How Game of Thrones Made Monsters of Us All

Carlos Roa

Carlos Roa

Game of Thrones,

In its final episodes, Game of Thrones achieves something truly worthy of note: it forces its audience to reckon with the reality that we all too easily indulge in the worst aspects of human nature.

How Game of Thrones Made Monsters of Us All

Game of Thrones, the exceedingly popular TV series, has finally come to an end. This in and of itself is a remarkable achievement: the book series which the show is based upon was supposed to be “unfilmable.” Instead, the “unfilmable” show became one of the most successful cultural phenomena of the modern age—a veritable monoculture that captivated millions of viewers around the world with its tales of courtly intrigue, its gritty and realistic depiction of medieval warfare, and its message that the moral arc of the universe bends towards karmic justice.

That last bit deserves further reflection. George R.R. Martin’s (GRRM) A Song of Ice and Fire book series, upon which Game of Thrones is based upon, is essentially about man’s unending capacity for both good and evil. In a revealing 2012 interview with Canada’s CBC, GRRM discussed how he was a conscientious objector to the Vietnam War and how his beliefs about war and violence influence his books. In his words: “If you’re going to write about war and violence, show the cost. Show how ugly it is. Show both sides of it.”

Game of Thrones FansCheck Out Our New Mini-Section with article after article of GOT content that connects with the national security and foreign policy challenges of today. 

“No One”

Read full article