The future is cyborg

Would you get bionic implants to improve your eyesight?

A chip to turbo-charge your brain or guard against cancer?

UPSOT ELON MUSK: “In a lot of ways it's kind of like a Fitbit in your skull, with tiny wires."

Well, according to a survey commissioned by cybersecurity firm Kaspersky, nearly two thirds of people in leading Western European countries would consider human augmentation.

The fusing of artificial intelligence into the human body to make it better, stronger or healthier.

Marco Preuss is Kaspersky European director of global research and analysis.

“Wouldn't it be interesting if you could, for example, see in the dark? How much of being human will there be in the future and how much of technology human hybrids will there be in the future?”

Companies like Elon Musk’s Neuralink, which has already tested on pigs, aim to implant chips into human brains to help cure neurological conditions like Alzheimer's, dementia, and spinal cord injuries.

"We hope to have this in a human patient before the end of next year. So this is not far."

But the Kaspersky survey shows that openness to human augmentation depended on location.

People in Britain, France, and Switzerland were less receptive.

On the other hand those in Portugal and Spain were much more.

"I was positively surprised. I didn't expect it that positive, to be honest, but I think it shows that there is really huge interest and potential in this technology.

Preuss says human augmentation is one of the most significant technology trends today.

“The range of technologies people are researching is huge. Basically, every single aspect of human body is being explored. Implanted filtering system for air where you could go without a gas mask or whatever into dangerous areas. To have a complete artificial stomach, remotely controlled and so on and so on.”

The survey also showed the majority of people felt that only the rich would be able to get access to human augmentation technology.

And there were concerns around the risks.

"There is, of course, this fear about malfunctioning. There is this fear about criminals and hackers gaining access to your body. This is probably more a question about to have more regulation, more standards. And I think these ethical, moral questions are really a huge thing here and can become a game changer in terms of how it would drive the society in all of these countries."

Video Transcript

- Would you get bionic implants to improve your eyesight? A chip to turbocharge your brain, or guard against cancer.

- In a lot of ways, it's kind of like a Fitbit in your skull with tiny wires.

- Well according to a survey commissioned by cybersecurity firm Kaspersky, nearly 2/3 of people in leading Western European countries would consider human augmentation, the fusing of artificial intelligence into the human body to make it better, stronger, or healthier. Marco Preuss is Kaspersky European director of Global Research and Analysis.

MARCO PREUSS: But wouldn't it be interesting if you could, for example, see in the dark? How much of being human will there be in future, and how much of technology-human hybrids will there be in future?

- Here we go, great.

- Companies like Elon Musk's Neuralink, which has already tested on pigs, aimed to implant chips into human brains to help cure neurological conditions like Alzheimer's, dementia, and spinal cord injuries.

ELON MUSK: We hope to have this in a human patient before the end of next year. So this is not far.

- Thought, the Kaspersky survey, shows that openness to human augmentation depended on location. People in Britain, France, and Switzerland were less receptive. On the other hand, those in Portugal and Spain were much more.

MARCO PREUSS: I was positively surprised. I didn't expect it that positive to be honest, but I think it shows that there is really a huge interest and potential in this technology.

- Preuss says human augmentation is one of the most significant technology trends today.

MARCO PREUSS: The range of technologies people are researching is huge. Basically every single aspect of the human body is being explored. Implanted filtering system for air where you could go without a gas mask or whatever into dangerous areas, to have a complete artificial stomach, remotely controlled, and so on and so on.

- The survey also showed the majority of people felt that only the rich would be able to get access to human augmentation technology, and there were concerns around the risks.

MARCO PREUSS: There is of course this fear about malfunctioning. There is this fear about criminals and hackers gaining access to your body. This is probably more a question about to have more regulation more standards. And I think these ethical, moral questions are a really huge thing here, and can become a game changer in terms of how it would drive the society and all of these countries.