• Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

Facebook suspends former President Trump until 2023

  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.
  • Oops!
    Something went wrong.
    Please try again later.

Facebook announced former President Trump will be suspended from the social media platform for two years, after finding that his posts on January 6 stoked violence and posed a risk to public safety. Nancy Cordes has the details.

Video Transcript

[MUSIC PLAYING]

NORAH O'DONNELL: Good evening, and thank you for joining us on this busy Friday. We're going to begin tonight with that bombshell move by the world's largest social media platform suspending former President Trump for two years. Nearly $3 billion people use Facebook each month but in a statement tonight the company says the 45th president won't be one of them until at least January of 2023, punishment for posts he made during the January 6 insurrection at the Capitol.

The decision to keep Mr Trump off of Facebook as well as Instagram has major implications ahead of next year's midterm elections as well as on Mr Trump's plans to run for re-election in 2024 in part because social media has been a vital source of political fundraising. Now, this suspension comes five months after the attack on the Capitol. And tonight CBS News has learned the Department of Justice is still looking for 250 people it says assaulted police or committed violence on that day.

CBS's Nikole Killion is on Capitol Hill for us tonight. Before CBS's Nancy Cordes is going to lead off our coverage with that stunning announcement by Facebook. Good evening, Nancy.

NANCY CORDES: Good evening, Norah. And tonight those January posts from President Trump have prompted Facebook to come up with entirely new rules for public figures who stoke or embrace violence. And Mr Trump got the maximum penalty. If former President Trump had a Facebook status tonight it would read suspended until January 23. If Mr Trump commits further violations in future Facebook said he could be subject to permanent removal of his pages and accounts.

JEN PSAKI: It feels pretty unlikely that the zebra is going to change his stripes over the next two years. We'll see.

NANCY CORDES: It was this pair of falsehood ridden posts that got Mr Trump thrown off Facebook in January.

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: We love you, you're very special--

NANCY CORDES: In them hailed rioters as great patriots even as they stormed the Capitol leaving five dead.

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: We had an election that was stolen from us.

NANCY CORDES: Nick Clegg is Facebook's Vice President.

NICK CLEGG: What he was--

NANCY CORDES: Why did you decide that two years was the proper amount of time to keep Mr Trump off of the platform?

NICK CLEGG: We're always trying to strike a balance here with trying to make sure that the penalty is long enough to reflect the gravity of the violation that occurred in January, that it acts as a deterrent, and that it's also proportionate.

NANCY CORDES: Facebook initially imposed an indefinite suspension. Twitter banned him altogether. But last month a Facebook advisory board called on the company to issue clearer rules. So today Facebook unveiled its heightened penalties for public figures during times of civil unrest and ongoing violence. The suspensions range from one month to Mr Trump's two years.

NICK CLEGG: And whether you're the pope or the queen or the President of the United States we apply to everybody is you cannot use our services to say things which we think deliberately can lead to harm.

NANCY CORDES: Republicans quickly accused the tech giant of censorship. And Mr Trump issued a one line rebuke of Facebook's founder, "Next time I'm in the White House," he vowed, "There will be no more dinners at his request with Mark Zuckerberg and his wife. It will be all business." Today's decision means that Mr Trump will no longer be able to raise money for himself or for other Republicans on Facebook until after the 2022 midterm elections, though, he could be reinstated in time for a presidential bid in 2020 Norah.

NORAH O'DONNELL: All right, Nancy Cordes, thank you.