• Trump declares himself 'chief law enforcement officer' as he issues numerous pardons
    Yahoo News

    Trump declares himself 'chief law enforcement officer' as he issues numerous pardons

    President Trump on Tuesday exercised his pardon power, granting clemency to or commuting the sentences of nearly a dozen people convicted of crimes, including former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich and junk bond pioneer Michael Milken. Trump also referred to himself as the nation's “chief law enforcement officer,” a title typically reserved for the attorney general. On Tuesday morning, the White House announced Trump's pardoning of former San Francisco 49ers owner Edward DeBartolo Jr. for his involvement in a 1998 corruption case against former Louisiana Gov. Edwin Edwards.

  • What prior debates reveal about Bloomberg under pressure
    Yahoo News

    What prior debates reveal about Bloomberg under pressure

    At this point in the Democratic presidential primary, most Americans have probably seen a Mike Bloomberg ad on TV. “Seeing him up close, he could suffer from a little '[Joe] Biden syndrome,'” New York-based political consultant Neal Kwatra, who is unaffiliated in the Democratic presidential primary, recently told Politico. While Wednesday's Democratic gathering in Las Vegas may be Bloomberg's presidential debate debut (he qualified Tuesday after cracking double digits in four national polls), he has debated before.

  • Missing 6-year-old South Carolina girl's death ruled homicide by asphyxiation
    NBC News

    Missing 6-year-old South Carolina girl's death ruled homicide by asphyxiation

    A child's polka dot boot and a soup ladle with fresh dirt on it led police to the body of a 6-year-old kidnapping and homicide victim, South Carolina police said Tuesday. First grader Faye Marie Swetlik, who was found last week near her home in Cayce, a suburb of Columbia, died by asphyxiation at the hands of a neighbor, officials revealed. "Faye Swetlik's death did not occur at the location where her body was discovered," Lexington County Coroner Margaret Fisher told reporters.

  • Maduro accused of "disappearing" US oilmen as trial delayed
    Associated Press

    Maduro accused of "disappearing" US oilmen as trial delayed

    Family members of six American oil executives jailed in Venezuela are accusing Nicolas Maduro's government of “forced disappearance” after the men were inexplicably missing for the scheduled start of their trial on Wednesday. Veronica Vadell said that lawyers for her father, Tomeu Vadell, and the five other executives from Houston-based Citgo had been waiting at a Caracas courthouse for more than six hours for the men to be transferred by the nation's intelligence police. The arrest took place the same day opposition leader Juan Guaidó met with President Donald Trump at the White House, fueling speculation the detention was politically motivated.

  • 2 socialites have reportedly died after their Mercedes fell off a ferry leaving the most expensive ZIP code in the United States
    Business Insider

    2 socialites have reportedly died after their Mercedes fell off a ferry leaving the most expensive ZIP code in the United States

    Fisher Island, a private, man-made island off the coast of Miami, is known for being the richest ZIP code in the US, where the average income of residents is $2.2 million and the median home value is roughly $2.9 million. Police recovered and identified the bodies as socialites Emma Afra and Viviane Brahms, according to The Miami Herald. A blue Mercedes-Benz inexplicably rolled off the Fisher Island Ferry on Tuesday at around 5 p.m., killing the two women sitting in the car, according to The Miami Herald.

  • Andrew Yang is headed to CNN
    The Week

    Andrew Yang is headed to CNN

    Andrew Yang's presidential bid failed, but it did land him a gig with CNN. The entrepreneur who made a run at the Oval Office before dropping out last week after a poor showing at the New Hampshire primary will be joining the network as a political analyst. He's doing so just in time for Wednesday night's Democratic debate in Las Vegas, as the remaining candidates take the stage before the Nevada caucuses Saturday.

  • What happened in Vegas? Who won, who lost and takeaways from the Democratic debate
    Politico

    What happened in Vegas? Who won, who lost and takeaways from the Democratic debate

    It took less than five minutes for Elizabeth Warren to set the tone for Wednesday's debate. Warren critiqued every other candidate's health care plan in a single answer, injecting a rush of new energy into her campaign. Pete Buttigieg and Amy Klobuchar continued a running battle that has built over several debates, while Biden lit into Bloomberg over Obamacare and Sanders faced questions about his policy disagreements with a powerful Nevada labor union.

  • Hate crimes go unchecked at Syracuse University, students say
    USA TODAY

    Hate crimes go unchecked at Syracuse University, students say

    A student activist group that took over a Syracuse University administration building to protest long-simmering charges of racism and bias on campus rejected an attempt by the school to end its three-day sit-in, the school said in a statement Wednesday. The black-led movement #NotAgainSU launched the sit-in at Crouse-Hinds Hall with more than 20 students Monday to protest the administration's handling of racial incidents at the university. The university's Department of Public Safety sealed off the building and hasn't allowed in food or medicine since Tuesday, according to The Daily Orange, the university's independent newspaper.

  • Russia raises eyebrows with blanket ban on Chinese visitors
    AFP

    Russia raises eyebrows with blanket ban on Chinese visitors

    Moscow is to impose a blanket ban on Chinese visitors over coronavirus fears in a move that will hit its tourism industry as experts question the need for such "draconian" measures. Moscow will ban all Chinese citizens from entering its territory from Thursday. It has already halted visa-free tourism for Chinese nationals and stopped issuing them with work visas and suspended rail links and restricted air travel.

  • 'We don't have a history of murdering our citizens': A Saudi official says reports that the Saudi Crown Prince is connected to the death of Jamal Khashoggi are 'ridiculous'
    INSIDER

    'We don't have a history of murdering our citizens': A Saudi official says reports that the Saudi Crown Prince is connected to the death of Jamal Khashoggi are 'ridiculous'

    Majed Jaber/Reuters Saudi Arabia's Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Adel al-Jubeir told Deutsche Welle, a German state-owned broadcasting company, that reports of Jamal Khashoggi's assassination being "authorized" by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman are "ridiculous." "If Saudi Arabia was so bad, nobody would come," Al-Jubeir said of foreign investors flocking to the Kingdom. The 59-year-old Washington Post journalist, who was frequently critical of the Saudi government, was killed in October 2018 upon entering the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul to obtain the documents necessary to marry his Turkish fiancée.

  • Group of more than 1,000 judges calls emergency meeting amid Trump concerns
    The Guardian

    Group of more than 1,000 judges calls emergency meeting amid Trump concerns

    A national association of federal judges has called an emergency meeting to address growing concerns about the intervention of Donald Trump and justice department officials in politically sensitive cases, according to US media reports. Cynthia Rufe, a Philadelphia US district judge who heads the independent Federal Judges Association, which has more than 1,100 members, told USA Today the group “could not wait” until its spring conference to discuss the matter. The meeting comes after more than 2,000 former US justice department officials, including some of the top government lawyers in the country, called on the attorney general, William Barr, to resign in the wake of the Roger Stone scandal.

  • Report: Obama reportedly expects he'll have to play a 'prominent role' in uniting Democrats this summer
    Yahoo News Video

    Report: Obama reportedly expects he'll have to play a 'prominent role' in uniting Democrats this summer

    The New York Magazine reports former president Barack Obama's radio silence on the 2020 Democratic primary is part of a "choreographed strategy" on the part of Obama, who is "increasingly sure he will need to play a prominent role in bringing the party back together and calming its tensions later this summer."

  • Coronavirus may be detectable before symptoms start
    NBC News

    Coronavirus may be detectable before symptoms start

    Tests can detect the new coronavirus in people before they show symptoms, though it's still unclear whether a person can spread it to others at this point, while they are asymptomatic, a study published Tuesday says. The new report in the New England Journal of Medicine looked at 126 people from Germany who were quarantined after being evacuated from Hubei province, the center of the coronavirus outbreak in China. "We discovered that shedding of potentially infectious virus may occur in persons who have no fever and no signs or only minor signs of infection," the authors wrote.

  • Mom, daughter plead not guilty to slaying 5 close relatives
    Associated Press

    Mom, daughter plead not guilty to slaying 5 close relatives

    A mother and her adult daughter pleaded not guilty Tuesday to killing five of their close relatives, including three children, at an apartment outside Philadelphia. Forty-six-year-old Shana Decree and her 20-year-old daughter Dominique Decree sat side by side in court in suburban Bucks County and affirmed their pleas to charges of first-degree murder and conspiracy. The pair barely spoke, except to respond to the judge's questions about the charges and their pleas.

  • 2 people from the Diamond Princess cruise ship have died from the coronavirus
    Business Insider

    2 people from the Diamond Princess cruise ship have died from the coronavirus

    Two passengers who were aboard the Diamond Princess during the coronavirus quarantine have died from the disease, a Japanese health ministry official said Thursday. The passengers — an 87-year-old man and an 84-year-old woman — were both Japanese nationals. The cruise ship, which is docked in Yokohama, Japan, was subject to a two-week quarantine imposed the Japanese government, which drew criticism from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) after more than 600 people were infected with the coronavirus.

  • The Democrats gave Mike Bloomberg what he deserved
    The Week

    The Democrats gave Mike Bloomberg what he deserved

    The most riveting moment of any Democratic debate so far came almost immediately, when Warren nailed Bloomberg on his appalling record of sexual harassment, racism, and plutocratic corruption: I'd like to talk about who we're running against — a billionaire who calls women 'fat broads' and 'horse-faced lesbians. And no, I'm not talking about Donald Trump, I'm talking about Mayor Bloomberg. Democrats are not going to win if we have a nominee who has a history of hiding his tax returns, of harassing women, and of supporting racist policies like redlining and stop-and-frisk … Democrats take a huge risk if we just substitute one arrogant billionaire for another.

  • 9 Rural Farms of the 21st Century Featuring Stunning Modern Design
    Architectural Digest

    9 Rural Farms of the 21st Century Featuring Stunning Modern Design

    From Italy to Tasmania, a new book covers those farms with an eye on both sustainability and beautiful design Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • Reuters

    China warns of further action after revoking WSJ journalists' credentials

    China warned on Thursday that it might take more action against the Wall Street Journal, a day after revoking the press credentials of three of the U.S. newspaper's correspondents over a column that China said was racist. The warning came after U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo condemned the decision to expel the journalists and defended freedom of speech. "We reserve the right to take further action," foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told reporters.

  • Secession in the Pacific Northwest? Some Oregon residents petition to join Idaho
    USA TODAY

    Secession in the Pacific Northwest? Some Oregon residents petition to join Idaho

    Frustrated by liberal policies, some Oregon residents petitioned to leave the state – by moving the border with Idaho westward. The movement secured initial approval from two counties and aims to get enough signatures to put the proposal on ballots in November, according to the group called Greater Idaho. If the group succeeds, voters in southeast Oregon may see a question on whether their county should become part of Idaho by redrawing the border.

  • Virginia lawmakers reject assault weapons ban over fears of potential civil war
    Yahoo News Video

    Virginia lawmakers reject assault weapons ban over fears of potential civil war

    Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam's push to ban the sale of assault weapons has failed after members of his own party balked at the proposal. Senators voted to shelve the bill for the year and ask the state crime commission to study the issue, an outcome that drew cheers from a committee room packed with gun advocates.

  • 26 of the Best Stainless-Steel Bathroom Faucets 
    Architectural Digest

    26 of the Best Stainless-Steel Bathroom Faucets 

    Take a shine to these faucets Originally Appeared on Architectural Digest

  • Iran Jails Climate Activists for Cooperation With U.S.
    Bloomberg

    Iran Jails Climate Activists for Cooperation With U.S.

    Iran sentenced eight environmentalists to prison terms of between four and 10 years for spying for and collaborating with the U.S., the spokesman for the country's judiciary said on Tuesday. The sentences are final, Gholam Hossein Esmaili told reporters at a televised news conference. The eight people were arrested in January and February 2018 and several of them are dual citizens of the U.S. and the U.K. Esmaili also said that Iran and Germany had completed a prisoner exchange, semi-official Fars news reported.

  • Former South Korean president jailed after losing appeal
    AFP

    Former South Korean president jailed after losing appeal

    Former South Korean president Lee Myung-bak was taken to prison Wednesday to begin a 17-year term for bribery and embezzlement after losing an appeal against a lighter sentence. Lee, in office from 2008 to 2013, was briefly jailed in 2018 after being sentenced to 15 years and fined 13 billion won ($11 million), but was granted bail while he appealed. He was found guilty of creating slush funds of tens of millions of dollars and accepting bribes from Samsung Electronics in return for a presidential pardon for its chairman, Lee Kun-hee, who was jailed for tax evasion.

  • Pope tenderly kissed on forehead by man in front-row seat
    Associated Press

    Pope tenderly kissed on forehead by man in front-row seat

    Well-wishers at Pope Francis' weekly audience have thrust soccer T-shirts, flowers and many a wailing baby into his arms. On Wednesday, Francis seemed to thoroughly enjoy a surprise expression of affection: a long, tender kiss planted on his forehead by a man in one of the front-row seats reserved for ailing or disabled people at the end of his audience. Francis appeared to be smiling when the man, who stood up when the pontiff approached to greet him and others in the front row, pulled the pope's head toward him and gave a kiss lasting several seconds, pressing his nose against Francis' forehead in the process.

  • ICE says it plans to destroy a trove of detention records, including numbers on detainee deaths and sexual assaults
    INSIDER

    ICE says it plans to destroy a trove of detention records, including numbers on detainee deaths and sexual assaults

    Customs & Border Protection Agency/Reuters The National Archives and Records Administration approved ICE's request to destroy years of detention records last year. The records included in the trove contain information related to deaths of detainees and allegations of sexual assault and abuse of detainees in December. On Tuesday, the ACLU filed Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests to retrieve the documents before they are erased.