Fleetwood Mac's Christine McVie dies at 79

Christine McVie, longtime singer/songwriter and keyboardist with Fleetwood Mac, died Nov. 30, the band and McVie's representatives wrote on social media. She was 79.

"On behalf of Christine McVie’s family, it is with a heavy heart we are informing you of Christine’s death," the statement posted on McVie's Facebook page read. "She passed away peacefully at hospital this morning, Wednesday, November 30th 2022, following a short illness. She was in the company of her family. We kindly ask that you respect the family’s privacy at this extremely painful time, and we would like everyone to keep Christine in their hearts and remember the life of an incredible human being, and revered musician who was loved universally. RIP Christine McVie."

“On behalf of Christine McVie’s family, it is with a heavy heart we are informing you of Christine’s death. She passed...

Posted by Christine McVie on Wednesday, November 30, 2022

Fleetwood Mac posted on its own Facebook page, "There are no words to describe our sadness at the passing of Christine McVie. She was truly one-of-a-kind, special and talented beyond measure. She was the best musician anyone could have in their band and the best friend anyone could have in their life. We were so lucky to have a life with her. Individually and together, we cherished Christine deeply and are thankful for the amazing memories we have. She will be so very missed."

Born in England on July 12, 1943, as Christine Perfect, McVie began charting in the 1960s with acts like Chicken Shack, adding vocals to the U.K. hit “I’d Rather Go Blind.” She wed Fleetwood Mac bassist John McVie in 1968 and changed her name, then began appearing on their albums, starting with 1968’s “Mr. Wonderful.” She became a full-time band member in the early 1970s.

Over the years, the band took in and released several band members. McVie’s clear, smooth voice helped the band hit the charts in the U.S. with its 1975 self-titled album, singing on “Over My Head” and “Say You Love Me.”

Fleetwood Mac (GAB Archive / Redferns)
Fleetwood Mac (GAB Archive / Redferns)

Eventually, the lineup coalesced around the McVies, Mick Fleetwood, Lindsey Buckingham and Stevie Nicks. In 1977, Fleetwood Mac’s “Rumours” became a sales juggernaut, in part for songs (often sung by Christine) like “Don’t Stop” and “You Make Loving Fun.” But the soap opera behind the scenes among the band members (both Buckingham and Nicks and the McVies saw their relationships fizzle during the recording) also contributed to public interest.

Eventually, “Rumours” won album of the year at the Grammys in 1978, and has since been certified 20-times platinum.

McVie went on to write and sing many of the band’s later hits, including “Think About Me,” “Hold Me” and “Little Lies,” which was co-written with her second husband, Eddy Quintela (they divorced in 2003).

Fleetwood Mac Performs On NBC's
Fleetwood Mac Performs On NBC's

In the 1990s, she backed away from touring and then the band, but in 2014 she rejoined the band in the studio and on tour, along with Buckingham and Nicks. In 2017 she released an album, “Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie.”

In 1998, she, her ex-husband and the other Mac band members were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

Fans and fellow musicians have begun posting tributes to McVie on social media. Marc Maron wrote, "Christine McVie died. One of the greatest rock voices ever. Both as a singer and songwriter. RIP."

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The band Garbage wrote, "Gutted to learn about the passing of Christine McVie. Just gutted. Songbird forever."

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And Ron Sexsmith added, "Just heard the terribly heartbreaking news that Christine McVie has died. She wrote my favourite Fleetwood Mac songs and I also loved her solo work. Enormous loss. RIP RS."

This article was originally published on TODAY.com