Fact check: Fake anti-Christmas quote attributed to Kamala Harris began as satire

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The claim: Kamala Harris said Christmas should not be a federal holiday

On Dec. 11, President Donald Trump issued an executive order to designate Dec. 24, 2020 — Christmas Eve — as a federal holiday, per the White House. Trump has issued similar orders in previous years, per USA TODAY.

Dec. 25 — Christmas Day — is already a federal holiday.

Recently, a few users took to Facebook to post a quote on the subject of Christmas that they claim came from Vice President-elect Kamala Harris.

“Why is Christmas held above Hamnukah or Kwanzaa? It’s a long-standing grievous error to allow Christians some kind of festival of superiority that’s forcibly pushed down the throats of others. This is not a Christian nation," the quote reads, misspelling Hanukkah.

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Along with the quote, a user added a caption that said, "Well, y'all voted for this, so, I don't want to hear nothing! She is shameful!!!"

The quote originated on America's Last Line of Defense, a website that published a Nov. 21 article headlined "Kamala: ‘Christmas Shouldn’t Be A Federal Holiday.'" It contained the quote that was posted to Facebook.

It also claimed that Harris believes "that keeping the celebration of Christ’s birth as an official federally observed date is tantamount to a violation of separation of church and state," and contained the allegation that "Harris was born of satanic demons and raised in a household dominated by Scientology."

The user who posted the quote to Facebookhas not responded to requests from USA TODAY for comment.

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A satirical website

America's Last Line of Defense is a satirical publication that publishes fictitious articles, per its website.

"Everything on this website is fiction. It is not a lie and it is not fake news because it is not real. If you believe that it is real, you should have your head examined," the website reads. "Any similarities between this site’s pure fantasy and actual people, places, and events are purely coincidental and all images should be considered altered and satirical."

The story about Harris was filed under the section "Silly Tater Satire."

Christopher Blair, the creator of America's Last Line of Defense, told USA TODAY that its articles have "zero in common with reality."

"We follow one specific rule, and that is that the piece has to be ridiculous," he wrote in an emailed statement.

Vice President-elect Kamala Harris celebrates both Christmas and Hanukkah.
Vice President-elect Kamala Harris celebrates both Christmas and Hanukkah.

Harris identifies as Baptist, celebrates both Christmas and Hanukkah

This is not the first time posts on Facebook have falsely attributed anti-Christian quotes to Harris. In October, some users baselessly claimed she called churches "propaganda centers," per USA TODAY.

In truth, Harris identifies as a Baptist — a denomination of Christianity — and attends services at the Third Baptist Church of San Francisco, per USA TODAY.

Her father was a Christian and her mother was Hindu. Growing up, Harris attended services at both a Black Baptist church and a Hindu temple.

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Her husband, Doug Emhoff, is Jewish.

As a result, Harris celebrates both Christmas and Hanukkah.

On Dec. 10, Harris and Emhoff took to Twitter to mark the start of Hanukkah. In a video message, Emhoff said Hanukkah is "one of our favorite holidays in our big modern family."

"I love Hanukkah because it really is about the light, and bringing light where there has been darkness," Harris said. "And there is so much work to be done in the world to bring light."

Harris has also posted about Christmas in the past.

"There is no greater gift than time with family, friends, and loved ones. Wishing you and yours a Merry Christmas," she wrote on Twitter in 2019, along with a picture of herself and Emhoff.

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Our rating: False

Based on our research, the claim that Kamala Harris said Christmas should not be a federal holiday is FALSE. The quote attributed to her on the subject originated on America's Last Line of Defense, a satirical website that notes its content is "fiction" and "not real." Harris identifies as Baptist and celebrates both Christmas and Hanukkah with her husband, Doug Emhoff, who is Jewish.

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This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Fact check: Anti-Christmas quote attributed to Kamala Harris is satire

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