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Flu activity ‘historically low' in the US

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As COVID-19 dominates headlines, influenza has all but disappeared.

Video Transcript

MONICA DANIELLE: While the flu season is far from over, during a typical year, cases would likely be peaking in February. Not this year.

LYNNETTE BRAMMER: We haven't picked up any outbreaks of influenza or anything, really. It's just historically low.

MONICA DANIELLE: Lynnette Brammer is the lead of the CDC's domestic influenza surveillance team, which tracks the flu each year.

LYNNETTE BRAMMER: We're looking very hard for flu. We're just not finding it. And given the current situation, that's a very good thing because the hospitals have really been overwhelmed in a lot of places. You really don't want to add flu on top of that.

MONICA DANIELLE: Here, the CDC compares the past several years. And flu is almost nonexistent this year.

BRIAN LEWIS: Flu has just been fully interrupted by people wearing masks, staying home, the reduced number of children in schools, et cetera. And I think a lot of people also got the flu vaccine, as well. And so, all of those forces combined have really stopped the flu in its tracks.

MONICA DANIELLE: While the flu has seemingly been defeated this year, experts warn that doesn't mean we can stop being extremely vigilant.

BRIAN LEWIS: The grounds are ripe for transmission. And so, everything we can do to keep both flu and COVID at bay is going to benefit everyone's health.

MONICA DANIELLE: For AccuWeather, I'm Monica Danielle.