His announcement Friday followed mainland China's move this week to impose national security legislation that has drawn international condemnation for threatening Hong Kong's autonomy. We are extremely concerned about the situation in Hong Kong,” Trudeau told a press conference near Ottawa.

  • Huge bird of prey catches shark-like fish and flies off in viral video
    The Independent

    Huge bird of prey catches shark-like fish and flies off in viral video

    Visitors to a beach last week would have seen a shark-like fish soaring above their heads thanks to one bird's actions. A video shared online showed one huge predatory bird seen with what appeared to be a shark suspended in its claws above crowds at South Carolina's Myrtle Beach. The woman who witnessed the stunt, Kelly Burbage, shared the video online on Friday where she appealed for wildlife experts to name the fish and the bird.

  • Trump targets 'Marxists' in July 4th speech, boasts of coronavirus response despite record case numbers
    USA TODAY

    Trump targets 'Marxists' in July 4th speech, boasts of coronavirus response despite record case numbers

    Despite warnings by public health officials about the spread of COVID-19, President Donald Trump hosted a July 4th party Saturday in which he assailed "angry mobs" who oppose him and defended his administration's coronavirus response despite record high case numbers. "We are now in the process of defeating the radical left, the Marxists, the anarchists, the agitators, the looters, and people who in many instances have absolutely no clue what they are doing," Trump said during a "Salute to America" event at the White House. As for the virus, Trump claimed progress is being made – "we've learned how to put out the flame" – even though new U.S. cases are on a record pace, including more than 50,000 in the last three days.

  • Texas Gov. Moves to Stop COVID-19 but It’s Already Out of Control
    The Daily Beast

    Texas Gov. Moves to Stop COVID-19 but It’s Already Out of Control

    Democratic officials angry at Texas Gov. Greg Abbott's handling of surging coronavirus numbers in the state this week had one lackluster place to voice their frustrations about the rapidly escalating public health crisis killing their constituents: a Zoom press conference. “While some states followed the advice of public health experts, Texas did not,” Dallas-area State Rep. Toni Rose said from a webcam on Wednesday, a photograph of the Texas Capitol superimposed behind her. It was certainly not the first time Democrats in the state had inveighed against a pandemic approach criticized by some as too reckless, and followed months of power struggles between local and state leaders in Texas over lockdowns, masks, and more.

  • Dozens mourn man who killed himself in busy Beirut district
    Reuters

    Dozens mourn man who killed himself in busy Beirut district

    Dozens of people lay flowers on a main Beirut street where a man killed himself on Friday, with some blaming his death on the country's economic collapse that has left more and more Lebanese hungry. Reuters could not establish the motive for the apparent suicide. The 61-year-old man shot himself in the head in front of a Dunkin' Donuts store in the capital's busy Hamra district, witnesses said.

  • NYC shootings: No end in sight to dramatic rise in gun violence
    WABC – NY

    NYC shootings: No end in sight to dramatic rise in gun violence

    In all, 10 shootings occurred on Thursday, involving 14 victims.