Facing several legal issues, Rudy Giuliani has reportedly laid off members of his entourage

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Rudy Giuliani's legal troubles are mounting at the same time his entourage is shrinking.

Over the last few weeks, Giuliani, former President Donald Trump's ex-personal lawyer, has laid off multiple staffers and independent contractors who worked for him, three people familiar with the matter told Politico, telling them he had to let them go as a cost-cutting measure. Giuliani had been known to go around New York with an entourage of up to five people, but those days are over — at least for now, Politico reports.

Giuliani left an international law firm in 2018 to work for Trump, and it's been reported that Trump never paid Giuliani for his services; during 2019 divorce proceedings, Giuliani's ex-wife's attorney said it actually cost Giuliani money to work for Trump, because he had to cover all of his own expenses when he went to Washington. It also came out during the hearing that Giuliani is a big spender, dropping $50,000 on a private jet subscription service, $12,000 on cigars, and $40,000 on dental work for a girlfriend's son.

Last week, federal investigators raided Giuliani's Manhattan home and office, as part of a probe into whether Giuliani lobbied the Trump administration on behalf of Ukrainian officials, and he's also being sued by voting machine companies over his false claims that they were part of an effort to rig the 2020 presidential election.

Some of Giuliani's relatives and associates have made public pleas for Trump to throw his former lawyer a bone, including Giuliani's son, Andrew. "I think all those Americans that donated [to Trump] after Nov. 3, they were donating for the legal defense fund," Andrew told ABC News on Sunday. "My father ran the legal team at that point. So I think it's very easy to make a strong case for the fact that he and all the lawyers that worked on there should be indemnified. I would find it highly irregular if the president's lead counsel did not get indemnified."

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