As future of abortions rights hang in balance, it's Election Day

·3 min read
Voters wait in line at Saint John Lutheran Church in Dublin, Ohio, to cast their ballots on election day, Nov. 3, 2020.
Voters wait in line at Saint John Lutheran Church in Dublin, Ohio, to cast their ballots on election day, Nov. 3, 2020.

Before we get to the debate surrounding how abortion is being discussed in Ohio, Happy Election Day.

It is the last day Ohioans can cast ballots in this primary, but due to the flaming hot mess surrounding the redistricting process, it will not be the last primary before the general election.

More: 'There have been a lot of questions' about Tuesday's primary election |Columbus Conversations

I partnered with members of the USA TODAY Ohio Bureau for a special installment in our Columbus Conversation series designed to prepare voters for today's election.

Reporter Jessie Balmert broke down the redistricting saga and explained how it will and will not impact today's elections.

Our colleague Haley BeMiller dove into the twists and turns involved in the race to replace U.S. Senator Rob. Portman.

U.S. Sen. Rob Portman
U.S. Sen. Rob Portman

USA TODAY Ohio Bureau Chief Anthony Shoemaker offered predictions on the governor's race.

Speaking of that all important race.

Ahead of the May 3 primary, all major candidates for Ohio governor were invited to sit down with the Columbus Dispatch editorial board and other journalists from our newsroom and the USA TODAY Ohio Bureau.

Mary Dillon a pro choice protester argues with anti abortion protester Evangeline Dunn of Columbus at A Stop The Bans protest at the Riffe Center May 21, 2019.[Eric Albrecht/Dispatch]
Mary Dillon a pro choice protester argues with anti abortion protester Evangeline Dunn of Columbus at A Stop The Bans protest at the Riffe Center May 21, 2019.[Eric Albrecht/Dispatch]

Businessman Jim Renacci, a Republican, and Democratic primary candidates Nan Whaley, the former mayor of Dayton, and John Cranley, the former mayor of Cincinnati, agreed to share their thoughts during hour-long interviews.

Mike DeWine, a Republican and the incumbent, declined repeated requests to meet with us. Farmer and business owner Joe Blystone, also a Republican, did not respond to multiple requests for an interview.

The May 1 2022 cover of the Columbus Dispatch's Conversation section
The May 1 2022 cover of the Columbus Dispatch's Conversation section

As part of Sunday Conversation, we presented questions to Cranley, Renacci and Whaley that are on our readers' minds.

The trio did not have kind things to say about DeWine.

>>> Gov. candidate Nan Whaley: Mike DeWine 'terrified' of Ohio extremists, losing power

>>>Governor candidate Renacci: Ohio a failing state that young people don't want to live in

>>>Gov. candidate John Cranley: Under Dewine, Ohio's middle class shrinking, young unwelcomed

Is seriousness of rape being downplayed?

Reports swirled Monday night that the United States Supreme Court majority may overturn Roe v. Wade.

Ohio Rep. Jean Schmidt of Loveland has been drawing her own headlines for comments about abortion.

Schmidt, who recently won praise and felt backlash for introducing House Bill 616, sparked outrage and gained national attention after saying during an abortion bill hearing that a "hypothetical teenager traumatized by rape would have the 'opportunity' to help that child become a 'productive human being.'

Columbus resident Al Debelak wrote: "In my imagination, I wonder what trauma has taken place in the life of a person who could say out loud that a woman who becomes pregnant by a rapist needs to see that vulgar and violent act against her personhood as "an opportunity."

No, my imagination cannot go there. It is too vile and vicious of an image to let it sit in my consciousness.

Yet Schmidt seems to have boldly let us see her lack of empathy, humanity, and sensibility as she continues to rage about women of substance and character and responsibility who make heartfelt decisions about their own bodies and future."

Reader Stephen Wiener says Schmidt's comments follow a stunning trend of lawmakers around the country dismissing the trauma and pain caused by rape.

"In Michigan a candidate for the state legislature recently said that he instructs his daughters "if rape is inevitable, you should just lie back and enjoy it."

These statements and this legislation show an absolute ignorance of what the crime of rape is. Rape is a violent attack on a person using sex as a vehicle.

There is nothing to enjoy."

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Thanks for reading,

Amelia

Email: arobinson2@Dispatch.com

Twitter: @1AmeliaRobinson

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Columbus Dispatch editorial page editor and community engagement editor Amelia Robinson outside the 62 E. Broad St. newsroom on Monday, Nov. 8, 2021.
Columbus Dispatch editorial page editor and community engagement editor Amelia Robinson outside the 62 E. Broad St. newsroom on Monday, Nov. 8, 2021.

This article originally appeared on The Columbus Dispatch: As future of abortions rights hang in balance, it's Election Day